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What’s in the 2018 Omnibus Spending Law? H.R. 1625: The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018

President Donald Trump signed H.R. 1625: “The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018” into law on Friday. The law funds the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2018, but at over 2200 pages, what’s actually in it?

Basically, the Act provides funding for each of the agencies and departments of the federal government. The law also provides guidance for how the money may or may not be used and instructions to agencies on specific programs. Here’s how the government will spend taxpayer money for the remainder of 2018.

This post was originally published on March 25th, updated on March 26th, March 27th and completed on March 28th.

High-visibility items in the 2018 budget bill

A quick look at major government spending for 2018

  • Agriculture
    • $29.9 million allocated for “broadband communication loans.”
    • $24.3 billion for the school lunch program
    • $6.2 billion for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program
    • $74 billion for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) – aka Food Stamps
  • Justice
    • $1.5 billion for the Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System
    • $9 billion for FBI “salaries and expenses”
    • $2.2 billion for DEA “salaries and expenses”
    • $1.3 billion for BATFE “salaries and expenses”
    • $7.1 billion for Federal Prison System “salaries and expenses”
    • $75 million for grants to States to upgrade criminal and mental health records for the National Instant Background Check System (NICS)
    • $75 million for the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative is now directed to fund the “Stop School Violence Act of 2018
    • $330 million for opioid abuse reduction
  • Science
    • $6.2 billion for NASA operations
    • $6.3 billion for the National Science Foundation
  • Defense
    • Military personnel pay, allowances, expenses, retirement
      • $41.6 billion for the Army
      • $28.8 billion for the Navy
      • $13.2 billion for the Marine Corps
      • $28.8 billion for the Air Force
      • $4.7 billion for Army Reserve
      • $2 billion for Navy Reserve
      • $764 million for Marine Corps Reserve
      • $1.8 million for Air Force Reserve
      • $8.2 billion for National Guard, Army
      • $3.4 billion for National Guard, Air Force
    • Operations and Maintenance
      • $34 billion for “defense-wide” use at the discretion of Secretary of Defense
      • $38.8 billion for the Army
      • $45.4 billion for the Navy
      • $6.6 billion for the Marine Corps
      • $39.5 billion for the Air Force
      • $2.9 billion for Army Reserve
      • $1.1 billion for Navy Reserve
      • $285 million for Marine Corps Reserve
      • $3.2 billion for Air Force Reserve
      • $7.3 billion for Army National Guard
      • $6.9 billion for Air National Guard
    • Procurement/Re-fit
      • $5.4 billion “defense-wide” to be used at the discretion of the Secretary of Defense
      • $24 billion for the Army
      • $55.2 billion for Navy
      • $1.9 billion for Marine Corps
      • $46.4 billion for Air Force
    • Research and Development
      • $22 billion “defense-wide” to be used at the discretion of the Secretary of Defense
      • $10.6 billion for Army
      • $18 billion for Navy
      • $37.4 billion for Air Force
    • $34.4 billion for the Defense Health Program
    • $1.8 billion for the ‘‘Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Train and Equip Fund’’
  • Energy
    • $2.3 billion for energy efficiency improvement and renewable energy programs
    • $1.2 billion for nuclear energy
    • $726 million for fossil fuel research and development
    • An instruction to limit the sale of crude from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to no more than $350 million to go to the “Energy Security and Infrastructure Modernization Fund”
    • $10.6 billion for nuclear weapons facilities
    • $2 billion for nonproliferation facilities
    • $1.6 billion for Navy nuclear reactors
    • $6 billion for environmental cleanup facilities and property purchases
  • Treasury
    • IRS ~$11 billion
      • $2.5 billion for taxpayer services
      • $4.9 billion for enforcement
      • $3.6 billion for operational support
  • For the District of Columbia
    • $40 million for tuition support
    • $13 million for security costs
    • $265 million for D.C. courts
    • $45 million for school improvement
    • $5 million for AIDS treatment
    • $14 million for water and sewer
  • General Services Administration
    • $9 billion for property management  and related activities
    • $26.5 million for the Office of the Special Counsel
    • $1.6 billion for the Securities and Exchange Commission
  • Homeland Security
    • $13 billion for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)
      • $1.57 billion for border fencing, but the provision explicitly limits what type of fencing and where it can be constructed or repaired. None of the new border wall prototype designs may be used to build a wall on the southern border using this Act’s funds.
    • $7 billion for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
    • $7.2 billion for Transportation Security Administration (TSA)
    • $11.8 billion for Coast Guard
    • $1.9 billion for U.S. Secret Service
    • $4.4 billion for FEMA
    • $7.9 billion for the Disaster Relief Fund
    • $203 million for National Flood Insurance Fund
  • Department of the Interior
    • $1.2 billion for Bureau of Land Management
    • $1.3 billion for Fish and Wildlife Service
    • $2.5 billion for the National Park Service
    • $2.4 billion for Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education
    • $4 billion for Indian Health Service
  • Department of Labor
    • $3.49 Billion for training and employment services
    • $1.7 billion for the Jobs Corps
    • $790 million for federal unemployment
    • $552 million for OSHA
  • Health and Human Services
    • $284.8 Billion for Medicaid grants to the states
    • $323.5 billion for health care trust fund payments
    • $1.9 billion for Refugee and Entrant Assistance
    • $12 billion for children and family services programs
    • $5.2 billion for Child Care and Development block grants to the states
    • $1.7 billion for social services block grants to the states
    • $6.2 billion for foster care payments
    • $1.6 billion for health resources and services for primary health care
    • $1 billion for the health workforce
    • $2.3 billion for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program
    • $5.7 billion for National Cancer Institute
    • $3.4 billion for National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
    • $1.9 billion for National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
    • $2.1 billion for National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
    • $2.8 billion for National Institute of General Medical Sciences
    • $5.3 billion for National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
    • $2.6 billion for National Institute on Aging
    • $1.4 billion for National Institute on Drug Abuse
    • $1.7 billion for National Institute of Mental Health
    • $4.9 billion for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    • $3 billion for Child Support Enforcement
    • $3.6 billion for low-income home energy assistance
  • Education
    • $16.4 billion for the Education of the Disadvantaged ($5.5 billion for July – Sept. 2018 and $10.8 billion for FY19)
    • $1.4 billion for Impact Aid
    • $5.2 billion for school improvement programs
    • $13.4 billion for special education ($3.8 billion for July-Sept. 2018 and $9.3 billion for FY 2019)
    • $3.6 billion for rehabilitation services
    • $1.8 billion for career, technical and adult education
    • $24 billion for student financial assistance
      • Pell Grant maximum raised to $5,035
    • $313 million for Historically Black College and University Financing Program
  • Social Security Administration
    • $38.5 billion for SSI Program
  • Veterans Affairs
    • $95.8 billion for compensation and pensions
    • $11.8 billion for readjustment/rehabilitation benefits
    • $ 51.1 billion for medical services ($2 billion added to FY18 current monies, $49.2 billion for FY19)
  • Department of State
    • $5.7 billion for Diplomatic and Consular Programs
    • $3 billion for  Global Health Programs
    • $3 billion for development assistance
    • $2.7 billion for international disaster assistance
    • $1.8 billion for economic support fund
    • $928 million for migration and refugee assistance
    • $410 million for the Peace Corps (international training and assistance)
    • $905 million for the Millenium Challenge Corporation (Global Anti-Poverty)
    • $951 million for international narcotics control
    • $665 million of international anti-terrorism and demining
    • $5.7 billion for the Foreign Military Financing program
      • $3.1 billion of which is for allocated for Israel
  • Transportation
    • $1 billion for Secretary’s office salaries and expenses
    • $1.5 billion for infrastructure investments
    • $155 million in subsidies to air carriers for to promote flights to underserved areas
    • FAA
      • $10.2 billion for FAA operations and expenses
      • $3.3 billion for facilities and equipment
      • $1 billion for airport grants-in-aid
    • Federal Highway Administration
      • $45 billion to pay obligations for Federal-aid highway and highway safety construction programs
      • $2.5 billion for highway infrastructure programs
      • $598 million for highway safety grants
    • Federal Railroad Administration
      • $15.9 billion for Safety and Operation
      • $593 million for infrastructure and safety improvements
      • $650 million for Northeast Corridor grants
      • $1.3 billion for national railroad passenger grants
    • $10.3 billion for the Federal Public Transportation Assistance Program
    • $834 million for transit infrastructure grants
    • $2.6 billion for capital investment grants
    • $150 million for D.C. area transit
  • Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
    • $22 billion for tenant-based rental assistance ($4 billion previously provided in 2017, $18 billion provided in this law)
      • $19.6 billion of which is for section 8 housing
    • $2.8 billion for the Public Housing Capital Fund
    • $4.6 billion for the Public Housing Operating Fund
    • $644 million for Native American Housing block grants
    • $3.4 billion for the Community Development Fund
    • $1.4 billion for the Home Investment Partnerships Program
    • $2.5 billion for homeless assistance grants
    • $400 million for project-based rental assistance
  • $333 million for FCC operations in FY 2019, $340 million in FY 2020. FY 2018 was provided in an earlier measure

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About R. Mitchell

Rich Mitchell is the editor-in-chief of Conservative Daily News. His posts may contain opinions that are his own and are not necessarily shared by Anomalous Media, CDN, staff or .. much of anyone else. Find him on twitter, facebook and

One comment

  1. Huge chunks of POS (D) kickback funding prior to the next election handed out by our CAN’T-RISE-TO-THE-LEVEL-OF-WORTHLESS uni-Party government (comprised of our idiot neighbors who needed a job).

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