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Wolf Reintroduction: The Big Lie that is Crushing the Western Way of Life

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  1. Snake says:

    One thing that has to be understood is that ecosystems can be viewed in many ways. They can be a place you go to, classified through aesthetics (either pleasing or bad to look at), economically (you can build on them, exploit resources, open a park), and so forth.

    In the mid to late 1800′s and into the 1900′s it was decided that more Elk to hunt in the midwest would better benefit humans. To make this happen a government effort was started to exterminate the Wolf from its original, natural home. The last of the wolves were killed in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho during this project. At the time it was the policy of the federal government to exterminate wolves everywhere, even in national parks. The last wolves in Yellowstone were killed in 1924 when rangers killed two wolf pups at Soda Butte Creek in the northeast corner of the park. In the 60′s and 70′s public opinion changed and wolves were added to the endangered species list. Slowly wolves began to trickle back down from Canada into Montana in the 1980′s.

    The absence of the Wolf in Yellowstone caused a domino effect all the way down the food chain. The Elk population grew unchecked resulting in an enormous amount of Elk to hunt. These Elk devoured the majority of the vegetation across the park. This led to populations of smaller animals mice, squirrels, etc. Not having good habitats and food sources. Another species majorly affected were beavers. All of these animals and many types of plants became scarce.

    After many failed attempts at trapping and culling the giant herd of Elk a very controversial move was made to reinstate the Wolf population back into their natural home. Not only in Yellowstone, but in Wyoming and central Idaho as well. 66 wolves were captured near Alberta Canada and released. As the Elk population declined the vegetation began to sprout back up and as it did many animals began moving back in to their natural habitats.

    So it really depends on your own opinion.

    Is sacrificing an entire ecosystem to make a quick buck worth it? Or should you try and find a job that doesn’t depend on over grown men-children playing army against a herd unarmed, unintelligent, cows with antlers?

    Honestly I feel that we should almost be expected to fix a fixable problem we caused before it is too late. We went in and eliminated a top predator of an ecosystem. Normally there is only one top predator, otherwise it wouldn’t be on top. This has devastating effects on the entire community of animals who, after all, were here first.

    • Snake Killer says:

      So what if wolves or other animals were here first. What ever happened to survival of the fittest?

      • Anonymous says:

        The problem with that line of thought is, in nature, survival of the fitness only affects species in competition. Usually these species are the same until the competition pushes them into different ecological niches resulting in speciation.

        Also, shooting animals or eliminating them through other methods is not “survival of the fittest” it’s artificial selection of one species over another. In other words, unnatural.

        By removing wolves you make elk more biologically fit and then they cause a dominoes effect all the way down the food web.

        • Snake Killer says:

          By what standard are humans any less ‘natural’ than anything else if we all ‘evolved’ from the same puddle of soup? Chain reactions are all over nature, so what’s the difference between a domino-effect caused by man and one caused by anything else?

      • Snake says:

        The problem with that line of thought is, in nature, survival of the fitness only affects species in competition. Usually these species are the same until the competition pushes them into different ecological niches resulting in speciation.

        Also, shooting animals or eliminating them through other methods is not “survival of the fittest” it’s artificial selection of one species over another. In other words, unnatural.

        By removing wolves you make elk more biologically fit and then they cause a dominoes effect all the way down the food web.

  2. Max says:

    Interesting article. As a pro-wolf man, I agree that outsiders should have no say in this issue. The ranchers, hunters, and local economies have been dealt a huge blow.

    I think we should re-introduce pit vipers into Congress, and into the meetings held by environmental groups. I’m quite sure snakes were killed to erect their places of gathering.

  3. Idaho gal says:

    #1 The wolves are HUGE. Much larger than the native wolves that were here. They have been recorded to weigh up to 175 pounds. Contrast that with the average German Shepherd which weighs about 75 pounds.

    #2 I have yet to meet ANYONE who lives here, who wants them around.

    #3 They are killing things that we want to be alive. You shouldn’t have to sit out with the cows 24/7 just so you can shoot at wolves. It makes as much sense as letting a serial killer out of prison, telling him to stay within a certain area, and then letting the public know what he looks like and that they have permission to shoot him if he comes on your property and starts attacking you.

    All of these arguments about reintroduction are largely irrelevant. The native wolves are gone, and there is no way to bring them back. The black rhino just went extinct in the wild, bringing in other species of rhino will still not replace the type that is missing. Hey. Dinosaurs used to roam free too. If Jurassic Park were a reality, how many of these same people would be pushing for a reintroduction of those critters?

    • DJ Redman says:

      Very valid point Idaho Gal,

      In order to pull this scam off, the Feds had to designate wolves as an “endangered species” and, as the gentleman proves in the movie, the wolves are not a biologically endangered species, and never were , not even close. Thus the feds did this based on a lie to the people and a blatant abuse of the very endangered species act that they used to do this irresponsible action. Of course the federal bullies will threaten to cancel the lease-contract for any grazing land they may have if the ranchers take action themselves to protect their livelihood.

  4. michaelp says:

    I wonder……………what was the animal population was like 200 years ago? It seems to me that if man would just butt out and let nature take its course………..things might work out. Remember………….the animals were here first!

    • bonnieg says:

      A friend just sent this article to me. I live in northern Idaho. Twenty years ago a woman I knew who had grown up in the Clearwater River drainage said they’d seen wolf sign many times over the years before any Canadian gray wolves were forcibly introduced into the area. She’s not the only person I’ve heard say this. Canadian gray wolves are 3 feet high at the shoulder, something like five feet long to their haunches. They are genetically distinct from the native wolves they are supposedly “replacing”.

      Friends whose families have lived and hunted in the Idaho panhandle for over 70 years and got their deer and elk tags filled every year have experienced a significant decline in sightings of both, especially elk over the past 12-15 years. Their family sets up camp all of hunting season with at least two people out there 24/7 the whole season. In the past ten years they’ve gone at least three without filling everyone’s deer tag and without even seeing an elk, let alone shooting one.

      Two years ago a coworker’s husband and his friends were sitting around their campfire after dark at the end of a day of hunting. It was dark but they could see five or six pairs of eyes shining between the trees and brush two or three yards off from them. They knew it was wolves but they didn’t expect them to come any closer because of the fire and because they were all talking and laughing. Wolves are timid, right? Apparently not because all of a sudden two of them ran right through their camp, past the fire, and the others ran past them outside their group but a couple were close enough to have touched if they’d wanted to. Her husband said they were huge. It scared all of the hunters because it went against everything we’ve all been told about wolf behavior.

      The argument that people should just get out of the way and let the animals “that were here first” and nature just work things out is naive at best. I’m not sure where michaelp lives but I guarantee that if his recommendation were followed he’d be 1-hungry; 2-cold; 3-endangered, and not by another human being.

  5. Hank says:

    And as to Shayla’s facebook comment, the answer is ‘probably yes in some cases’. But we need to remember that the Fed’s don’t own these lands, the States do. The Constitution gives the Federal Government 10 square miles to administrate, and as per the tenth Amendment, because administration of territory within a state is not prohibited to the States, it is reserved to them. If the states choose to allow the Fed’s to administer certain portions of the land, that seems alright, as long as it does not affect other States, but its Constitutionality is dubious. Therefore, if the States own the land, then citizens of those states have as much right to them as they do to any other portion owned by the state. These subsidies should be refused by ranchers on philosophical and practical grounds (just as they should refuse to accept pay from the government for livestock killed by wolves), but we also need to realize that the Federal Government has no rights to the land, and should be paying ‘rent’ to somebody for the ability to administrate it, which is nothing more than an exercise of unnecessary power. The states won’t charge ‘rent’, so why not the ranchers in the form of subsidization? Don’t get me wrong. I hate subsidies in any form, but it is not the root issue here. The Federal Government abusing its authority is. But two wrongs (abuse of power and acceptance of subsidies) don’t make a right.

  6. Hank says:

    Hey DJ. Great article! This story is a relatively local one, but there are lessons to be learned by others. The Federal Government is the same corrupt and pushy gang of moochers no matter where you live and the special interests (including the enviro-conglomerate lobby) know it better than anyone else and won’t miss any opportunity to take advantage of the crisis that is the state of this country.

    • DJ Redman says:

      Thank you Hank and Thank all of you whom have taken the time to share your thoughts here at CDN.

      One aspect of this tragedy is the fact that while the feds are encroaching on the State’s land is a given, I can see how the feds will use this as a further land grab by… naming any state the wolves travel through or live in, as federally protected land, thereby taking total control over all the affected State’s land in huge chunks. This speaks of the importance of electing STRONG Governors who will stand up to the feds and stop this madness.

      Footnote: From years of hunting experience, I can tell you that the Wolves are “hamstringing” many cattle/sheep/Moose/Deer/Elk as a way to let them die at a later date to ensure an easier meal later on. The tree-hugging animal rights nut-jobs are nowhere to be seen here as animals die a gruesome, slow death from being hamstrung by wolves. That is because they are all in bed together, period. You don’t thing the “supposed animal rights groups” will protest the government wolves ravaging other animals, while at the same time begging for more taxpayer dollars do you?

      • Hank says:

        Thanks again, DJ.

        If I may pontificate yet again…

        You are absolutely right. Wolves are very cruel creatures. Often they will destroy a whole herd but eat one or two of their kills. There was one instance in Dillon, MT (around where I was born and spent the first few years of my life, and also where the documentarian spent a good portion of his childhood) where a single pack wiped out 120 sheep and only nibbled on a few of them. It is their chase instincts that kick in, not their survival instincts. I am all for a hungry animal predating on wildlife. That’s nature. But as soon as there are sport killings or predation on livestock, something more has to be done in the area of managing predators. The assertion that wolves and predators in general tend to go after the weak and sickly of the herd, thus making survival easier for the strong and healthy in the process of natural selection is a complete myth. Predators, via their chase instincts, enjoy a challenge (running down stronger and numerous embers of the herd, whether they eat them or not) as much as they enjoy a meal. Ever seen a cat play with a mouse?

        In addition to hamstringing, wolves are known to eat horses, moose (one issue of National Geographic took photographs of a particularly disturbing incident), elk, and deer while they are still breathing, usually from the gut or back end. When wolves make a meal of other predators, including cat-hunting hounds, they will start with the brain. They will rip the fetuses from pregnant deer, horses, and cattle, sometimes eating them, sometimes not. In addition to all this, the stress put on cattle and sheep decreases yields in terms of lost weight and stress-induced abortions. In areas with a notable wolf population but , some ranches take as big (or bigger) hit in profits from lost weight and aborted births as they do from kills.

        The Feds and private organizations will sometimes offer to pay ‘damages’, but these are only for ‘confirmed’ wolf predations. A confirmed wolf predation is anything a bought-off biologist says it is. The money paid is often less than what the stock was worth and comes from either the tax payer (theft) or a private organization (bribery). There is no payment for lost weight or stress-induced abortions. Many ranchers refuse to accept any payment, not wanting to abet the subsidization of wolf destructiveness.

        There was one specific case, involving a bear, not a wolf, where the bear directly killed one sheep, but chased the rest off of a bluff (killing them). The owners were paid for just the one sheep, because it was alleged that the other sheep ‘voluntarily’ ran over the edge.

        And yet this is just ONE small, regional, facet of what is being done to this country by bureaucratic tyranny, special interests, and covert radicals.

      • Scott says:

        Native Americans lived and hunted along side wolf packs with bows and arrows. They did fine until your ancestors nearly eradicated all the bison, bear, wolf and elk.

        Now, with your rifles, scopes and traps you ignorant people complain your unable to compete with the Gray wolf, which interestingly never seemed to cross the US border until the feds reintroduced them back into Yellow Stone.

        The Gray wolf isn’t going run you all off your ranches, but your ignorance and hydraulic fracturing just may very well force a harsh change to your way of life.

        Best of luck.