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Survey: Americans Believe Tech Makes Their Lives Better But Society Worse

The vast majority of Americans believe that smartphones and internet technology have improved their lives, yet consumers are extremely concerned about tech’s impact on society as a whole – especially in relation to data security, the growing gap between rich and poor, and job opportunities.

Americans do not believe that policymakers are keeping up with the pace of technological change and, by wide majorities, believe that government should do more to regulate the internet and other advanced technologies.

These findings are part of a new survey of 1,040* American consumers released today by Vrge Strategies.

“Americans have a deeply divided view about technology. We remain in love with the internet, smart phones, and other advanced technologies for our own use, but we’ve got serious concerns about its widescale impact,” said Josh Zecher, partner and co-founder of Vrge Strategies. “This should raise red flags for the technology industry. If companies don’t take steps to rebuild trust with consumers today, regulators will step in tomorrow with solutions that could very well put entire business models at risk.”

The Love
Americans are very positive about the impact modern technology is having on their daily lives.

  • 81 percent of Americans say that the internet, smartphones and other emerging technologies have made their lives better.
  • 42 percent of Americans feel that consumer technologies and social media have made their relationships with family and friends more impactful. Just 29% said it made them less impactful.

The Loathing
Despite the positive views toward the impact of technology in their lives, Americans are increasingly pessimistic about the effect of new technology on society.

  • 46 percent believe that the internet and social media have had a negative impact on society, while only 36 percent had a positive impact.
  • 38 percent believe technology is making the gap between rich and poor wider, while only 22 percent believe technology is bridging the gap.
  • 60 percent believe artificial intelligence developments will reduce job opportunities.
  • Half of all respondents think that the pace of technological change is too fast, while only six percent think it is too slow.

As the technology industry chases new growth by disrupting highly regulated industries, Americans don’t trust tech companies with sensitive information.

  • 67 percent would not give technology companies highly personal information to reduce your daily commute.
  • 65 percent would not share your medical records or other personal health information to technology companies in order to improve your healthcare.
  • 66 percent would not want to live in a smart city.

Yet, the most concerning data point for technology companies is the growing perception among Americans that the industry doesn’t care about these negative consequences of their technologies.

  • 55 percent of Americans believe that technology companies don’t care about how their products impact society.

Americans Believe that Tech Needs to Be Regulated
In the past, Americans largely supported a hands-off policy approach to internet and technology companies that would allow them to innovate, flourish, and grow. Now, in the age where five of the top ten most valuable companies in the world are tech firms, Americans believe that policymakers need to take more actions to protect consumers.

  • 72 percent believe policymakers are not keeping up with the pace of technology.
  • 41 percent believe we don’t have enough regulations on new technologies and only 17 percent think we have too much regulation.

“Americans believe that the pace of technological change is moving too fast and policymakers are moving too slow,” said Josh Zecher, partner and co-founder of Vrge Strategies. “This helps explain the legislative and regulatory headwinds tech is seeing in Washington and state capitols around the nation. It’s clear that tech must do a much better job of educating consumers and policymakers about the benefits of their products and services, and how they help our nation as a whole.”

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About Duncan Idaho

Duncan is a science and technology editor for CDN. Any opinions expressed in his articles are his own and not necessarily shared by CDN, its staff, officers, or their pets.

One comment

  1. Duncan;

    only 5% of those Americans who took the survey actually understand the Bill of RIGHTS!

    only 5.5% actually know what Capitalism is.

    75% don’t know anything more than what “somebody good with words” has told them that they know.

    few, if any, understand the term “Rugged Individualism”.

    few, if any, understand the term “Techno Feudalism”.

    Most think the Federal Government is the answer to all of society’s stumbling and ill’s when (like Anthropological Climate Change) upon occasion it is reflected against the facts (its handling of money, preference to Socialism over a decaying infrastructure, AND the Post Office) it clearly isn’t!

    What ever happened to Lazasse Faire and the simple relationship between the buyer’s good sense and the seller’s bad product? Are we so far gone that we couldn’t wipe our own asses except the government regulate it?!

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