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Weapon physicist declassifies rescued nuclear test films

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory nuclear weapons testing film

The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second. But in the decades since, around 10,000 of these films sat idle, scattered across the country in high-security vaults. Not only were they gathering dust, the film material itself was slowly decomposing, bringing the data they contained to the brink of being lost forever.

For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films. The goals are to preserve the films’ content before it’s lost forever and to provide better data to the post-testing-era scientists who use computer code to help certify that the aging U.S. nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective.

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If you’re wondering how this film helps maintain the United States’ nuclear deterrent, here’s a video from from 2014 showing how LLNL does just that.

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About Duncan Idaho

Duncan is a science and technology reporter for CDN and serves as the lead geek correspondent. Follow him if you like rockets, mobile tech, video games or ... just about anything nerdy.
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