Tag Archives: Texas

Misrepresenting The “Fetal Heartbeat” Texas Bill

Geoff Livingston (CC)

Geoff Livingston (CC)

 Certain parts of the Internet went started frothing at the mouth on Thursday and Friday over another Texas abortion bill. Think Progress wrote, Republicans were looking “criminalize abortion services after a fetal heartbeat can be detected.” Huffington Post wrote the glaring headline, “Six-Week Abortion Ban Introduced In Texas.” Salon said the bill would “face harsh criticism and fierce opposition from the thousands of Texans rallying against the Republican-controlled Legislature’s efforts to eliminate access to safe abortion care in the state.” Raw Story had a similar post.

 There are two problems with how House Bill 59 is being characterized:

  1. The bill won’t be debated this year: Republican State Representative Phil King released a statement saying there aren’t any hearings planned on the measure, and the bill won’t be considered until January 2015.

  2. The bill will probably never be law: The key text of the bill can be found in Section Two, where it says the subchapter can’t be enforced until the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe vs. Wade; a federal or state court restores, expands or clarifies the authority the states have on abortion; or an amendment to the U.S. Constitution is passed restoring, expanding or clarifying the authority the states have on abortion.

 The Supreme Court isn’t expected to decide on abortion ever again, and it’s unlikely a Constitutional amendment will ever be passed. To Think Progress and Salon’s credit, they have edited their stories to point out Section Two of the bill. HuffPost and Raw Story have not.

 Similar outrage happened with Texas House Bill 2, where opponents claimed all abortion would be banned after 20 weeks and almost all abortion clinics in Texas would have to close. However, Subsection 171.046 says abortion can be done if “in the physician’s reasonable medical judgment,” there is a condition that affects the woman’s health or the child has severe fetal abnormality. Section 11, part b gives clinics until September 2014 to meet the new standards or else they won’t be allowed to perform abortions.

 It’s understandable the abortion issue (and any social issue) causes a ton of emotion. But people need to be armed with the facts, before debating the merits of a particular bill or law. If they don’t, then there’s no point to any debate because it will only end in harsh words, hurt feelings and damaged relationships.

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor July 13th 2013

sncl_logocdnWhen:Saturday, July 13th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radio

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Tonight Taylor talks with an old CDN friend, Moriah Jovan (@MoriahJovan) about her new book Dunham, and whatever else comes to mind. (With Moriah, you never do know where the conversation will lead, whether it’s to politics, publishing, or something else…) Expect at least a few comments on the sport otherwise known as Texas politics – in particular the abortion “debate” in Austin.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

 

 

 


Saturday Night Cigar Lounge July 6th

sncl_logocdnWhen:Saturday, June 29th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radio

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Taylor is back in Texas and loving it. Tonight he’s joined by Ashley Sewell (@TXTrendyChick) to talk the sport that is Texas politics, the abortion bills, Wendy Davis and David Murphy from the Texas Rangers.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

Abortion debate returns to Texas legislature

Governor Rick Perry has called another special session in Texas to consider the abortion issue again. Protesters on both sides of the debate swarmed around the state capital, in the hope of swaying the legislators inside.

As reported by the Washington Post:

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens


With 30 days and the majority of state lawmakers on their side, Republicans are almost assured success as they seek to pass restrictions that would ban abortions starting 20 weeks after fertilization and require clinics performing the procedure to meet costly new requirements that could put many of them out of business.

“The Texas Legislature is poised to finish its history-making work this year by passing legislation to protect the unborn and women’s health,” Gov. Rick Perry (R) said in a statement.

In the first special session, the measure didn’t make it to the Senate for final approval until the last day, giving state Sen. Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth) the window — and the national stage — to filibuster the measure to defeat.

“I was lucky enough to be able to make the choices in my life that I knew would work for me,” Davis told supporters Monday, responding to Perry’s suggestion that, as a teenage mother herself, she should’ve “learned from her own example.”

The new versions of the bill — House Bill 2 by state Rep. Jodie Laubenberg (R-Parker) and Senate Bill 1 by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy) — are headed for committee hearings.

The “costly new requirements”, if the new bills are similar to SB-5, include requirements that all clinics has physicians on staff that also have privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the facility, and increased accountability for the clinics and their employees to ensure the safety of patients. Additionally, all penalties are levied against physicians and clinics, not patients. SB-5 cited fetal pain as the purpose of the legislation. It was not mentioned that according to the pro-choice Guttmacher Institute, 1.5% of all abortions in 2006 were performed after the 20-week limit being considered in Texas, or that complications increase significantly the longer a woman waits to have an abortion.

The risk of death associated with abortion increases with the length of pregnancy, from one death for every one million abortions at or before eight weeks to one per 29,000 at 16–20 weeks—and one per 11,000 at 21 or more weeks.

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

While protesters against this legislation may want to claim that they are for women’s health, objecting to increased oversight and accountability in clinics does not exactly square with that ideal. Also, given the low number of women that tend to have abortions at that stage of pregnancy, and the increased probability of complications, including death of the woman, the argument tends to fall flat. After the Kermit Gosnell case in Pennsylvania, it would have been hoped that all women, regardless of their opinion on abortion, would want to do anything to prevent similar situations from happening again, which is exactly what the current bill under consideration would do. Time will tell, but if there are no significant changes on the floor in the Texas legislature, this measure will undoubtedly pass, and will not be stolen again by an unruly mob.

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge June 29th

When:Saturday, June 29th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radio

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Taylor is finishing up his move to Texas so Sean Venkman from Real Deal Talk Radio fills in. Big thanks to Sean for doing it and Taylor is planning on calling in.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

 

Abortion Rights Thugs Storm Texas Legislature; Block Vote On Limiting Abortions To 20 Weeks

Same old Pro-Death “activists”. Hey, let’s go filibuster the “outrage” of limiting abortions to 20 weeks and requiring those “clinics” to implement the same standards as any surgical center! YEA! That sounds like something that is right up there with Slavery! Hurry get your code pink outfits and meet at the Texas State Capitol!! Do these idiots know just how ridiculous they sound? Killing the unborn at any time is murder, but a woman who is 20 weeks pregnant—that’s 5 months pregnant, and they are protesting the “right” to slaughter that innocent child? Watch the video below. After “demonstrating” for over 10 hours, at 3am, the Republicans conceded the vote could not be finished on time.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, an Eagle Scout, ‘greatly disappointed’ with Boy Scouts’ gay ban lift

The Headquarters for Boy Scouts Of America is located in Irving, Texas.

Texas Governor Rick Perry earned the rank of Eagle Scout, as did his son Griffin. The Boy Scouts of America Organization honored Rick Perry with the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.

With the announcement yesterday that the Boy Scouts of America Organization has voted to open their membership to openly gay boys for the first time in history, Gov. Perry issued a statement.

AUSTIN – Gov. Rick Perry today issued the following statement regarding the vote to admit openly gay Boy Scouts:

Eric Gay/The Associated Press

Eric Gay/The Associated Press

 The Boys Scouts of America has been built upon the values of faith and family for more than 100 years and today’s decision contradicts generations of tradition in the name of political correctness. While I will always cherish my time as a scout and the life lessons I learned, I am greatly disappointed with this decision.

rick_perry_signature

CSCOPE is out of Texas schools

-Marlith- (CC)

-Marlith- (CC)


CSCOPE is officially stopping from distributing lesson plans in Texas, according to a report from the Houston Chronicle.

The state’s regional Education Service Centers will no longer issue lesson plans – and will forbid their use after Aug. 31 – for a popular online curriculum system that became a lightning rod for conservatives who criticized it as anti-American, legislators announced Monday.

The move is expected to leave school districts across the state, including some in the greater Houston area, scrambling to replace CSCOPE, as the program is called, before the start of next school year. Districts that lack the staff or budget to design their own curriculum tend to rely on it.

The CSCOPE plans are in use at 877 districts, or 78 percent of school districts in Texas, said Kyle Wargo, the executive director of Regional Service Center 17 in Lubbock.

“Since we are a small district, we don’t have the resources to hire specialized people in that area,” said Somerset Independent School District Superintendent Saul Hinojosa, who credits CSCOPE with helping the district raise its test scores.

However, while Hinojosa claims CSCOPE helped to increase test scores, that does not necessarily mean that it helps students learn. Debates over the efficacy of standardized tests as a metric to determine how well students learn continue to rage, and in Texas, there are at least some teachers that believe that the end of CSCOPE will mean a better learning environment for their students.

KLTV.com reports that many teachers despised CSCOPE’s rigid, one-size-fits-all approach to education. After seven years of CSCOPE, those teachers are thrilled to be set free from the tyranny of the ready-made lesson plan.

Bill Martin, director of the Tyler Sylvan Learning Center, said the end of CSCOPE means teachers “get control back over their classroom again.”

“They get to use lesson plans that they feel are best suited for their class and their students in their class,” Martin told KLTV.com.

Martin added that he doesn’t know “a single teacher that likes CSCOPE. Not a single teacher.”

If reports that parent requests to see CSCOPE materials were met with demands to pay exorbitant fees were true, the end of this program should also mean a return to school districts obeying Texas laws, requiring that parents be given course information and learning materials on request. Of course, to conservatives, this means the end of students being taught to compare Boston Tea Party Activists to terrorists.

Granbury, Tx. tornadoes – 6 dead, death toll could rise

Six are confirmed dead after severe storms and multiple tornadoes hit North Texas in the evening yesterday. Hardest hit was Granbury, Tx., where a sub-division of Habitat for Humanity homes were in the path of what from early reports, appears to have been EF-4 strength twister. There are still some people unaccounted for, and officials have stated it is possible that the death toll from this storm will rise.

Another tornado hit the city of Ennis, in Ellis County and Steve Howerton, the city manager and emergency management coordinator, released the following map showing the path of that tornado.

 

Ennis Tornado

Individuals with family or friends in the area are encouraged to use the following emergency contacts offered by DallasNews.com:

A phone bank was established for those looking for friends and family members in Hood County. Call (682) 498-8010. Alternatively, you can list yourself as “Safe & Well” or search for others that have listed themselves at the Safe & Well website operated by the American Red Cross.

Those who believe they may have a family member or friend at Lake Granbury Medical Center are being asked to call 817-579-2888.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has launched a Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990 to provide immediate crisis counseling to people affected by the violent storms across northern Texas.

Contact the Granbury Animal Clinic at (817) 573-5553 to see if a lost pet has been recovered.

New developments will be added as needed.

TX Cheerleaders Win 1st Amendment Victory

A Texas court judge ruled today that signs displayed by high school cheerleaders quoting biblical verses were cheerleaders “constitutionally permissible,” and that the Kountze High School cheerleaders could continue to display them at the school’s football games.

The high school cheerleaders had sued the Kountze Independent School District after after they were told they could no longer display the banners with religious messages over arguments that it violated the First Amendment. Earlier in the school year, one unidentified spectator had complained to the Freedom From Religion Foundation. The group argued that the banners amounted to a public school’s advocating a particular religion, which was unconstitutional.

The cheerleaders contention was that these banners were student led and initiated and so private speech. Attorneys for the cheerleaders argued the girls’ First Amendment rights to free speech were being violated by the school district and that the messages on the banners were not asking anyone to believe in Christianity or accept the faith.

In his ruling, State District Judge Steve Thomas said that no law “prohibits cheerleaders from using religious-themed banners at school sporting events and that the banners did not create an establishment of religion in the school.

Gov. Rick Perry offered a statement on the ruling: Today’s ruling is a win for free speech and religious freedom. The Kountze High School cheerleaders showed great resolve and maturity beyond their years in standing up for their beliefs and constitutional rights. I’m proud of them and I celebrate this victory alongside them.

 
For more information watch the video below:

Religious gesture leads to team’s disqualification

After completing a winning relay and looking forward to competing in state championships, a Texas high school track team has been disqualified for a benign gesture by one of the participants.
When runner Derrick Hayes pointed toward the sky after completing the team’s fastest race of the year, the school district decided to ban the team from further competition for a purported rule violation.

Robert O’Connor, the district’s superintendent, explained rules dictate no participant can engage in celebratory acts, including raised hands.

Hayes’ father said his son was just acknowledging God’s role in the successful run.

He is among a number of other individuals who are actively disputing the ruling, though there is no indication state officials will overturn the decision.

“You cross a finish line and you’ve accomplished a goal and within seconds it’s gone,” said the elder Hayes, wondering “what does that tell them about the rest of their lives? You’re going to do what’s right, work extra hard, and have it ripped away from you?”

Though O’Connor doesn’t see Hayes’ display as “technically a terrible scenario,” he said “the action did violate the context of the rule.”

Many oppose the disqualification on religious freedom grounds, though I contend this incident also highlights another unfortunate trend in today’s society.

Removing any sign of celebration from a victory sends precisely the wrong message to the next generation – though from a leftist standpoint, it makes perfect sense.

While good sportsmanship should always be expected, there should be a reward for hard work and these students deserve a bit of self-congratulation. Instead, the progressive agenda calls for all participants to be treated equally, despite effort or achievement.

As we’ve seen in countless other aspects of life, this practice only serves to disincentivize success, lowering the overall quality of life across the board.

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More states making move to gold, silver as legal tender

gold as legal tenderArizona senators voted 18-10 on Tuesday to pass a measure that would make gold and silver legal for use as tender for payment.

Earlier this month the same legislation cleared the Arizona House which leaves only Governor Jan Brewer’s signature before it becomes law.

While U.S. currency will continue to be accepted in the Grand Canyon State, the new bill allows gold and silver coins and bullion to be used beginning mid-2014.

Utah passed a similar law in 2011. Kansas, South Carolina and several other states are advancing similar bills.

While Utah and Arizona’s legislation is little more than symbolic, other states are eyeing infrastructure projects key to allowing precious metals to be used as legal tender.

Texas legislators are considering a measure to create the Texas Bullion Depository that would store about $1 Billion in gold currently held in a New York facility. The new facility would also function as a place for public deposits which would create a realistic medium for trade similar to blacksmiths’ and bankers’ handling of the precious metal in earlier times. Money could be deposited for one or more “depository notes” which could be traded for goods and services. The person receiving the notes in trade could then turn it in to the depository for gold. The notes would likely be backed by the State government and its gold holdings.

While the U.S. Constitution prevents states from coining money, it also says that states may not “make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts” a phrase likely opening the door for states to pass these precious metal currency bills.

The States’ moves are seen as a response to the Federal Reserve’s constant dumping of liquidity into the American economy thereby devaluing the dollar and, as many believe, leading to the collapse of the U.S. paper money.

While some states may be taking action as a symbolic nose-thumbing at the Fed, others are clearly planning for the potential downfall of the dollar.

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