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Author Archives: Katherine Revello

A recent graduate of the University of Maine, where she majored in journalism and political science, Katherine Revello is an aspiring political commentator. Her focuses include theory, the philosophy of money and populism. Currently, she is a graduate student at Villanova University. She is the founder of The Politics of Discretion, a blog dedicated to advancing her philosophy of discretionism. Follow her on Twitter: @MrsWynandPapers

Climate Chaos Arrives As Global Leaders Meet at UN to Discuss Environment

United Nations

Climate chaos begins today. Exactly 500 days ago, John Kerry and French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius held a joint press conference at the State Department and prophesied the world had that amount of time to forestall global environmental catastrophe. Yet, the sun is shining and it’s a balmy 66 degrees Fahrenheit by the Weather Underground in New York City today ...

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The Morality of Statism and Modern Liberal Leaders

There is much discussion of societal evil by contemporary world leaders especially as Pope Francis embarks on a tour of unity and advocacy, seeking solidarity with global leaders. Those who control powerful institutions sit back and lecture others about the evils of hegemony seem to be blind to the irony of their criticism. Their critique of the excesses of individuals ...

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From the 1980s to Today: The Perversion of Moral Authority in the Free World

In the 1980s, the world had the leadership of a triumvirate- Pope John Paul II, Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher. Their message was simple and straightforward: dignity of the self through adherence to principles through work ethic and larger social interaction. It was a positive ideology that promulgated cohesion and understanding. But it did not shy away from division. Those ...

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Takeaway from the Second Debates: GOP is Personality, Not Ideology Centered

Within the first moments of Tuesday night’s prime time debate, Donald Trump had established his superiority. Not as a candidate whose viewpoint had validity because polling- a very constrained measure at best- suggest his message resonates with voters, but as a Stalin-esque dictator whose premier standing in the race made him final arbiter of all related matters. As he belittled ...

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Redefining the Social Contract

The social contract is implicit in every campaign. In discussing the merits of various social programs and economic plans, candidates tout the benefits citizenship and specific party membership can bring, the obvious goal being to sway a plurality of the polity into voting for their vision of government. By extension, a positive vote for one plan is a negative vote ...

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The Evils of Political Tolerance Towards Rogue Regimes

The tolerance of an authoritative hand begets chaos, chaos in which dishonesty and maliciousness reign. Yet, it is precisely this hand of appeasement America has extended to the regimes whose antics resemble those of the lashing out of a petulant child. Dissidents in Syria, Ukraine and Cuba have called out to the United States for help. But the Obama administration ...

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The Coming Social Security War

When one faction of politicians makes a principled stance and threatens to shut down the government, the opposing faction likes to conjure up images of an apocalyptic world where the sick and the elderly are left to starve because they cannot get their federal benefits. As it turns out, the real threat to entitlements is a fully functioning government doing ...

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The Myth of Expansive Workers’ Rights

For many, Labor Day is a chance to seize the remaining vestiges of summer- the final trip to the beach, the last picnic before the weather turns too crisp. But for many politicians and labor activists, it’s a chance to harp on the supposed horrors of American capitalism. Because apparently any wage below $15 an hour is exploitation. As are ...

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Rampant Hatch Act Violations Revealed in Clinton Emails

The Hatch Act was first passed in 1939 to protect against the development of an oligarchy where high level political appointees use their official titles and powers to sway elections. Most federal employees who work for the executive branch are prohibited to some degree from participating in political activity. Members of the executive departments are held to less stringent standards, ...

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The Other Side of the Clinton Email Scandal

Yesterday the State Department released another 7,000 pages of email correspondence sent and received by Hillary Clinton during her tenure as Secretary of State. Despite the announcement that Clinton viewed even more classified material through her private address, the sympathetic media is, predictably, making little of it. Clinton’s puerile blame-shifting and finger-pointing defense continues. And it is likely to do ...

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The Deeper Problem With Hillary Clinton Likening Republicans to Terrorists

Yesterday, Hillary Clinton launched another attack in the long-running Democrat guerrilla warfare campaign against the “war on women.” In an incredibly bold and impassioned display of rhetoric, which in no way made the same sort of ad hoc judgments her ilk claim to so despise, the Democrat frontrunner likened pro-life Republican presidential candidates to terrorists. As a registered Republican and ...

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Has the Right Abandoned Free Market Economics?

From the earliest days of the republic, a faction of people have recognized the inextricable tie between economic and civil liberty. During the days of the Constitutional Convention, minus the protections afforded by the Bill of Rights, much dissent focused on the affect unchecked taxing power could have in allowing despotism to flourish: “By virtue of their power of taxation, ...

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Is Modern Politics Just a Semantics Game?

Donald Trump

Donald Trump may have brought the immigration issue to the forefront of the primary, but the nuances have effectively become a cudgel with which the media can beat him and his running mates. And yet none of the questions asked in sanctimonious tones by anchors who confuse intensity and anger with serious skepticism seem concerned with the actual merit of ...

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Is Rule of Law Dead in America?

When the president rules by fiat, touting the dual powers of his pen and his phone, and the Supreme Court commandeers legislative power, political rule of law is obviously just a token on which feckless politicians run, paying lip service because it buoys political efficacy and turns out the vote. But lost in the lamentations of the tarnishing of the ...

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