Tag Archives: Unions

National Labor Relations Board Ambushing the Workplace [Video]

A new set of regulations allows for some pretty scary tactics by unions.

The new regulations allow “snap” elections, prohibit employers from presenting a competing case to unionization, forbids businesses from involving legal counsel and forces employers to turn over private information on workers.

While recent rulings prevent the NLRB from providing worker’s information to political groups or telemarketers, it doesn’t prevent the “in-bed-with-Democrats” unions from doing the same.

Walmart Encourages Grinch Accusations

WalMart NerdWalmart is a corporation that generates strong opinion. Unions — and their wholly–owned subsidiary the Democrat Party — view Walmart as a rapacious corporation run by brutal overseers whose overriding goal is exploiting the working class.

Many Republican officeholders view Walmart as a corporation run by a bunch of cheap so–and–sos who won’t make large campaign contributions and hire refugees from the Clinton administration.

Unions hold annual protests just prior to Black Friday and attempt to convince millions of shoppers that the largest private employer in the US might have low prices, but it’s only because the corporation harvests employee organs to sell on the black market.

The protests are held nationwide and union employees, rented homeless and liberal voyeurs demand the corporation pay full–time employees a minimum of $25,000 per year. Democrat officeholders show solidarity by attempting to pick the corporation’s pocket with minimum wage laws that give government the power to tell business how much employees should be paid, without government having any responsibility for the bottom line.

It’s vote buying through extortion.

In the Nanny’s Republic of Washington, DC animosity toward Walmart was so high the city council passed a bill amusingly titled the Large Retailer Accountability Act. (I wait in vain for the Bad Leftist Ideas Accountability Act.) The bill would’ve required Walmart to pay 50 percent more than the city’s current minimum wage. In fact the amount was more than the minimum wage the DC government pays its employees!

Fortunately for Walmart shoppers, the mayor vetoed the bill.

So one might ask at a time when Walmart is viewed as a penny–pinching, soulless exploiter of the down–trodden, why would a store manager in Canton, OH arrange a crèche of plastic bins in the breakroom with a sign that read: “Please Donate Food Items Here, so Associates in Need Can Enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner.” I suppose it beats letting them dumpster dive, but the optics are bad.

When it comes time for the 2013 Bad Public Relations Ideas nominations, this will be hard to beat. Why not invite Occupy Wall Street to provide entertainment at the next stockholder’s meeting?

This only feeds the narrative of Grinch–like exploitation that the MSM, unions and Democrats work so hard to tattoo on Walmart’s corporate hide.

Even regular Walmart shoppers have mixed emotions. Just thinking about it conjures up associations with domestic drama in the parking lot, unfortunate fashion choices and dangerously high customer BMI.

Who hasn’t experienced that all too common Walmart shopping experience? You can’t find the item you want and you can’t find an employee to direct you to it. (I just assume all the on–duty workers are either manning the cash register or in back passing the hat.)

Even cemeteries have a higher ratio of employees to customers than your average Walmart store.

Which brings us back to: When there is such a cultural divide in opinion regarding your business, why do something that reinforces the negative side?

In fairness to the manager, the charity display was in the employees–only section and not outside next to the Salvation Army kettle, but regardless of location once the media becomes aware the damage is done.

And sure enough, anti–Walmart organizer Norma Mills, quoted on Cleveland.com, observes, “That Walmart would have the audacity to ask low-wage workers to donate food to other low-wage workers — to me, it is a moral outrage.”

When you compare this to Walmart’s profit in 2012, $17 billion, and the net worth of the Walton family, $144 billion, even the most dedicated shopper can’t help but wonder why the company can’t toss a turkey leg to deserving employees.

Unfortunately, the majority of that profit has been used in recent years to buy back Walmart stock, which is essentially financial onanism that creates nothing and only serves to enhance the value of stock the Walton family owns.

The WaPost had a story about a woman and her daughter who were struggling and homeless much of the time. The Post, as usual, ignores the choice the woman made that created the problem: having an out–of–wedlock child, a sure path to poverty. (This by the way is not blaming the victim. The victim is the child and none of it’s her fault.)

After that bad decision, the woman worked hard to turn her life around. She finally landed a job with the YMCA and found an apartment she could afford on her salary, but she couldn’t save enough for the security deposit.

Management at the Y heard about her problem and instead of asking the towel boys to hold a car wash for her, the Y gave the woman a salary advance and she got the apartment.

In the Cleveland.com story, spokesperson Kory Lundberg defends the company. “This is part of the company’s culture to rally around associates and take care of them when they face extreme hardships.” But that is not completely true. It is part of employee culture, not management culture.

According to Lundberg the company has a program called the Associates in Critical Need Trust. Walmart workers can receive grants of up to $1,500.00 to “address hardships they may encounter, including homelessness, serious medical illnesses and major repairs to primary vehicles. Since 2001, grants totaling $80 million have been made.”

Here’s the problem: Walmart takes credit for the charity and the concern, but it’s paid for by payroll deductions from the workers. Walmart needs to stop dunning employees for this money. The corporation should provide all the funding.

That way the company is really buying into Lundberg’s “culture.”

It is simply good business practice for management to demonstrate real concern for the staff. Putting the corporation’s money where the corporate mouthpiece is will go a long way toward blunting future attacks on the company. And that will help everyone — management, employees and stockholders.

Happy American Dream Day?

Most of you know today as Labor Day. What exactly is Labor Day? Sounds like a day to celebrate work, but it isn’t. Maybe it’s a day where we celebrate the ability for women to give birth? Nope, not that either.

Labor Day isn’t just a day off with pay. And it’s not BBQ at the beach or a celebration of the end of summer.

Actually, it’s a day for us to celebrate workers. But who really loves to work? Wouldn’t most people love to have enough money not to have to work? So, why do we celebrate the American worker?

Originally, Labor Day was an olive branch extended by President Grover Cleveland after he sent American troops in to stop the railroad workers strike and 12 workers were killed in the process. He gave them a day off (with pay?) to let things settle down. Cleveland’s olive branch withered and the celebration died away.

I appreciate the sacrifices that the American worker has made over the years to feed their families, buy homes and cars, provide their children’s education, and make a good life. But isn’t that what the American Dream is all about?

In the early days of America we had many shameful moments. Workers were taken advantage of. Working 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, being replaced permanently if they were out sick a day or two, and even plant workers being beaten for not working hard enough. Barbaric!

But that was then. America has come a long way. I’ll even give the unions credit for helping to make working conditions fair and give workers some protections. But somewhere along the way, like with any big corporation that disconnects from its people, they went bad. Yes, bad.

Workers’ salaries shouldn’t be based on what the company makes, it should be based on a fair days wage for a good days work. In most cases, the worker doesn’t lose his investments, 20 years of sweat, his home and cars if the company goes out of business. Business entrepreneurs very often do! Workers can usually get a job in the same industry. There is no real risk being an employee.

The owner of the company usually puts up his house, his name, his reputation, and all his assets to borrow money to start the company up and running. It’s the entrepreneur that comes up with the idea, figures out how to produce it, figures out how to bring it to market, and figures out how to make a profit on it so he can hire the laborer. Then the laborer can show up do his job, feed his family, afford a house, and so on. Once in a while, one of those workers rises up, figures out how to do it better, starts their own company, and becomes an entrepreneur. That’s the real American dream… freedom to make money to live comfortably after hard work and ingenuity! Sadly, that’s also what the unions seem to hate the most, entrepreneurs.

It’s unclear who the brainchild behind Labor Day was. Many credit Labor Day to Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor. Others have suggested that Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, first proposed the holiday. Either way, it was union officials making a big deal out of union workers.

What about all the other American workers? Maybe we could rename it to “American Dream Day” and celebrate the fact that we have the freedom choose our profession and where we work. We can choose to start our own business, to own a house and a car, to get a good education, and to move freely about the country. Yes, we can simply work for someone and enjoy the American Dream.

Let’s celebrate the American worker and the American entrepreneur, not just union workers.

Anyone can make it in this country… anyone! No excuses. You make it or you fail because of your ability, your tenacity, and how bad you want it and are willing to work for it.

I don’t celebrate the union worker, I celebrate all Americans who work hard to obtain the American Dream and “make it big” and those who work hard to enjoy the freedoms they have here. Happy American Dream Day!

Obamacare Fall Out: Roofers Union Wants Repeal

ROOFERS UNION SEEKS REPEAL/REFORM OF AFFORDABLE CARE ACT

WASHINGTON, DCROOFERS’ UNION SEEKS REPEAL/REFORM OF AFFORDABLE CARE ACT

Cites Loss of Benefits to Members; Harm to Industry and Multi-employer Health Plans

Washington, DC – United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers International President Kinsey M. Robinson issued the following statement on April 16, 2013, calling for a repeal or complete reform of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Our Union and its members have supported President Obama and his Administration for both of his terms in office.

But regrettably, our concerns over certain provisions in the ACA have not been addressed, or in some instances, totally ignored. In the rush to achieve its passage, many of the Act’s provisions were not fully conceived, resulting in unintended consequences that are inconsistent with the promise that those who were satisfied with their employer sponsored coverage could keep it.

These provisions jeopardize our multi-employer health plans, have the potential to cause a loss of work for our members, create an unfair bidding advantage for those contractors who do not provide health coverage to their workers, and in the worst case, may cause our members and their families to lose the benefits they currently enjoy as participants in multi-employer health plans.

For decades, our multi-employer health and welfare plans have provided the necessary medical coverage for our members and their families to protect them in times of illness and medical needs. This collaboration between labor and management has been a model of success that should be emulated rather than ignored. I refuse to remain silent, or idly watch as the ACA destroys those protections.

I am therefore calling for repeal or complete reform of the Affordable Care Act to protect our employers, our industry, and our most important asset: our members and their families.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal.

Twinkies strike back: Unions are weakening

After the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Gran Millers International Union attempted to extort Hostess out of unfair and expensive concessions, union workers will be left out of jobs as twinkies return to production.

NBCNEWS.COM reports that “Twinkies are coming back—but under a new management that vows to use nonunion workers.”

A third of Hostess’ production was union labor, but after union members struck, the manufacturer had no choice but to close and reorganize.

Business experts like Alan James of Pace University say, “Unions have been very good in the past making sure we have benefits like maternity leave, but their leadership continues to think only of themselves and not their members.”

Doubting the value of unions, James continued saying “Why should I pay dues when I don’t see any positive results?’

History professor Daniel Opler feels that the Hostess showdown showed the weakness of unions.

“There’s no question the bakers union that rejected a settlement made a tactical error here,” he said.

Unions have pushed several showdowns in recent years. Often asking for concessions that would leave companies unable to compete.

States are empowering workers to ditch expensive union dues by enacting right-to-work laws and workers are supporting them in ever increasing numbers.

Business analyst James Alan said feels that low membership rates could indicate that unions are weakening.

Bought & Paid For, Part II

National and local unions have taken over the Minnesota legislature.

solidarity fistThe elections of 2012 saw an unprecedented $100 million dollars spent by large employee unions throughout the United States. More than $11 million of that money was spent in Minnesota. Bought and Paid For… Minnesota Legislature lists some of the powerful democrats who are pushing bills through legislative committees that are clearly inspired by various unions. Those same unions supported their campaigns through endorsements and financial contributions.

Expanding on the previous list, here is an investigation into the democrat members of the MN House Labor, Workplace and Regulated Industries Committee who have also been bought and paid for by employee unions.

Representative Sheldon Johnson: Chair of the Labor, Workplace and Regulated Industries Committee

Endorsed by AFSCME, MAPE, Teamsters, Education MN, MNA, IBEW, and various police, firefighter, building, trades, and transportation unions.

Johnson was a Union Steward for Teamsters 320.

Johnson has received the following campaign donations: $8,400 from public employee unions, $4,100 from civil servants/public officials, $3,000 from building trade unions, and another $3,700 from miscellaneous unions.

Representative Mike Sundin: freshman legislator and Vice Chair of the Labor, Workplace and Regulated Industries Committee

Endorsed by AFSCME, AFL-CIO, IBEW, MN Farmers Union, Teamsters, United Transportation Union, Education MN, and 11 other unions.

Sundin is a professional painter and was part of the Internation Union of Painters and Allied Tradees (IUPAT).

Representative Peter Fischer: freshman legislator

Endorsed by AFSCME, AFL-CIO, MNA, MAPE, Education MN, Teamsters.

In his final campaign finance report submitted in January 2013, Fischer reported donations in excess of $4,000 from unions including IBEW, Education MN, MAPE, Iron Workers and more.

Representative Carolyn Laine: Vice Chair of MN House Early Childhood and Youth Development Policy Committee which already passed the forced unionization bill

Endorsed by AFSCME, SEIU, IBEW, AFL-CIO, Teamsters, MAPE, United Transportation Union, various police, firefighters, nurses and farmers unions

Received 42% of campaign donations from out-of-state sources.
Received more than $8,000 in campaign contributions from unions.

Represenative Shannon Savick

Received the following donations for her 2012 campaign:
SEIU $250
Education MN $450
IBEW $700
Joint Council 32 (Teamsters) $500
MAPE $250
AFL-CIO $250
MNA $500
Laborers Council of MN & ND Pol Fund $500
United Food and Commercial Workers Union $500

Representative Michael Nelson: Professional carpenter for 22 years before working directly for a carpenters union in 2000

Representative Erik Simonson

Endorsed by AFSCME, AFL-CIO, Firefighters unions, and building/construction trades unions.

Over $3500 in Simonson’s 2012 campaign contributions were from city and state employees.

15 employee unions donated more than $6,300, including $500 from AFSCME, $250 from AFL-CIO, $200 from Public Employee Services Association, and $250 from Education MN.

Representative Sandra Masin

Endorsed by AFSCME, Education MN, SEIU, AFL-CIO, Joint Council 32 DRIVE (Teamsters), MAPE, Police and Peace Officers Union, Council of Carpenters, United Transportation Union, St. Paul Building Construction Trades Council, MNA.

Campaign contributions from AFSCME, SEIU, MAPE, Education MN and others totaled $4,000 in Masin’s 2012 campaign.

Representative Jason Metsa: currently employeed as Field Coordinator for North East Area Labor Council

11 employee unions contributed to Metsa’s 2012 campaign. Northern Central States Carpenters union contributed $500 and Virginia Eveleth Carpenters Local #606 donated $300.

The MN House Labor, Workplace and Regulated Industries Committee heard the introduction and testimony on the forced unionization of in-home child care business owners today and is expected to pass the bill onto the House floor later in the session. Both AFSCME and SEIU will see an influx of thousands of new members should the bill pass making private business owners employees of the State of Minnesota.

The information for this article was obtained via the MN Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board and individual candidate campaign websites. Some endorsement and other information was obtained from ProjectVoteSmart.org.
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Author of the MN Senate version of the child care provider unionization bill is Senator Sandy Pappas. What are her ties to unions? What happened in her committee: Read here: It’s Payback Time
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Dear Hostess Workers, How’s that Job Search Coming?

Hostess twinkiesThe buyout firms Apollo Global Management, LLC and Metropoulos & Co. have agreed to purchase the Hostess and Dolly Madison cake brands, including Twinkies. Recall that after the Hostess company closed its plants and declared bankruptcy after its unions went on strike in November.

The proposed buyout includes the brands, bakeries and some of the equipment but requires bankruptcy court approval before the sale will be final.

The new buyers promise to bring back the popular Hostess products including Twinkies, Ding Dongs, and HoHos. They also state that they will be providing jobs around the country. However, it is unknown how many of the 18,500 former Hostess workers will find work as the buyers plan to outsource distribution and produce snacks in existing bakeries causing union promises of replacement jobs to be in question.

Read more at ABC.com.

 

Union Membership Plummets

unions

It’s not your dad’s union anymore. The strength of the unions during the 50’s or 80’s is long gone.

The nation’s labor unions suffered sharp declines in membership last year, led by losses among public sector workers in financially struggling states and municipalities. According to the Bureau of Labor union rates are at the lowest level since the 1930’s. Union membership fell in 34 states.

Total union membership decreased by about 400,000 workers with teachers’ unions hardest hit. Public sector union worker numbers dropped though due in large part to cash strapped cities and localities reducing staff.

Detroit News: Michigan accounted for about 10 percent of the nation’s loss of unionized workers as the Wolverine State fell to the seventh most-unionized state, from fifth in 2011.

In Michigan, union membership fell more sharply than the national average; It was down to 16.6 percent in 2012, compared with 17.5 percent in 2011. Michigan lost 42,000 union workers, falling to 629,000 in 2012.

Union administration in states like Wisconsin and Michigan are bracing for additional union member loss as new state laws moving toward ‘right to work’ status take effect. Promoters of the unions remind workers that union worker wages remain higher than nonunion. Others, particularly looking at public sector benefits, including pensions are pushing for changes that will allow the cities to reduce their debt to retired employees.
Read more at:  Detroit News.

Chicago Teachers Union President: ‘Off With Their Heads!’

Oh, the tolerance that oozes from the hypocritical leftists!

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis giving the keynote speech at the Illinois Labor History Society’s 2012 Union Hall of Honor, where she talks about the 19th Century Union leaders being “ready to kill” those who opposed the unions in that day. When someone claps, she seems to get a bit nervous, saying that she doesn’t think we are at that point today, “but the key is that they think nothing about killing us.”

Abject union thuggery

Screen Shot 2012-12-17 at 1.00.32 AM

We’ve all seen the video of the Lansing, Michigan union protests.  They’re mad that Gov. Rick Snyder passed a right-to-work law, which would curtail the power unions have in the state.  It’s Wisconsin reloaded.  However, the level of thuggery and violence has reached a whole new level.  Union supporters thought that they could really make a difference in this debate by tearing down an Americans for Prosperity tent, which was located outside the state capitol building.  The tent had women and children inside – and one union supporter assaulted conservative commentator and Fox News contributor Steven Crowder multiple times during the chaos.  Crowder has been receiving death threats ever since he dared to cover the event.

American for Prosperity released this statement to the press on December 11:

LANSING, Mich. – Americans for Prosperity – Michigan State Director Scott Hagerstrom today released the following statement in response to the passage of Right-to-Work legislation in Michigan:“The passage of Right-to-Work is a win/win for Michigan. Not only is this legislation critical to Michigan’s economic recovery, it is a victory for workers who for too long, have been forced to join and financially support a labor union.

“This is also a win for union protestors, even though they might not know it yet, as they will have the freedom to choose to join a union, and will no longer be forced. I commend Michigan lawmakers who courageously stood up, despite union intimidation and violence, for worker rights. “This is about giving private-sector and public-sector union members in Michigan more rights, not less, by allowing workers to chose whether or not to join a union and how their hard-earned dollars are spent. At the end of the day, Right-to-Work legislation gives workers more freedom and more rights. Isn’t that what democracy looks like?

“Despite this victory, it took place amid union brutality and violence. I am saddened by union protestors’ complete disregard for safety and freedom of speech, tearing down an AFP tent and stomping on peaceful AFP demonstrators trapped under the tent.

“Angry, violent union protestors are yelling, screaming, and physically assaulting citizens they disagree with all while chanting “this is what democracy looks like.” That isn’t what democracy looks like, democracy is about free speech and peaceful assembly, not putting people’s well-being in danger just because you disagree with them.”

AFP-Michigan has taken the lead on rallying grassroots activists to contact their legislators in support of right-to-work legislation. Hundreds of activists have met with their lawmakers to stress the importance of this issue, and thousands have phoned in their support for workplace freedom.

Now, AFP released footage of attendees underneath the tent, as they tried to keep it came crashing down.

So, as unions throw a temper tantrum over their loss of political clout, they decide to take it out on decent Americans, who happen to disagree with them on the issue of labor.

O’Doyle Rules!

Do Union Organizers Want Us to Dislike Them?

union cardThough most of the news coverage in Michigan this week has been tepid, showing calm crowds protesting quietly, a few intrepid journalists entered the protest area and filmed a far more violent and angry mob. (Even Huffington Post had to admit things got more than a little out of hand when Conservative Steven Crowder was punched, not once, but four times when he dared to question the protestors. You can see the video here.)

Also this week there is a union protest in Philadelphia by electricians who did not get an apartment renovation job. But again, not a quiet march with pickets, these protesters are blaring a loud recorded message that includes an annoyingly long crying jag by a fussy baby. The electricians are protesting the use of a non-union contractor to do electrical work on renovations at the apartment building. Residents say they have nothing against organized labor making a point, but this?

“I know everybody says they’ve got their rights,” says longtime apartment resident Jean Smith, “and that’s fine. But don’t we have rights too, that we have to hear this constantly- every day?”
“The crying of the baby- it doesn’t give them no sympathy,” says apartment dweller David Dickson. “It’s not helping them.”

At a time when unions seem to be losing their strength one would think, no expect, that they would promote themselves in a positive light, explaining to the public why they can be helpful to the average worker. Instead incidents like these examples beg the question, do union organizers really want us to dislike them?
Philadelphia News, Weather and Sports from WTXF FOX 29

Free Michigan

Michigan is now the 24th right to work state in America.

Public workers in Michigan are now free to work without being forced to pay legalized extortion to unions as a precondition of their employment.

As union labor gathered by the thousands, Michigan’s legislature voted approval Tuesday to “right-to-work” legislation.  The House and the Senate both approved the measure, making membership and payment of union dues optional.  Governor Rick Snyder has promised to sign it into law.

More than 12,000 protestors from around the Midwest gathered for the vote.  Union thugs dissatisfied with the vote attacked the Americans for Prosperity tent, tore it down and slashed it apart with knives while members of AFP were still inside.

Union promised there will be more to come.

From the floor of the Michigan House of Representatives, Democratic State Representative State Representative Douglas Geiss threatened “There will be blood.”

Barack Obama described the legislation thusly:  “These so called right-to-work laws, they don’t have anything to do with economics, they have to do with politics.”

This is coming from someone whose entire position on the so-called fiscal cliff negotiations in Washington DC has nothing to do with economics.  It is all about politics.  It is all about destroying the Republican Party and promoting a patently un-American fringe Marxist ideology.

Michigan’s right-to-work law makes it illegal to require financial support of a union as a condition of employment.  When it comes to recruiting businesses to Michigan it will make the state more competitive.  Critics claim it will cripple the ability of unions to fund their political policy objectives.

Unions are forgetting some fundamental principles.  No one should be forced against their will to join a union or to have their paycheck skimmed by unions.  If someone disagrees with their politics, no one should be forced to fund union politics.

For “progressives”, who lay claim to sole possession of concern for working people, forcing Americans who object to their political policy objectives to fund then as a precondition of employment is hypocrisy in the most classic sense.

Hypocrisy, when it comes to speaking about “progressives”, is par for the course.

It is morally right for workers to have the power of decision where it comes to supporting labor unions financially.  People should have the right to work without being forced to pay union dues.  Americans who want to work should not be enslaved by unions.

http://mjfellright.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/free-michigan/
Revolution is coming.

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