Tag Archives: Whitney Houston

Sick Of Hearing About Whitney Houston

Whitney Houston sadly died an early death due to drug and alcohol abuse. A very gifted singer has died much too early due to her own behavior, but we can’t let it go at that. Now, all of a sudden we get a touching call from a multi-millionaire “Hollywood elite” for the government to take my tax money and stop drug addiction. One of the “rich and famous” abuses herself to death and I get to pay for the heartaches of her friends. I have two separate problems with this attitude.

The Blaze.com ran a story about the sorrow over the death of Whitney Houston and the touching item written by Jamie Lee Curtis in the Huffington Post. That is great that she says nice things about her friend, but stop there. Jamie Lee, express your condolences for yourself and let it go at that. After saying nice things she started in on Obama to “do something”. In “rich and famous” lingo that is take the money from the serfs to solve a problem.

How many millions of dollars does Jamie Lee Curtis have? How many millions of dollars does Michael Moore have? How any millions of dollars do Sean Penn and Danny Glover have? If Jamie Lee Curtis, or any of the rest of them want something done about drug addiction among their peers ,why don’t they give all of THEIR millions to solve this issue among the “rich and famous”? Why should Curtis live among the “Top 1%” and tell Obama to take my hard earned money and give it to the Whitney Houston’s of the country? I wonder why the OWS occutards are protesting in Oakland and burning their own city down when they could actually go burn the homes of the real 1%’ers in Hollywood.

Jamie Lee, it isn’t your money you are crusading with, it is mine. I am among the lower income range but still pay income taxes, Social Security and Medicare taxes, along with every other tax to support a “War on Drugs” that has been going on for 50 years with nothing to show for it but billions of taxpayer dollars down the toilet of feel good projects like this one you demand. After all these years of taking my money for your touchy feely causes I am broke, our nation is broke; but your kind can still live life like it doesn’t cost anything. You can hide your money in various shelters, I can’t. It does cost for my family to live, and it costs a lot at our income range.
When are the bleeding hearts of this nation going to actually do something to help this great nation that has made them hundreds of millions of dollars and allowed them a lifestyle not even remotely possible for most of the citizens of America. Talk about out of touch with reality!!! The “rich and famous” always come out of the woodwork when an actor, singer, or whatever dies tragically and begin demanding the government do something about social issues among their peers. Do they actually NEED the welfare from me and my kind? When I believe in a cause, and can afford to, I donate to it. But it is my money I give, not someone else’s money.

I have also noticed many of the bleeding-heart 1%’ers showing up at various “Occupy” events stirring up hatred for the “rich”. It is sad that the occutards aren’t smart enough to realize that they are being egged on by some of the richest people in America. The occutards want my tax money to pay for everything they want and the uber-rich want my tax money to pay for all of their “heartfelt causes”. There isn’t any need to leave anything for my family to live on. We are expected to give everything we have and just go demand something from government like they do.

Now we have Jamie Lee Curtis putting on a sob story about a person who had everything, looks, voice, career, hundreds of millions of dollars, and mobs of adoring fans. And what did this super-star do with her life? Died in a bathtub in a drug and alcohol induced stupor. Why is it suddenly the responsibility of the government to “do something”? Why don’t all of these “caring” Hollywood types get out of their mansions, jet planes, and stretch limos at “gala” events; and pay for some of this themselves?

It is so easy for the ivory tower sitters in Washington D C and Hollywood to sit in their palaces and tell me where my meager income should be spent, but I notice they don’t do much more than tell me how they need to use my hard earned money. Personal responsibility has to come into the mix somewhere or it is a lost cause. The reason the “War on Drugs” and the “War on Poverty” don’t work is that there is no personal responsibility expected. Just call them diseased animals and require that I pay for their upkeep. If you want a memorial to Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, or any other entertainer, provide it yourself because I don’t care about them, they had more than enough to live a grand life but they abused themselves into an early death. You want something done, do it with your money and leave mine alone.

As for me, I would rather spend my money to protect the borders of this nation; to help the families of soldiers lost in battle; to provide the medical needs of wounded warriors, and to help those truly in need and willing to help themselves. Use my tax money for these righteous purposes to help those who aren’t among the wealthiest. Don’t take my tax money and give it to an industry known for drug and alcohol abuse, physical abuse of spouses, adultery, and overall demonic behavior. Don’t make some grand speech about the “horror of drug addiction” and direct Obama to my wallet.

There is help out there for those who truly want to be delivered from their addictions. Personal responsibility is the key to cure, not money. For those who are willing to work and do what is necessary to recover, I am with them. For those who just want to throw money at a problem without the key ingredient, I am not with them. You can’t make sugar cookies without sugar and you can’t overcome any issue without the desire, the drive, and the willingness to do what is required to be successful.

So to Jamie Lee Curtis and all the other hoot owls out there who demand the government confiscate my money for their “cause”, Zip it and leave my money alone. Do whatever you wish with your money and let me spend what little I have as I wish.

I submit this in the name of the Most Holy Trinity, in faith, with the responsibility given to me by Almighty God to honor His work and not let it die from neglect.

Bob Russell
Claremore, Oklahoma
February 16, 2012

Broken Celebrities Should Never Become Our Idols

This week my Facebook page and Twitter timeline has been filled with posts of sadness, anger, disappointment and tributes to the late music star, Whitney Houston.  Many spoke of her angelic voice, her tumultuous marriage to pop star Bobby Brown, and her sad struggle with addiction.   For days the news cycle was all Whitney Houston all the time.

All the attention got me to thinking about the culture of celebrity.  Celebrities are the most celebrated among us.  We voraciously consume personal information and photos of our favorite public figures.  We buy tabloid magazines filled with outrageous claims about celebrity baby-mommas and illicit behaviors.  We hang on their every word.  Reporters stick microphones in their faces and ask about the latest political scandal, deficit spending or green energy and stand rapt while people like Leonardo DiCaprio and Sean Penn complain about rich white people, Republicans and oil. We elevate their responses as if these people are the most intelligent in our society.

It is a sad state of affairs when we care more about what Ashton Kutcher thinks about our tax policies than what the harried parents of four kids think about the policies that affect how they will feed and clothe family and put gas in the car on a daily basis…because here’s the thing about celebrities that I don’t think most americans understand – they are broken people.  I don’t mean just a little off, or people who struggle with the ups and downs of life the way we all do.  I mean these are severely broken people.  I’ve been a trained actress for over 20 years. I’ve never reached the level of public success of an Angelina Jolie, but I’ve worked with a lot of different people in my life, some well-known, others not.  I’ve had the opportunity to live and work around actors and entertainers on a full-time basis.  The entertainment industry draws people from all walks of life and all geographical areas, but they all have one thing in common – a crippling insecurity that can only be satiated by public adoration and attention.  Yes, its true. I know it to be true because I have also been a victim of this sad mentality.  These are people who suffer from “holes” in their personalities, caused by tragic childhoods, loss or abuse.  It’s difficult to trust people close to you, so its hard to find validation in a few healthy relationships.  The love and attention of strangers meets the need for validation and intimacy (for a time, anyway) without requiring one to form a real relationship or be vulnerable.  It is an addiction like any other. It feels like the only thing that can keep you from hating yourself the way you do on a regular basis.

Now, imagine being this person with crippling insecurities and self-hatred.  Suddenly you are thrust into the spotlight.  It seems exciting at first; something you’ve always dreamed about.  People hang on your every move, your every word; they rush to fill your every need. No one ever tells you no.  There is always someone there to tell you how great, how wonderful, how intelligent, how attractive you are.  But you still hate yourself.  You still look in the mirror and see imperfections.  You know (feel) you don’t deserve anyone’s love or adoration.  Slowly, all the attention becomes like sharp razor blades.  Each compliment is another cut to your soul, because you know it’s all a lie. You can never live up to this image of perfection that has been created for you.  In your mind you deserve to be hated for being such a fake, and yet people just keep on celebrating you.  Soon it becomes impossible to handle. This is when many celebrities turn to drugs and alcohol to ease the discomfort of life under the microscope.  It’s an attempt to drown out the raging contradictions in the lifestyles they live.  We’ve seen time after time how quickly those chemical comforts spiral out of control.

It seems so glamorous, but it’s actually a very sad life.  Once you start examining the motivations of most entertainers it becomes clear how very broken and empty many of these celebrities are, and yet we place them on a pedestal and aspire to be like them and think like them.  We mourn when they leave us without recognizing just how skewed was their view of the world and themselves.  These are not people we should be getting our political views from, nor our values.  These are just people – lost, broken people who are looking for love and acceptance in quantities large enough to kill the voices of doubt in their heads.

I am as sad as the next person about the loss of Houston.  Her music was a huge part of my childhood and her talent cannot be denied or diminished.  But I hesitate to make her death somehow more important than the loss of anyone else we might care for and love.  She was a broken vessel.  She sought acceptance and found it among her fans, but she never learned to accept herself.   Let’s not ascribe more value to the opinions of the rich and famous than they are worth. Let’s not pretend their lives are worth more than our own. We can thank them for their talent and entertainment, but we should not allow them to lead us in our thoughts and actions.  It’s like driving a car with faulty transmission – the body might look good but under the hood it’s a big old mess and you are likely to break down completely before you reach your final destination.

 

Crossposted at kiradavis.net