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Canadian Men Suffering More on Mental Health

Recent research from the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry found that Canadian men are disproportionately suffering from mental health problems compared to their female counterparts.

Approximately 50 Canadian men die by suicide every week, and 75% of the total suicide rate is men. Also, 80% of opioid overdose deaths are from men.

As a result, the Canadian Mental Health Association said there is a men’s mental health crisis in the country that is going undiagnosed.

In an editorial in the journal, Dr. Rob Whitley argues that psychiatry has focused heavily on women’s mental health issues, but men’s issues are often overlooked. He wrote, “a definable field of men’s mental health has only emerged in the last decade, and even then, this has been a quiet emergence.”

He also says that the public often ‘victim-blames’ men when it comes to their mental health problems. Many health services stigmatize mental health issues that men face and trivialize the impact it has on their lives.

Young boys also suffer from an abnormally high level of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, an issue that holds back many young men in education.

Increasingly, young men are seeking out self-help books and routines that can better their lives. In an increasingly online world, many men are emphasizing the need for self-care and self-improvement.

Unfortunately, men are less likely to seek help if they suffer from mental health problems, and only 30% of Canadians who use mental health services are male. The lack of men accessing these services is perhaps one reason why Canadian men suffer from higher rates of mental health issues.

One way that men are seeking to become more social and interact with their surroundings more is through working out and going to the gym. Many psychiatrists advocate exercise as a way to improve mental health for those who do not suffer from severe mental health problems.

Jannik Lindner of SUPPLEMENTNATION said, “we are seeing an increase in men seeking out workout supplements that help them with their health. More men are looking for information about creatine which helps improve muscle mass, and perform better in athletic situations.”

Many men prefer taking action to rectify their situation as opposed to taking medication or attending therapy sessions. If Canada and other countries want to work on their men’s mental health crisis it would be wise to take a multifaceted approach.

More men should be made to feel comfortable in using traditional mental health services, but there also need to be more options on the table for men seeking alternative treatment methods that fit their situation.

Working out may work for some, but others will need to connect more with their community and hear other men talk about their problems.

Innovative solutions and more emphasis on men’s mental health is needed in Canada and many other countries suffering from high rates of addiction and other mental health crises. The opioid crisis is hitting many communities across North America, and more comprehensive measures and thoughtful political discourse can’t come soon enough.

Recent research from the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry found that Canadian men are disproportionately suffering from mental health problems compared to their female counterparts.

Approximately 50 Canadian men die by suicide every week, and 75% of the total suicide rate is men. Also, 80% of opioid overdose deaths are from men.

As a result, the Canadian Mental Health Association said there is a men’s mental health crisis in the country that is going undiagnosed.

In an editorial in the journal, Dr. Rob Whitley argues that psychiatry has focused heavily on women’s mental health issues, but men’s issues are often overlooked. He wrote, “a definable field of men’s mental health has only emerged in the last decade, and even then, this has been a quiet emergence.”

He also says that the public often ‘victim-blames’ men when it comes to their mental health problems. Many health services stigmatize mental health issues that men face and trivialize the impact it has on their lives.

Young boys also suffer from an abnormally high level of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, an issue that holds back many young men in education.

Increasingly, young men are seeking out self-help books and routines that can better their lives. In an increasingly online world, many men are emphasizing the need for self-care and self-improvement.

Unfortunately, men are less likely to seek help if they suffer from mental health problems, and only 30% of Canadians who use mental health services are male. The lack of men accessing these services is perhaps one reason why Canadian men suffer from higher rates of mental health issues.

One way that men are seeking to become more social and interact with their surroundings more is through working out and going to the gym. Many psychiatrists advocate exercise as a way to improve mental health for those who do not suffer from severe mental health problems.

Jannik Lindner of SUPPLEMENTNATION said, “we are seeing an increase in men seeking out workout supplements that help them with their health. More men are looking for information about creatine which helps improve muscle mass, and perform better in athletic situations.”

Many men prefer taking action to rectify their situation as opposed to taking medication or attending therapy sessions. If Canada and other countries want to work on their men’s mental health crisis it would be wise to take a multifaceted approach.

More men should be made to feel comfortable in using traditional mental health services, but there also need to be more options on the table for men seeking alternative treatment methods that fit their situation.

Working out may work for some, but others will need to connect more with their community and hear other men talk about their problems.

Innovative solutions and more emphasis on men’s mental health is needed in Canada and many other countries suffering from high rates of addiction and other mental health crises. The opioid crisis is hitting many communities across North America, and more comprehensive measures and thoughtful political discourse can’t come soon enough.

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