Tag Archives: survey

Public Approval of Hunting Highest Since 1995

Public approval of hunting chartNEWTOWN, Conn. — The National Shooting Sports Foundation reports that a new survey shows 79 percent of the American public approve of hunting. This marks the highest level of support for hunting since 1995, according to data compiled by Responsive Management, an independent research firm.

The nationwide scientific survey showed the public’s approval of hunting rose five points in the past year, up from 74 percent in 2011. The survey, conducted in February 2013 using random digit dialing and supplemental cellular telephone sampling, was the fifth in a series of similar surveys by Responsive Management to track trends in public approval of hunting since 1995.

Support for hunting has remained generally consistent during this time–73 percent in 1995; 75 percent in 2003; 78 percent in 2006; 74 percent in 2011; and a peak of 79 percent in 2013.

Mark Damian Duda, executive director of Responsive Management, is still looking at survey results to better understand why approval has increased. Said Duda, “Approval of hunting among Americans is fairly stable and bounces between 73 and 79 percent. The reasons for this increase are still unclear, but it is probably related to the increase in hunting and shooting participation.

Added Duda, “Since 2006, hunting participation has increased by 9 percent while shooting participation has increased 18 percent since 2009. Other studies we have conducted on public opinion on hunting show that the strongest correlation for approval of hunting is knowing a hunter–over and above demographic variables or anything else. With the increased number of hunters in the field and sport shooters at the range, it is possible that this is being reflected in this uptick in support for hunting.”

One thousand Americans 18 years old and older were surveyed to achieve a sampling error of plus or minus 3.00 percentage points. More than half (52%) of those surveyed strongly approved of hunting. At the other end of the spectrum, 12 percent of Americans disapprove of hunting. Another 8 percent neither approve nor disapprove (total does not equal 100% due to rounding).

RepubliKKKans Fail to Defeat Obama

The Associated Press image of white America.

Tuesday I spent almost an hour waiting in line with a bunch of racists. Previously I would have described the experience as I waiting in line to vote, but thanks to the Associated Press, I now know different.

A recent AP poll on racial attitudes proves conclusively that should Obama lose the election, journalists will blame his defeat on white Republican racists.

According AP, “Racial attitudes have not improved in the four years since the United States elected its first black president, as a slight majority of Americans now express prejudice toward blacks whether they recognize those feelings or not.” (emphasis added). How’s that for white America being bad to the bone?

The survey also confirms the vast majority of mainstream journalists still suffer from chronic liberal guilt, a pre–existing malady Obamacare will actively promote.

The Thought Police at AP explained, “The Associated Press polls were designed to dig into one of the most sensitive subjects in American Politics: racial attitudes and their effect on how people will vote in an election in which the nation’s first black president could be re–elected.

Overall the survey found that by virtue of racial prejudice, [Obama could lose] an estimated net loss of 2 percentage points due to anti–black attitudes…”

The Obama defeat story practically writes itself, particularly when Monday’s Rasmussen Reports tracking poll has the race at 49 Romney and 48 Obama.

The AP survey was not conducted over the phone. Instead the respondents were invited to complete the questionnaire on a computer because: “Studies have shown people are more willing to reveal potentially unpopular attitudes on a computer than in questioning by a live interviewer.” They certainly watch a lot more porn and use bad language online, so why not express unpopular attitudes, too.

But since AP researchers know white supremacists are devious and will try to mislead earnest scientists by doing something like electing a black president; they also tested “implicit” racism by means of an “affect misattribution” test. They claim this is accurate because social scientists say so.

What they don’t tell you is the research sample is often composed of a handful of university graduate students that need the credit for participating or simply need the money. The test is taken in an artificial environment where the subjects know they are being tested (see Heisenberg Effect for details). Then ‘mirabile dictu’ the test confirms what the “scientists” already knew.

The “affect misattribution” test —America Found Guilty — involves flashing photos of people of different races (ugly, fierce, plain, beautiful, the number of variables beggars description) for a nanosecond or two. Followed by a neutral image — in this case a Chinese character — and asking whether the logo for egg foo young is a pleasant or unpleasant symbol.

In an earlier time this technique was called “subliminal advertising” and it was found unpersuasive when used to try to convince movie goers to buy more Coke; but AP is convinced this technique will root out those who still think Rodney King should have gotten his behind kicked.

As David Moore points out, when you apply the same AP “methodology” to black subjects, you find 43 percent of the blacks express “anti–black sentiments.” While 30 percent of the whites express “anti–white” sentiments (no word on whether this group was composed of journalists or Democrats).

Maybe it’s just me, but I would question the accuracy of a survey that purports to reveal hidden white Republican racism, when it also “reveals” 43 percent of the black sample doesn’t like blacks either. Unless they are self–hating black Republicans.

Even if you ignore the voodoo part of the test the normal questions only confirm AP’s stereotype of white Republican racists.

To goad survey takers into being explicitly racist, the questioners ask if they agree, “Other minorities overcame prejudice and worked their way up. Blacks should do the same without special favors,” “it’s really a matter of some people just not trying hard enough; if blacks would only try harder…” and “blacks who receive money from welfare could get along without it if they tried” to name but a few.

By my count the only one they left out was “Jackie Robinson was a credit to his race.”

As for the special condemnation of Republicans, you simply have to take AP’s word for it, since readers are denied access to the crosstabs.

But as I write this at 12:47 AM, the mainstream media won’t have to blame racists for defeating Obama, because he was re–elected. Instead results of this poll will simply be saved for some time in the future when reporters need to explain Republican motivation for opposing that nice President Obama, assuming it ever happens.

Businesses: Government a Barrier, Not a Help, to Economic Growth

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) today announced the results of a nationwide survey of small businesses and manufacturers. The results cast a harsh light on the state of the U.S. economy six weeks before Election Day.

The poll, conducted by Public Opinion Strategies (POS), surveyed 800 small business owners, manufacturers and decision-makers at small and medium-sized companies, with a majority (55 percent) saying the national economy is in a worse position compared to three years ago. Among the chief factors survey respondents cited were federal regulations, taxes, government spending and the cost of health insurance and energy.

Key survey findings include the following:

  • 67 percent say there is too much uncertainty in the market today to expand, grow or hire new workers.
  • 69 percent of small business owners and manufacturers say President Obama’s Executive Branch and regulatory policies have hurt American small businesses and manufacturers.
  • 55 percent say they would not start a business today given what they know now and in the current environment.
  • 54 percent say other countries like China and India are more supportive of their small businesses and manufacturers than the United States.

“Manufacturers have told policymakers in Washington time and again that uncertainty and a negative business environment is turning the American Dream into a nightmare,” said NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons. “The findings of this survey show that manufacturers and other small businesses have a starkly negative outlook for their future—with good reason. There is far too much uncertainty, too many burdensome regulations and too few policymakers willing to put aside their egos and fulfill their responsibilities to the American people. To fix this problem, we need immediate action on pro-growth tax and regulatory policies that put manufacturers in the United States in a position to compete and succeed in an ever-more competitive global economy.”

NFIB President and CEO Dan Danner said, “The small businesses who are the engine of our economy are clamoring for their elected representatives to stand up and lead so they can focus on the business of getting America back on its feet. Yet, instead of smoothing the way, our government continues to erect more barriers to growth through burdensome regulations that increase costs for small businesses and all Americans. It’s time Washington started listening to America’s job creators and offered real solutions to help us back to prosperity.”

Bill McInturff of POS said, “The data in this survey offer a striking picture of how American businesses view the current state of the U.S. economy. It’s clear that small business owners and manufacturers are becoming increasingly more frustrated by the federal government’s inability to solve America’s economic problems. Manufacturers place most of the blame squarely on policies coming out of Washington.”

Survey: Democrats and Republicans Disagree About Government Intervention on Food Policy

CHICAGO, May 17, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — When it comes to food policy issues, there are clear party lines between Democrats and Republicans.  FoodMinds’ third “Food Temperance in America” survey found that 75 percent of Democrats think more time should be spent on food policy topics within presidential debates and in overall discussions about government policies, while only 39 percent of Republicans think so.

“While there is some common ground between Republicans and Democrats on the importance of ensuring food safety and stabilizing food prices, they notably disagree on the importance of critical food policy issues such as hunger, nutrition education, and the production and quality of foods served in schools,” said Susan Pitman, MA, RD, FoodMinds partner. “It’s clear political ideology determines the way Americans think about government intervention when it comes to food-related policies.”

The “Food Temperance in America” survey tracks opinions on food policy topics among registered voters and Opinion Leader Shoppers, a group of politically aware and socially active consumers. The results are being presented at the Consumer Federation of America’s Food Policy Conference today by Ms. Pitman during the “Election 2012 – Voter Attitudes on Food and Nutrition Issues” panel.

U.S. Consumers Expect to Spend Same or Less in 2011 Holiday Shopping Season Due to Economy

AUSTIN, Texas, Oct. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — A telephone survey conducted among 1,000 U.S. adults by Ipsos Public Affairs commissioned by Offers.com found that, given the state of the economy, 87 percent of respondents are planning to spend the same or less during the upcoming holiday season than they did in 2010.  The survey also found that almost half of consumers have been looking for deals throughout the year when shopping for those on their holiday gift list, while just 18 percent are planning to wait to shop on Black Friday or Cyber Monday. Only 48 percent plan to look for online coupons or coupon codes to stretch their holiday spending dollars before making a purchase.

Other highlights from the survey asked specifically about holiday shopping plans include:

  • 52 percent of respondents spend more than an hour researching the best price for each holiday purchase, while 7 percent of consumers report to spend more than 6 hours researching each purchase they make for the holidays.
  • 27 percent have been keeping their eye on online specials and daily deals, and 50 percent turn to newspaper or magazine coupons for savings.
  • 69 percent of holiday shoppers would prefer to shop in a retail store rather than online if the merchandise and deals were the same, while 47 percent said they would shop online if the deals were better than in stores.

“With a majority of U.S. consumers being not likely to look for online coupons or coupon codes when they shop this holiday season, millions of consumers may let savings pass them by,” said Steve Schaffer, CEO of Offers.com.  “Online shopping can provide much better value, selection, and convenience than shopping at retail, and online coupons offer extra discounts that can’t be found elsewhere. The team at Offers.com makes it easy to save money and time while shopping at any time of the year, because we manually screen thousands of the best available offers and deals on a daily basis to ensure that they work.”

Offers.com provides consumers with easy-to-find online coupons, coupon codes, offers, and deals from thousands of online stores, and the Offers.com Holiday Savings Center provides consumers with unique and helpful content such as checklists, shopping tips, and survival guides.  Offers.com also organizes deals and provides guidance around specific holidays and trends such as Halloween, Black Friday 2011 Deals, and Cyber Monday 2011 Deals.

Additional demographic findings of the holiday spending poll include:

  • While just 16 percent of adults with a household income of $75,000 or more indicated that they were not at all likely to seek out online coupons or coupon codes, almost three times as many (44 percent) of those with a household income of $25,000 gave the same answer.
  • 73 percent of respondents aged 18-34 would prefer to shop in retail stores if the merchandise and deals were the same, but if the deals were better online, 50 percent would shop online instead.
  • Similar to other age groups, 51 percent of respondents aged 18-34 have used newspaper or magazine coupons in the last 30 days.

The survey was conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs in September 2011.  For the survey, a nationally representative sample of 1,001 randomly-selected adults aged 18 and over residing in the U.S. was interviewed by telephone via Ipsos’ U.S. Telephone Express omnibus.  With a sample of this size, the results are considered accurate within +/-3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire population of adults in the U.S. been polled.