Tag Archives: San Diego

Caring or Abuse? A Case Goes to Court.

abuse

Regular readers may know that I am a mom to a special needs, non verbal young adult son. He is among the most vulnerable among us. He cannot tell me if things are okay. As mom I must glean from his actions and signs wabusehether he is happy, scared, hungry or tired.

One of my greatest fears is that someone would hurt or abuse him. Because of this, I am and will always be a ‘helicopter mom’, one who hovers nearby, always watching for an indication that there might be a problem.

I could be the mom in this video. This woman was concerned that her autistic son was not receiving good care. As an adult, the son lived in a nursing home with non-family caregivers. The mom’s intuition was so strong that she placed recording cameras in her son’s room and then watched the videos. The images she saw demonstrated enough abuse to her son by caregivers that they are now on trial for abuse.

 

San Diego, California News Station – KFMB Channel 8 – cbs8.com

According to the Examiner, the National Autism Association estimates that more than 200 students have died within the last five years due to restraints used in schools. A study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania shows that over 18 percent of children with autism have been physically abused.

With such staggering statistics, it may seem difficult for parents of autistic children to know how to protect against abuse and restraint. Cameras, such as those used by the parents of the 23-year-old in San Diego, are a good starting point.

No doubt, even the most experienced caregiver can become frustrated but it is never permissible to cause harm.

As Pope John Pall II said, “A society will be judged on the basis of how it treats its weakest members…”

Wisconsin and California: Big labor on the decline

Most of America is aware of what happened in Wisconsin. Governor Walker’s recall win was about balancing budgets and keeping care of the public treasury. Wisconsin is not the only place that happened last night.

California voters also screamed out to unions “this far and no further”. In San Diego, voters approved by wide margin (69-31%) cuts to city pensions and San Jose voters accepted (71-30%) a measure that would force city workers to either pay more into their pensions or accept more moderate benefits.

In both cases, perhaps the voters are fed up with overly-rich benefits eating up taxpayer money. Retiring at 50 or 55 then double-dipping at the cost of the taxpayer is no longer acceptable.

What could be more disconcerting for the Obama camp is whether the unions have overspent in these losses giving them less money to spend on the presidential re-election. Big labor may also be less willing to organize considering the lack of enthusiasm the White House exuded in dealing with the Wisconsin race. Obama’s only act was to tweet Mayor Barrett the night before the election.

So while the talking heads are telling America that the major reason the recall failed was the Wisconsin was tired of the politics and just wanted it to be over .. think about that. Wouldn’t the recall be just as over if the union-enslaved Democrats had won? Where was the recall exhaustion when San Jose and San Diego voted for reforms similar to Governor Walkers?

This election was about fiscal sanity and realistic choices.  It would seem that more Americans have decided that Utopia, unicorns and progressive success are very similar. They just don’t exist – except in fairy tales.

Californians Face Primary Voting Today: Races to Watch

california-flag-bear

Tuesday, June 5

Californians head to the polls today to vote in primary elections and the ballots will be longer than voters have seen in the past. That is because new ballot rules goes into effect this election cycle. Under the new “top-two” system, party affiliations are removed from candidates and voters will have the opportunity to choose from any candidate from any party. The top two winners will then square off in the November elections. This applies to all races except the Presidential race.

There are only two propositions on the ballot this cycle:

Prop 28 has been billed as “term limits” legislation but technically lengthens the amount of time legislators can serve. Currently legislators are limited to two 3-year terms in the Assembly and two 4-year terms in the Senate. That’s a total of 14 years a politician can serve in the legislature. Prop 28 reduces that limit to 12 years but allows lawmakers to serve that 12 years in either house.

Prop 29 levies a new $1 per pack cigarette tax to raise money for “cancer” research. Opponents say it creates a new bureaucracy and doesn’t allocate taxes to be spent within the borders California. So far polling on the measures shows Californians in favor of passing both.

A couple of other races to watch in California today:

In Orange County the heated, controversial race for County Supervisor between “establishment” Republican Todd Spitzer and “Tea Party” candidate Deb Pauly will come to a head. Both Spitzer and Pauly have thrown out contentious, serious allegations of misconduct against each other. Pauly was ousted as vice-chair of the OC Republican Party just days ago and Spitzer has been running from a record in which he increased pensions.

The Senate race, where Republican Elizabeth Emken will join 23 other candidates to take on the heavily funded Diane Feinstein

The race for District Attorney in Los Angeles, where Republican Alan Jackson will try to force a run-off against Carmen Trutanich. Trutanich (D) has faced accusations of corruption and bullying, but has raised twice the funds of Jackson.

Two local elections are mirroring what is happening in Wisconsin today. In San Diego and San Jose voters will be asked to decide on pension reforms in order to reign in the city budgets. Predictably, unions have been fighting the measures in both cities. The results will have a ripple effect throughout the rest of the state, as California faces an $85 billion unfunded pension liability in the coming years.

California currently does not have any of those pesky, racist voter identification laws so vote early, vote often.

You can follow election results live at the Orange County Register . I’ll also be doing a live, remote show from a special location to be disclosed at showtime, so tune into the Dark Side with Kira Davis at 7:00 p.m. Pacific.