Tag Archives: university

Institutions of Higher learning… About SEX!

My Professor?

If you’re like most parents you want what’s best for your kids.  You want them to get the kind of education that will help them get have a great life and a good, steady job where they love what they do and have a chance to advance.

And like most parents, other than that initial trip to visit college campuses with your kids, you didn’t really check out all the little “extras” that they will learn while away at school!

One expects that institutions of higher learning (you know, our wonderful university and colleges throughout the country) that, in many cases, are subsidized by our tax dollars, would focus on teaching the foundations required for our children to excel in their chose field of study.

When they enter the universities as young adults, we hope the knowledge they gain will help prepare them for the real world and teach them to be an adult, show up on time, be engaged and involved in school, in classes, and so on. Right?

Unfortunately, a majority of the colleges in our fine education system are run by some very left-leaning, progressive, socialist Americans. Follow me here.

I expect colleges to hand out information at the beginning of the school year about “Dealing with the anxiety of attending college”, “How to manage your time”, and “How to study”. But if you plan on attending the College of Charleston, one of the first introductions you will receive is “Find your Erotic self”… in comic book form! This comic book is a memoir about a woman coming to terms with her sexual identity and her closeted gay father who had a relationship with an underage male babysitter.

This is “reality”? This helps prepare our young adults for the “real world”? What does that have to do with entering college and excelling in a career? Shouldn’t I find “myself” before I find my “erotic self”? How about I find my dorm room first and then the bookstore? A grocery store would be nice and even the nearest clinic or dry cleaner. Somewhere, about 400 items down on the list, might be what’s in the comic book that explores gender and sexuality issues.

Apparently, the college thinks this is one of the first things that every incoming freshmen needs. Do you suppose they shared that “welcome packet” with the parents when they came for that school site visit, before they signed on the dotted line for all that tuition? Doubtful. One of the directors at the school said, “This book will open important conversations about identity, diversity, sexuality and finding one’s place in the world.” Newsflash… this is a professor who could be teaching your son or daughter!

What they are really trying to impart is that no matter what the young person was taught at home, no matter what their moral compass or religious belief is, they need to check out their erotic side, sleep with members of the same sex, pretend you’re a man when you have female parts, you get the gist. The college believes you need to explore this “real world knowledge” to be successful in life. In what universe?!

Isn’t it more important to teach these kids how to cope with being away from home for the first time? That they need to push themselves to do well and excel in life? That they need to choose their friends wisely? Why is it that the “educated left” thinks anyone with moral values or a religious belief is backwards?

The board at the University of Connecticut recently unanimously voted to forbid “amorous, intimate, or sexual contact” between school faculty and students. Wait! This wasn’t already a rule? And if not, why wouldn’t it be? Forget about the sexual issues, how about the moral issues? Does the student get a better mark depending on how many dates there are? Or how the student kisses? Or even how they perform sexually? And what happens if/when there is a breakup? Isn’t it just common sense to keep things professional?

Not in the world of higher learning. It took finding out a teacher had had sexual relations with many students over his many years at the college. For him, it was like shooting fish in a barrel. These campuses are supposed to be safe places where we entrust our children to be educated.

Colleges now have courses on sex and sexual behavior, the proper sex tool and how to use it, how to have safe sex (even bestiality), and how to navigate pornography. Harvard University sanctions a “Hook Up Week” where they encourage students to blow off steam by engaging in their raw, sexual desires.

I guess “Do your homework day”, “Return your books to the library day”, “Help out another student week”, and “volunteer at the local food bank month” are out of the question. Why do we have to pollute the college experience with immorality and encourage unbridled sexual behavior?

Having a mindset of “free love and free sex” and exploring any and every sexual thought is dangerous. Having a healthy fear of and respect for God and a solid moral compass is healthy. Check out the stats. It proves me right.

University seeks to limit free speech with ‘inclusive language’ campaign

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1332947117-free-speech-zoneAdministrators at the University of Maryland are using a $15,000 grant to prod students toward using politically correct language. The idea for the campaign was born when a staff member reported hearing “non-inclusive” language and apparently though the situation warranted behavior modification.

“I think so far it has created some interesting conversations on campus,” the employee said.

Though colleges are hotbeds of knee-jerk leftism, I’m sure at least some of those “interesting conversations” center around the nerve of any individual deciding which words are acceptable and which are not.

Obviously, profane and outright hurtful language should not be used in polite society and almost any individual without a psychopathic disorder do not need to be reminded of this fact.

Campaigns such as this one, though, seek to silence anyone using phrases – regardless of intent – the left deems insensitive. Some examples of problematic language, according to signs posted around campus, include “illegal alien,” “that’s so ghetto,” and “no homo.”
Leave it to a self-identified Libertarian and president of the university organization Students for Liberty to accurately describe this campaign by campus thought police.

“It is important to be civil with one another but this goes too far in taking language that most people would not find offensive and making us feel guilty for using it,” he said.

He said in order to perpetuate the First Amendment right to free speech on American campuses “requires the ability to say things without guilt.” Unfortunately, guilt is one of the few weapons the leftists in charge of most universities have in their arsenal – and what a highly effective weapon it is!

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Research Shows Universities and Colleges Are Missing Out on Critical Revenue Stream

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New research suggests that higher education institutions need more focus on providing relevant offerings in order to capitalize on corporate education and training dollars

 TORONTO, May 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Destiny Solutions, the leading innovator of lifelong learning business solutions, today announced the results of a research project commissioned to bring additional attention to the market potential of corporate partnerships for higher education institutions.

The research, which is available on the Destiny Solutions website, reveals that although 95 percent of corporations have systems in place to financially support employee education, only a fraction of that spending goes to colleges and universities. The research suggested that this is due in large part to the fact that colleges and universities are out of touch with the needs of corporations looking to develop their workforce, seeing as only 16 percent of employers said that there is an adequate availability of programs tailored to their needs.

“Given the budget crises higher education is currently experiencing, capitalizing on this market could provide an invaluable revenue source for many colleges and universities,” said Shaul Kuper, president and CEO of Destiny Solutions. “By responding to corporate needs, institutions will not only be able to increase revenue, but they will also be able to better equip students with the skills they need on the job.”

With the rapid pace of advancement in today’s markets, education can no longer be a one-time event, with 70 percent of corporations stating that employees need continuous education and training just to keep up with the pace of their job. However, there are many different options for education, ranging from internally run training departments to tuition reimbursement programs, to corporate partnerships with colleges or universities.

Additionally, low participation rates in tuition reimbursement programs and low success rates of internally developed programs suggest that partnerships with colleges and universities provide one of the most impactful and lucrative options for both the corporation and the institution. Nonetheless, low satisfaction rates with the scope and availability of programs provided by institutions have meant that only 9 percent of corporations surveyed have formalized partnerships, leaving a large percentage of the market untapped by colleges and universities and open for competition.

“Research shows that corporations are spending billions of dollars each year to educate their employees, and they want to be sure that programming is relevant and cost-effective,” Kuper said. “Higher education institutions are being presented with a golden opportunity to transition the workforce, the community and the education system into the 21st century.”

To download the research paper, please visit: http://www.destinysolutions.com/2012-research-voice-employer-effects/

 

Is Higher Ed to Blame for the Plight of the Occupiers?

While speaking at a recent EDUCAUSE Conference, higher ed journalist, Anya Kamenetz, commented that “Occupy Wall Street is a referendum on the value of higher education.” Even though the rest of her presentation was rather interesting, this statement went on to occupy my thoughts.

The OWS crowd is angry. The 20-somethings in that movement resent the fact that they have college degrees, a tremendous amount of student loan debt, and no job. They want someone to blame for their frustration. Politicians push them to blame the banks and corporations or to blame the government, but there is also a tangible amount of frustration being directed at higher ed. After all, these institutions have promised that acquisition of a college degree will earn them a “better job” or “brighter future.” The academic experience should instead be marketed as what it really is: an enlightened path to the life you are ready to earn.

Beyond this fallacy in marketing, academic institutions are being improperly blamed. When looking at the recent college graduate who is struggling to jump-start his life, one must consider more than the possession of a college degree. Employers also look at level of workplace skill, industry knowledge, work ethic, reliability, diversity of experience, professional and personal references, and general likeability. All of these characteristics can be developed during college, but many students choose not to do the necessary work.

Mediocrity is rampant in classes I teach: students who repeatedly miss classes and deadlines, who refuse to purchase required textbooks, and many who disengage but never even bother to withdraw from the class (thereby forfeiting scholarship – i.e., someone else’s – money). They spend more time defending or making excuses than it would have taken to do the work. If these students are lucky enough to meet the bare minimum requirements, they finish the class with a C. They move on to the next class, where they will repeat the same behaviors, ultimately making mediocrity a habit.

Eventually, this C student graduates and then competes for a job against a student who worked harder and applied herself more and, as a result, graduated with a better chance of employment. The former student lacks motivation, work ethic, and sufficient knowledge, while the latter is more responsible, more motivated, and probably has numerous faculty recommendations to vouch for these traits.

What it comes down to is how hard the individual is willing to work. Yes, the cost of a college degree is a challenge and can seem inhibiting for many. But the existence of post-graduation debt and financial instability isn’t based solely on the high cost of a college degree. Plenty of students graduate with manageable debt or no debt at all. They are the ones who worked their way through college, did the work to identify scholarship resources while still in high school, or participated in work study programs. Their financially-frustrated counterparts wanted the full “college experience” but wanted to pay for it later, thereby accumulating immense student loan debt.

Having a college degree doesn’t guarantee we will be debt-free and gainfully employed any more than having a gym membership guarantees we will be thin and healthy. There is real work and sound decision-making that goes on behind the scenes to ensure that one leads to another.

I would encourage the Occupiers who want a career and financial security to get to the business of making that happen. They can start re-appropriating the time, energy, and voice being wasted in trash piles of city parks all over this country to begin to earn their place in the world of work. More directly, to the 15% of OWS protesters who are unemployed, I would say this…

Study the organizations you want to work for, and market yourself to them. Earn some solid recommendations from people whose opinions a potential employer will value. Take on an internship or volunteer in the industry in which you intend to work (the research shows internships almost always lead to full-time employment). Begin making connections with the movers and shakers in the business world instead of scorning them with chicken scratch on 99 cent poster boards. Earn their respect, and you will earn your future position.

As an added bonus to this hard work and sound decision-making, you will likely find yourself in a better position to pay down your debt and better equipped to manage your personal finances going forward. It’s about choices. Make the choice to better your situation instead of waiting around for someone else to fix it for you. And rather than dismiss your college experience as a waste of time, reflect on the intellectual return on investment you’re experiencing. Oh wait, that’s a free-market metaphor, and you probably skipped that class.