Tag Archives: Rick Perry

GOP Candidates Continue to Toss Money Down Cornhole

Gilligan-s-Island-Mr-and-Mrs-Howell-classic-television-revisited-3727152-435-326The really big difference between Republican and Democrat handout recipients is their ability to be sympathetically photogenic. When pressed, the average Democrat welfare recipient can hide the flat–screen TV, stash the cellphone in a drawer and refrain from cigarette smoking. And it’s not too much trouble to pretend to fill out the job application or limp convincingly to prove the bad back disability claim as long as photographers and media are around.

The Republican dependency class is another genus entirely. Empathy generating photo shoots and news coverage for these check–cashers is simply a non–starter. Hiding the Rolex, wheeling the executive jet inside the hangar, displacing the butler from the servant’s quarters and convincing the first wife to pretend to supervise the caterer is just too difficult to organize.

If Democrat welfare beneficiaries can avoid arrest, making jihad videos and Judge Judy the money continues to arrive completely free of social disapproval.

Not so for GOP crony capitalists. These leeches fight a two front war: Prevent competition and confuse conservatives. They are loud and proud “job creators,” economic mainstays and incubators of breakthrough technology! All the favored crony industry requires for total success is billions of taxpayer dollars in perpetuity while the people who supply the tax dollars maintain a discrete and respectful silence.

And Republican officeholders must pretend the conservative market principles they espouse in campaign commercials somehow don’t apply to this particular crony.

A disappointing number of 2016 GOP presidential candidates recently did just that in Iowa during the quadrennial Pour Money Down the Cornhole Festival otherwise known as the Iowa Ag Summit.

There Republican presidential candidates worship the ethanol subsidy and praise ethanol entrepreneurs for their selfless addiction to subsidies and environmental fairy tales.

The Renewable Fuel Standards law requires all gasoline refined in the US be 10 percent ethanol. Ethanol is the wonder product, made from corn, which makes gasoline more costly while reducing miles per gallon and increasing wear on internal combustion engines.

Diluting perfectly efficient gas with ethanol is like forcing mom to add sawdust to her cake recipe to protect our valuable flour stockpile. Sure the additional roughage keeps dad regular, but wear and tear on teeth and the occasional oven fire — not to mention that Home Depot flavor — doesn’t come close to compensating for the missing wheat.

The same is true for ethanol, all at a cost to taxpayers of $6 billion a year in handouts.

Somehow those facts didn’t make it into the spiel GOP mega contributor and summit sponsor Bruce Rastetter made.

Ethanol supporters would have one believe that before the bill was passed requiring refineries to dilute your gasoline, corn grew wild in Iowa and no one was even aware there was a use for the weed, other than the occasional frontier corn fritter. And even after wise agronomists in Washington started throwing money at corn farmers the fuel market was controlled by sinister forces that prevented innovation.

Just like the whale oil cartel prevented widespread drilling for oil until the early 60’s.

As columnist Paul Driessen wrote Rastetter’s pitch to the assembled candidates was pointed and effective: Failure to support ethanol handouts in Iowa means no victory in the 2016 caucus and no chance for the GOP nomination.

Naturally Big Government Republicans didn’t require much in the way of pressure to crumble. Jeb Bush said corny gasoline reduces the demand for imported oil. Mike Huckabee said it’s a way for the nation to “fuel itself.” (No pun intended.) And Lindsay Graham solemnly stated “Every gallon of ethanol … is one less gallon you have to buy from people who hate your guts,” which makes you wonder when Obama started pumping gas.

Rick Santorum, trying to get someone to pay attention, thought the RFS means something besides oil and natural gas “are allowed into [the energy] stream.” And Scott Walker was a profile in cowardice as he abandoned his 2006 call for an end to ethanol subsidies.

Rick Perry split the difference and wanted to end federal ethanol subsidies, but said that individual states could choose to be a foster parent for corn, which is at least a Constitutionally valid stance and would exempt most states that don’t grow corn and corn lobbyists.

The only candidates claiming to be conservative supporters of market competition and having the courage to tell Iowa voters the subsidy spigot should be turned off were Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio — although Rubio did refer to corn as “maize.”

There’s an old song about moonshiners called “White Lightening” with a refrain that goes “Mighty, mighty pleasin’ my pappy’s corn squeezin’s.” Until Republicans can stop “pleasin’” crony capitalists with subsidies at the expense of the public, taxpayers will continue to be subject to regular “squeezin.”

Perry, Paul & Huckabee at CPAC 2014

Gen. John Bell Hood, another Texan that could get a crowd moving.

Gen. John Bell Hood, another Texan that could get a crowd moving.

Gen. Robert E. Lee used Texas infantry as his reliable shock troops during the Civil War. If Hood’s division couldn’t drive the Yankees from a position, then no troops could.

Evidently CPAC schedulers are of the same opinion.

On both of the first two days of the conservative conference Texas speakers were used to soften up the crowd for all the speakers that followed.

On Thursday it was Sen. Ted Cruz (R–TX) and on Friday it was Gov. Rick Perry (R–TX).

Perry hit the stage cold to the tune of AC/DC’s ‘Back in Black’ and did so without anyone to introduce him. Perry is now sporting black nerd glasses that make him look more intellectual without softening him up so much that he looks like pajama boy in the Obamacare ad.

The governor began by stating that on the battlefield of ideas “a little rebellion now and then is a good thing.” Then there was a long pause, which started to produce debate flashbacks for me, but it proved to be just a slow Internet connection.

Besides being another step on the stairway to political redemption, the speech was a rousing defense of federalism. Perry says for the solution to the problems facing the country we should not look to Washington, but instead we should look to the states that “are laboratories of innovation.”

And the states provide a contrast between two visions. In the blue vision the state “plays an increasing roll in the lives of citizens.” Taxes are high, public employee pensions are out of control and jobs are leaving.

Perry contrasted that smothering philosophy with the red state vision where “freedom of the individual comes first and the reach of government is limited.” There taxes are low, spending is low and opportunity is high.

Then Perry did something surprising. On Friday when Chris Christie spoke the examples were mostly about him and about New Jersey. But that’s not what Perry did. He started off by giving other Republican governors credit for their good ideas and successful records.

He mentioned Nikki Haley in South Carolina, Bobby Jindal in Louisiana, Scott Walker in Wisconsin and Rick Scott in Florida. Then Perry proceeded to list accomplishments particular to each.

Perry was halfway through his speech before he even mentioned Texas. He spoke first of the common denominator among all red state leaders, “Conservative governors who know freedom of the individual must come before the power of the state…the contrast is crystal clear.” He then used an example from the world of transportation. “If you rent a U–Haul to move your company it costs twice as much to go from San Francisco to Austin as it does the other way around, because you can’t find enough trucks to flee the Golden State.”

Only then did Perry say, “Let’s pick a large red state, shoot let’s pick Texas” as he began listing his accomplishments. This is one of the reasons Perry is so likable: He doesn’t appear to take himself too seriously. He, in contrast to Obama, is not The Great I Am.

His speech was full of humor, substance and energy. Perry has been on the comeback trail now for two years and he’s making progress. His demeanor and energy level is in marked contrast to that of the disastrous 2012 presidential campaign.

I have no way of knowing if he’s a terror to his staff or if he kicks the family dog, but you certainly can’t tell it from his personal appearances. If it wasn’t for his squishiness on illegals, I’d almost be ready to vote for Perry today.

I can’t say that for former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

Politically Huckabee is simply George Bush who can tell a joke. There are many things I admire about Huckabee: His faith, his conservative social values and his sense of humor in particular. But as president he would be spending at least as much as Bush and I see no indication that he’s ever seriously considered putting Uncle Sam on a diet.

And speaking of diets, Huckabee’s is evidently not going too well. In stark contrast to his former fit self, now if the occasion arose Huckabee could fill in quite nicely as Chris Christie’s body double.

Huckabee’s speech began on a discordant note. He was given the same 10 minutes as Rick Perry, but he wasted some of the time complaining about only getting 10 minutes. In contrast to Perry’s upbeat and dynamic address, Huckabee came off as slightly petulant.

His speech was structured around a series of “I knows” that included, “I know the IRS is a criminal organization. I know that life begins at conception. I know there’s a God and this nation would not exist if He had not been the midwife of its birth.”

He even obliquely addressed homosexual marriage when he quoted Mrs. Billy Graham who said, “If God does not bring fiery judgment on America, God will have to apologize to Sodom and Gomorrah.”

Huckabee concluded with a final “I know” that brought back memories of his rocky beginning when he said, “I know my time is up and I must go.”

Diet jokes aside, he simply wasn’t a heavyweight on Day Two and if Huckabee is indeed running for president in 2016 this speech didn’t help his case.

Sen. Rand Paul (R–KY) was the other major league presidential candidate speech of the day. He had double the time allotted to Perry, yet I don’t think his speech had the same impact. They are two entirely different personalities. Paul comes off as somewhat remote and clinical when he speaks. He certainly says the right things and delivers a polished speech, but he doesn’t have the infectious enthusiasm of Rick Perry.

Personally I wonder how many of the reporters who pronounced Chris Christie as rehabilitated after the response to his speech the day before were around for Paul’s. The packed room was on its feet and cheering before the senator could say a word. Christie on the other hand had a much smaller crowd and response was polite until very late in his performance.

Paul’s speech was about liberty but it was also about sending a message to the Mitch McConnells, John McCains, Lindsey Grahams and other establishment RINOs. Paul asked the audience to “Imagine a time when our great country is governed by the Constitution. You may think I’m talking about electing Republicans, but I’m not. I’m talking about electing lovers of liberty.”

“It isn’t good enough to pick the lesser of two equals,” Paul explained. “We must elect men and women of principle and conviction and action who will lead us back to greatness. There is a great and tumultuous battle underway not for the Republican Party but for the entire country.

Then in a challenge to elected leaders and party supporters alike, Paul asked, “The question is will we be bold and proclaim our message with passion or will we be sunshine patriots retreating when we come under fire?”

Paul then focused on the NSA, data mining and the entire security mindset of the government, which he believes is dangerous. He referenced the Sons of Liberty from the Revolution who stood up to King George and predicted, “The Sons of Liberty would today call out to the president. ‘We will not submit. We will not trade our liberty for security. Not now. Not ever.’”

Getting down to cases with an audience that skewed toward youth and tech savvy, Paul explained, “If you have a cell phone, you are under surveillance. I believe what you do on your cell phone is none of their damn business.”

His other examples of government overreach in the name of security included detention without a trial, individual warrants applied to a class of people, credit card data collection, cell phone metadata and other violations of the 4th Amendment.

The senator stated flatly “Government unrestrained by law becomes nothing short of tyranny.” Then he used Daniel Webster to show the fight for liberty has been an ongoing struggle that must be continued today. “Daniel Webster anticipated our modern day saviors who wish to save us from too much freedom. He wrote: ‘Good intentions will always be pleaded for every assumption of authority. It’s hardly too strong to say the Con was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions.’”

Paul wasn’t giving so much a speech, as he was Peter the Hermit asking the young people to join in a crusade. He has passionate ideas and beliefs, but Paul’s delivery is simply not as winning as that of Perry. One can be serious without being sepulchral.

It will be very interesting to follow the arc of both campaigns as I see Perry being a bigger threat to Paul than the other Texan, Ted Cruz.

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge

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When:Saturday, October 19th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radiosncl_logocdn

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Tonight is special because Texas Senator Ken Paxton joins to discuss his run for Attorney General. Why is he running? What makes him different from his opponents, state Representative Dan Branch and Railroad Commissioner Barry Smitherman? Could he draw in libertarians? What does he think about Battleground Texas?

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge October 12th

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When:Saturday, October 12th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radiosncl_logocdn

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Tonight is Texas politics and cigar talk with Scott Braddock! He’s not just from Texas…he’s OF Texas. Also expect some TX/OU weekend talk to, but only if we’re either A) Shocked at how much OU beats TX by or B) Shocked TX actually makes it a decent game.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge July 27th

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When:Saturday, July 27th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radiosncl_logocdn

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Taylor talks to  Liz (yes the co-host) about her recent Politichicks article found here: http://politichicks.tv/column/sex-lies-politics-priorities-self-respect-walking-in-huma-abedins-shoes/ It’s awesome you should read it.

Also expect Texas politics talk, tattoo talk (again) with a heavy dose of freedom and liberty.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

 

Greg Abbott and the Art of the Twitter Townhall

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abbottTwitter is probably one of the best ways to make connections with people across the globe, but it’s hard to have a serious political conversation at 140 characters. Despite this limitation, politicians are using a Twitter Town Hall as a way to get their message across and interact with voters. It’s not a bad strategy, but depends on how it’s used and what questions get answered.

For most politicians it’s easier to answer questions from supporters. For one, it helps them expound on their agenda. It also allows them to see positive messages they can play off of. Best examples are probably President Obama’s #my2k town hall in 2012 and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine’s #AskTim town hall on July 16th and 17th. Simple questions, simple answers. Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s #Randchat town hall with Reason had more positive questions than negative. But some of Paul’s answers were against the standard Republican answer and helped establish his libertarianism even more. Plus Paul actually talked policy, which not everyone is willing to do.

One of the more entertaining town halls was one given by Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott. Abbott is running for governor and used the #AskAbbott event to differentiate himself from Governor Rick Perry, especially on how contracts get handed out. He did a good job, but the best part was probably his willingness to take questions from Democrats, when they crashed the party. It’s not something politicians normally do, probably because they know the opposition isn’t going to be happy, regardless of the answers.

But Abbott was willing to play along, especially when Battleground Texas, an organization run by former Obama campaign members, stepped in. They first asked Abbott if he could speak Spanish, which didn’t get an answer. They decided to ask another one which, this time, Abbott answered.


Quick translation: Battleground Texas asked if Abbott could talk to the Latin community. Abbott said, in Spanish, his wife is Latina and he will be able to communicate to all voters. It’s a great response and pretty much shut Battleground Texas up for the night. But it shows how politicians on Twitter can respond without it disintegrating into a shouting match. It also shows a willingness to engage with people who don’t agree. Some questions aren’t worth answering because they’re either too snarky, too stupid or require an answer that’s far too nuanced for 140 characters. The nuanced answers are best for a one-on-one conversation or a column or a radio interview. But that’s Twitter.

There’s a big difference between what Abbott did and what politicians normally do. He talked to opponents without beating them over the head. Not everyone was happy, but that’s politics. It certainly beats the same ol’ questions and the same ol’ answers. If anyone still cares about that.

Saturday Night Cigar Lounge July 6th

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sncl_logocdnWhen:Saturday, June 29th, 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific

Where: Saturday Night Cigar Lounge with Taylor on Blog Talk Radio

What: Saturday nights were meant for cigars and politics.

Hear Taylor and his co-host Liz Harrison talk about everything from the past week – from politics, to news, to books, and entertainment. Whatever comes to mind, and of course, sobriety is not likely.

Tonight: Taylor is back in Texas and loving it. Tonight he’s joined by Ashley Sewell (@TXTrendyChick) to talk the sport that is Texas politics, the abortion bills, Wendy Davis and David Murphy from the Texas Rangers.

Listen to internet radio with CDNews Radio on BlogTalkRadio

Abortion debate returns to Texas legislature

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

Governor Rick Perry has called another special session in Texas to consider the abortion issue again. Protesters on both sides of the debate swarmed around the state capital, in the hope of swaying the legislators inside.

As reported by the Washington Post:

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens


With 30 days and the majority of state lawmakers on their side, Republicans are almost assured success as they seek to pass restrictions that would ban abortions starting 20 weeks after fertilization and require clinics performing the procedure to meet costly new requirements that could put many of them out of business.

“The Texas Legislature is poised to finish its history-making work this year by passing legislation to protect the unborn and women’s health,” Gov. Rick Perry (R) said in a statement.

In the first special session, the measure didn’t make it to the Senate for final approval until the last day, giving state Sen. Wendy Davis (D-Fort Worth) the window — and the national stage — to filibuster the measure to defeat.

“I was lucky enough to be able to make the choices in my life that I knew would work for me,” Davis told supporters Monday, responding to Perry’s suggestion that, as a teenage mother herself, she should’ve “learned from her own example.”

The new versions of the bill — House Bill 2 by state Rep. Jodie Laubenberg (R-Parker) and Senate Bill 1 by state Sen. Glenn Hegar (R-Katy) — are headed for committee hearings.

The “costly new requirements”, if the new bills are similar to SB-5, include requirements that all clinics has physicians on staff that also have privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the facility, and increased accountability for the clinics and their employees to ensure the safety of patients. Additionally, all penalties are levied against physicians and clinics, not patients. SB-5 cited fetal pain as the purpose of the legislation. It was not mentioned that according to the pro-choice Guttmacher Institute, 1.5% of all abortions in 2006 were performed after the 20-week limit being considered in Texas, or that complications increase significantly the longer a woman waits to have an abortion.

The risk of death associated with abortion increases with the length of pregnancy, from one death for every one million abortions at or before eight weeks to one per 29,000 at 16–20 weeks—and one per 11,000 at 21 or more weeks.

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

Used with permission. Copyright Felicia Winfree Cravens

While protesters against this legislation may want to claim that they are for women’s health, objecting to increased oversight and accountability in clinics does not exactly square with that ideal. Also, given the low number of women that tend to have abortions at that stage of pregnancy, and the increased probability of complications, including death of the woman, the argument tends to fall flat. After the Kermit Gosnell case in Pennsylvania, it would have been hoped that all women, regardless of their opinion on abortion, would want to do anything to prevent similar situations from happening again, which is exactly what the current bill under consideration would do. Time will tell, but if there are no significant changes on the floor in the Texas legislature, this measure will undoubtedly pass, and will not be stolen again by an unruly mob.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, an Eagle Scout, ‘greatly disappointed’ with Boy Scouts’ gay ban lift

Eric Gay/The Associated Press

The Headquarters for Boy Scouts Of America is located in Irving, Texas.

Texas Governor Rick Perry earned the rank of Eagle Scout, as did his son Griffin. The Boy Scouts of America Organization honored Rick Perry with the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award.

With the announcement yesterday that the Boy Scouts of America Organization has voted to open their membership to openly gay boys for the first time in history, Gov. Perry issued a statement.

AUSTIN – Gov. Rick Perry today issued the following statement regarding the vote to admit openly gay Boy Scouts:

Eric Gay/The Associated Press

Eric Gay/The Associated Press

 The Boys Scouts of America has been built upon the values of faith and family for more than 100 years and today’s decision contradicts generations of tradition in the name of political correctness. While I will always cherish my time as a scout and the life lessons I learned, I am greatly disappointed with this decision.

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Secession: Texas Is A Very Unique Place

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With all the rumblings and questions over whether or not secession can be done, Texas Governor Rick Perry takes questions after the April 15, 2009 after the Austin Tea Party rally.

Is Washington paying attention?

At the time of the posting of this article, there are now 83,548 signatures on the White House petition: WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO: Peacefully grant the State of Texas to withdraw from the United States of America and create its own NEW government.

Who knows what may come out of all of this?

The Day After…

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Well, we lost.  Mitt Romney didn’t win comfortably.  BUT, Republicans maintained control of the House of Representatives.  In one of the most ignominious highlights of the night, the GOP lost two senate seats – increasing the Democratic majority by two.  The current makeup is 55 Democrats to 45 Republicans.  In a milestone for the ladies, 20% of the U.S. Senate will be represented by women.  However, the night ended a bit like 2004 in reverse.

While the notions of GOP turnout seemed assured, it was rarely monitored, and turnout for the youth (and voter turnout in general) was unexpectedly high.  To no one’s surprise, young voters broke for the president (60-36), but represented a larger share of the electorate than four years ago.  Romney’s lead amongst independents wasn’t enough to overcome the Latino vote, which he lost to Obama miserably 72%-23%.  Lastly, Romney wasn’t able to cut into the gender gap quite as effectively as he wanted to, with the president winning women, overall, by eleven points.  However, it’s with unmarried women that Romney had a fatal disadvantage with, as they broke for Obama 67% to 31%.

On states, betting on Pennsylvania proved to another catastrophic play.  We haven’t won the Keystone State in almost a quarter century, and it may be time to part company completely.  Concerning Wisconsin, the state may have swung right on recent elections, but perhaps the ‘fairness voters’ – voters who may not agree with Walker’s policies, but are appalled that unions would want to revoke an election result – turned out to vote for the president this time.  In Ohio and Virginia, Romney’s failure to execute the war on coal narrative sooner, and formulating a response to the Bain ads, contributed to his defeat.

Without a doubt, the Bain ads – the Obama campaign’s first official salvo in their ‘Kill Romney’ strategy –  released right after Mitt unofficially clinched the Republican nomination resonated with Buckeye residents, and shame on the Governor’s communications team, who were on the defensive for most of the election cycle.  In short, like with Goldwater in ’64, the Obama campaign was able to define Romney – before Romney could define himself.  It’s another costly misfire.

However, I truly feel that Mitt Romney ran a good campaign, and did the best he could’ve with what he had regarding resources.  It’s hard to be successful when you don’t have a Karl Rove, James Carville, or David Plouffe on your side.  It also hurt that he couldn’t run on health care, since Romneycare served as the blue print for one of the most egregious affronts to the constitution since the Alien and Sedition Acts of the Adams administration.

Yet, if you looked at the field from the beginning, It was either going to be Mitt Romney or Rick Perry fighting for the nomination.  Newt and Cain treated this serious event in American politics with the maturity of eight year olds at a lemonade stand – with the lemonade being books.  For many Americans, Michele Bachmann failed the threshold question of any presidential candidate, which is do I trust this person with nuclear weapons?  Disgraced former Pennsylvanian Senator Rick Santorum failed the conservative test, in my opinion, by voting for Medicare Part D, which added $ 7 trillion to the unfunded liability of the program. That’s 20% of the entire unfunded liability, which we now have to deal with before the fiscal cliff.  He voted for Sonia Sotomayor for circuit judge. Santo voted against National Right to Work, Food Stamp reform, a flat tax, and Medicaid reform.  He voted for internet taxes, the unionization of FedEx (twice), and No Child Left Behind.  He took that one for the team.

Rick Perry, my choice for president, flamed out in one of the most epic derailments we’ve probably seen in a long time.  Jon Huntsman was too moderate.  Ron Paul was well, Ron Paul. So, we were left with Mitt Romney.  Sometimes the pickings of the field aren’t too stellar, and we have to deal with that.

Again, I don’t blame Romney for the loss.  Yes, Obama’s record of economic pain, which he has inflicted without mercy on the American people, is long, but his political team, along with the media, were able to spin it just enough to trivialize the fallout.  As Ralph Reed, Founder and former Executive Director for the Faith and Freedom Coalition, said at CPAC 2012 last February – we’re about to face “the meanest, toughest, most vicious political team we’ve ever faced.”  He was right, and we paid dearly for it.

Given Obama’s record, and Republicans’ inability to defeat him, it begs the question if the GOP should have any business being in American politics.  Yes, they still do, but renovations need to be made.  We need to do better with women – cough nix the rape talk cough cough – hispanics, and younger voters.  The hispanic vote ruined the California GOP back in 1994 when Prop. 187 established a citizenship screening process and barred illegals from using state services was construed as ‘anti-immigrant.’  It was really protecting the territorial integrity of the United States, a core function of a nation in the international system, but that’s a different debate. Regardless, it was the straw that broke the camel’s back, and California Republicans have been in the bunker ever since.

We need to find ways to protect our sovereign soil, but in a way that doesn’t come off as nativist.  Hispanics are hard-workers, religious, and pro-traditional marriage.  Or, at least, that’s what was the conventional wisdom at the time.  Heather MacDonald posted on National Review yesterday that:

a March 2011 poll by Moore Information found that Republican economic policies were a stronger turn-off for Hispanic voters in California than Republican positions on illegal immigration. Twenty-nine percent of Hispanic voters were suspicious of the Republican party on class-warfare grounds — “it favors only the rich”; “Republicans are selfish and out for themselves”; “Republicans don’t represent the average person”– compared with 7 percent who objected to Republican immigration stances.

spoke last year with John Echeveste, founder of the oldest Latino marketing firm in southern California, about Hispanic politics. “What Republicans mean by ‘family values’ and what Hispanics mean are two completely different things,” he said. “We are a very compassionate people, we care about other people and understand that government has a role to play in helping people.”

So, despite Mitt’s shaky conservative credentials, without a doubt, he’s the most hard-lined presidential candidate on immigration we’ve had in the past ten years – and that didn’t hurt him with these voters.  Bain, on the other hand, probably didn’t help.

Nevertheless, I’m not saying we should be for amnesty.  We shouldn’t be.  Amnesty is unfair and unethical – as is the president’s Dream Act light, which requires illegals to bribe the government $465 from doing it’s job enforcing federal law.  However, what 2012 should show all conservatives is that our coalition, which to Paul Krugman’s chagrin truly represents the ‘Real America,’ is static.  It’s more rural, blue collar, and white.  That’s not enough to win elections.  We need to improve outreach with minorities and venture back into the cities, or places where the people are, to make these contests competitive again.  George W. Bush won 44% of the Latino vote in 2004, with increased majorities in the House and Senate.  It’s not impossible. But it’ll be very difficult trying to chip away at the government’s “role in helping people,” which in Democrat speak for getting these people so dependent on us as possible, so they’re a lock when Election Day arrives.

Concerning the ladies, we need to exert a little more discretion when we talk about rape.  While the Democratic National Convention could’ve been Abortion Fest 2012,the senate races in this cycle should have been more appropriately called Rape Fest.  It’s odd that we even have to mention this, and some blame the Tea Party for these mishaps. I don’t.  The Tea Party is the heart and soul of the Republican Party.  As George Will once noted, they’re the best thing to happen in American politics since the Goldwater insurgency.  Republicans would not be where they are now without the Tea Party, but that does not mean we should accept every one of their primary victors as serious candidates.

As Tucker Carlson and Neil Patel wrote in The Daily Caller yesterday:

The tea party believes the GOP establishment is ideologically corrupt. They’re right. But replacing the current leadership with obviously unqualified buffoons is no remedy. Republicans have lost at least five winnable Senate races in the last two cycles because they fielded candidates whose only real qualification was being anti-establishment. Many will argue the GOP can only win going forward with more liberal candidates. That’s not true. But the genuine conservatives they find will have to come with political skills, policy smarts and impressive resumes in order to get elected.

The sad truth is that even if the Republican Party did all this — sent its current leaders home and stopped nominating losers — it still wouldn’t be enough. The country is changing too fast. Most people have the sense that America is different demographically from what it was 20 years ago. But unless they’ve been reading the latest census data, they have no real idea. The changes are that profound. They’re also permanent and likely to accelerate. In order to remain competitive outside Utah, the GOP will have to win new voters, and soon.

That’s the Republican reformation plan, Stage B. They may get there. First they’ll have to tackle the basics, like finding fresh leadership and candidates who aren’t embarrassing.

That will take some serious vetting.  Furthermore, we’re Republicans.  We’re pro-life, and the American people know that about our movement.  In elections centered on the economy, you can easily pivot away from such issues.  Sadly, some of our fellow party members couldn’t help themselves, they shot their mouths off, and got trounced.  There is much intra-party work to do – and it starts now.

Meanwhile, a divided America exists and the government we elected is representative of that partisanship.  Michael Barone wrote also wrote in National Review that Americans on the right, and the others of the left, are no longer becoming culturally cohesive.

Ronald Reagan, speaking the language of the old, universal popular culture, could appeal to both Americas. His successors, not so much. Barack Obama, after an auspicious start, has failed to do so.

As a result, there are going to be many Americans profoundly unhappy with the result of this election, whichever way it goes. Those on the losing side will be especially angry with those whose candidate won.

Americans have faced this before. This has been a culturally diverse land from its colonial beginnings. The mid-20th-century cultural cohesiveness was the exception, not the rule.

We used to get along by leaving each other alone. The Founders established a limited government, neutral on religion, allowing states, localities, and voluntary associations to do much of society’s work. Even that didn’t always work: We had a Civil War.

An enlarged federal government didn’t divide mid-20th-century Americans, except on civil-rights issues. Otherwise, there was general agreement about the values government should foster.

Now the two Americas disagree, sharply. Government decisions enthuse one and enrage the other. The election may be over, but the two Americas are still not on speaking terms.

It’s sort of like this exchange between President Bartlet and Governor Ritchie.

Right now, Obama is in a good position to increases taxes, which will happen when Obamacare’s fully implemented in 2014, nominate SCOTUS appointments, which threaten to curtail our constitutional rights, and to continue this destructive surge in government spending that only shackles people to the will of the state through dependency.  It’s up to House Republicans to obstruct Democratic plans, and put forward a deluge of alternatives of their own. Granted, we won’t be able to filibuster Supreme Court appointments, but this president’s agenda, and that of the Democrats, is inherently dangerous to the socioeconomic fabric of the country and we must fight them all the way.  Concerning the fiscal cliff, maybe compromise can be reached.  Yet, we should also remember that compromise is how we got Medicare Part D, No Child Left Behind, and the first round of federal stimulus under the Bush administration.  Policies that attributed to the near collapse of the conservative movement in this country.

I’m pessimistic that a deal will be reached.  This president’s ego would bust the marble in the Capitol dome – and he exuded poor presidential leadership as described in Bob Woodward’s new book The Price of Politics.  Yet, Mr. Will again reminds us that throughout the course of American history there is not a single thing that the American people wanted intensely and protractedly that they did not eventually get from the federal government.

Rubio at CPAC: Obama’s Contraception Policy is a Constitutional Issue

The 39th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) conference kicked off today with a prayer long enough to be listed on the program. Which is an important consideration in a conference this large. Some 6,000 conservative activists are gathered today, Friday and Saturday in Washington, DC to hear conservative speakers and attend workshops designed to prepare them for the coming election.

The agenda is so packed one must ruthlessly prune the less interesting sessions to concentrate on the more valuable, since every session has competition from other speakers and trainers.

Do I listen to Speaker of the House John Boehner (R–OH) bring the house down with a barn–burner of a speech? Or do I suffer crippling depression during a session about the massive debt that is the current and future legacy of the Obama administration?

Decisions, decisions.

Today’s speakers include Boehner, Sen. Jim DeMint (R–SC), Sen. Marco Rubio (R–FL), Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R–KY) and Rep. Michele Bachmann (R–MN).

DeMint began with a spirited defense of playing to win. Compromise, according to the senator, is fine when both parties have shared goals; as in a marriage. But compromise does not work when the two parties have opposing goals.

Democrats want to spend regardless of how much it adds to the debt. Conservatives want to cut spending. Any compromise you make with spenders always involves more spending. It’s like an alcoholic compromising with his wife by agreeing to drink Ancient Age instead of Maker’s Mark. He’s still passed out on the sofa at the end of the evening.

DeMint contends that with the current makeup of Congress, Republican conservatives have no shared goals with Democrats.
His solution is more conservatives in Congress, but particularly in the Senate, which is currently a mortuary for conservative legislation.

So far no sighting of the herd of Occupy parasites that boasted about occupying CPAC, just a number of DC police cars. But the day is young. Next up is Sen. Rubio, candidate of the future.

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Sen. Marco Rubio was introduced as a future resident at 1600 Pennsylvania and they may have a point. He gave a good speech that was summed up in his statement, “The greatest thing we can do for the world is be America.”

Evidently, Rubio wants to start this by producing a conservative government where people are comfortable cleaning out their garages and making enough room to start a new business, rather than using it to store a stockpile of bottled water and freeze–dried food for the apocalypse.

Rubio’s conservatism includes tax reform, sensible regulations and an emphasis on the Constitution of the US rather than that of South Africa. He stressed that the current controversy over Obama’s unprecedented order that forces Catholic institutions to provide birth control and abortions is not a social issue.

And I agree. Making it a social issue makes it “divisive” and part of the “abortion controversy,” that makes it intractable and beyond solving. Rubio points out the obvious and demonstrates the unprecedented order is a Constitutional issue and imminently solvable, if you follow the plain language of the Constitution.

Rubio also pointed out that any candidate who is in favor of leaving Medicare alone, is a candidate who is in favor of bankrupting Medicare.

Rubio’s introduction stressed his personal life and how he lives family values, so it is probably for the best that Newt Gingrich speaks on Friday.

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Gov. Rick Perry (R–TX) was scheduled for Thursday afternoon, but I was planning to miss his speech. What could he possibly say that was relevant?

I made a mistake with the Gingrich endorsement. I knew he had two wives but couldn’t remember the third? Oops.
But when I wandered into the media center there had been a schedule change and Perry was onstage. In retrospect it was instructive.

Rick Perry is actually a more dynamic speaker than Marco Rubio. He seems bigger on stage when he’s by himself and not surrounded by the competition. Instead of looking like the guest of honor for a firing squad, Perry is obviously large and in charge.

In a set–piece speech he is very good. The governor is relaxed, connects with his audience and doesn’t step on his applause lines. His speech was also more Evangelical than Rubio’s.

I don’t recall Perry setting any records for intentional humor on the campaign trail — although his accidental humor will live forever on YouTube —here Perry was funny.

One of his best referred to the Clint Eastwood “halftime in America” commercial. Perry felt that if it’s half time in America, he’s afraid of what’s going to happen if we don’t change coaches.

Too bad the sound track was the whistle of his Presidential train leaving the station….

Republicans Ensuring Obama’s Re-election

As we go further into the primary season I find the Republican Party doing more each day to ensure that Barack Obama gets re-elected in November. The establishment Republican elitists drove Herman Cain out of the running with a smear campaign of innuendo and accusation without one shred of evidence that any of these women were telling any semblance of truth. Truth didn’t matter, evidence didn’t matter; even to Republicans. The point was to drive out any conservative opponent in the running.

Rick Perry, the John Edwards plastic hair of the race, left the Democrat Party when he saw the winds of change bringing a Republican ascendency during the Reagan/Bush ’41 years. Perry isn’t now and never has been a conservative. In-state tuition and a “path to citizenship (amnesty)” for illegal aliens are not conservative positions, despite what Perry might think.

Once Cain had been eliminated Romney and Gingrich turned on each other in a manner befitting true liberals, or “Republican moderates” as the establishment likes to say. Gingrich berates Romney for making money using capitalism as his method. How can he say he is a conservative when he spends day upon day berating someone using the very system conservatives espouse?

Romney’s chief operative in Florida is busy working with Democrats to re-district Allen West out of the House of Representatives; Romney has destroyed the health care system and the economy of Massachusetts with Romneycare, and believes in the individual mandate. Of course, he mitigates the Romneycare issue by saying it is okay for the state but not the federal government to force citizens into purchasing something they don’t want. Gingrich also believes, or says he does, that the individual mandate is acceptable, even preferable. How is either one of them going to run a general election on abolishing Obamacare with these records? Not much of a difference from Obama to me.

Neither Romney nor Gingrich will bring up the issues that matter to We the People. I wonder why not. Gingrich rails at Romney for being a part of Bain Capitol but mentions not one word about Barack Obama having a former Bain executive in his inner circle. Why is this off the radar screen for Gingrich when he makes such a big deal about Romney’s Bain connection? Any mention of the nearly $500,000 in back taxes owed by current White House staff members while Obama rails at the “rich” who “don’t pay their fair share of taxes”? Or how about Timothy Geithner, the king of tax cheats? Not a word from Romney or Gingrich on Geithner either.

Just last week a lawsuit was heard in Georgia, Gingrich’s home state, dealing with the eligibility of Barack Obama to serve as president due to his not being a “natural born citizen”, a strategy developed by Republican candidate John Albert Dummett Jr., of California. You haven’t heard of Dummett because the ruling elite, including their propaganda arm FOX News, won’t give him the time of day. Just another annoying conservative; keep moving folks, nothing to see here. A ruling is expected very soon and is expected to keep Obama off the Georgia ballot. I watched the hearing and it was an impressive array of evidence showing that Barack Obama Sr. was a British subject, making our current president ineligible to hold the seat. One of the most significant political stories since Richard Nixon resigned due to Watergate, yet not a word from the two Republican front runners about it. I wonder why.

I keep hearing that Republicans need someone who can oust Barack Obama in November. I don’t seem to ever hear them mention what We the people need, or want for that matter. I wrote a few months ago, when Romney and Perry were “our only hope”, that we need to be careful what we ask for. Replacing Barack Obama with a clone is not the answer to our nation’s problems but that is where we are headed with Romney and Gingrich.

It seems Republicans are running to lose once again. This happened in 2008 with John McCain at the helm. He had the best prospect for election in Sarah Palin as his Vice-Presidential candidate but his handlers told her to keep quiet about Obama’s connections to Bill Ayers and Jeremiah Wright. Perceived weakness and a RINO candidate brought defeat and injected Barack Obama into office. I see today’s Republican Party playing the same losing game. They won’t touch Obama’s radical beginnings, the question of his eligibility, or his links to Wall Street money men.

Are the Republicans cowards or are they competing in this race to dissolve the United States of America into a Third World banana republic? I believe it is a combination of both. The party machine, elitist establishment is so afraid of being called “racist” or “extremist” that they refuse to take a stand on anything conservative. Even a dead fish can float downstream and today’s Republican Party is content to be a dead fish. Dead fish is what Romney and Gingrich offer us. Those of us who are willing to fight for freedom are a danger to their little dinghy capsizing in a tidal wave of conservatism and the establishment will do anything to prevent We the People from capsizing their boat. New World Order globalists own the Republican Party and conservatives are a danger to that ownership.

Right now the Republican Party sits back and criticizes Democrats but will not really jeopardize their seats in the back of the bus to stand with those of us who want true liberty to be restored in America. When the winds of change began to blow the way of conservatism during the Reagan years many Democrats wanted to jump on the bandwagon to continue their places of power in congress. Alan Specter is a classic example of this, as is Rick Perry.
Both, along with several others, changed over to the Republican Party and were welcomed with open arms by Gingrich and the Republican leaders in the Senate. I also remember them giving committee chairmanships to Democrats in the name of “civility” and “inclusiveness”. What happened? The Republican Party became almost as Marxist oriented as the Democrat Party. This compromising has led us to where we are now, a Republican Party dominated by “moderates” lacking either the courage or the desire to stand on conservative principles.

If voters compromise and “settle” for Romney or Gingrich our nation will lose our freedom, a freedom given by thousands who have died and suffered wounds in battle after battle against tyranny. If voters are willing to be dead fish and float downstream they will find a swamp of tyranny, despotism, and slavery at the end of that stream. It has happened many times in the past to other nations. France, Russia, Germany, Cuba, Venezuela, and many others have settled for the lesser of two evils only to find that evil is evil and the lesser of those evils sold them into slavery and despotism in the end.

As Neville Chamberlain found out in dealing with Adolph Hitler, appeasement and the compromise of values is always a losing proposition. People say that a third party candidate, or an out-of-the-establishment candidate like Dummett, cannot win so they won’t vote for one. The reason a third party or dark horse candidate can’t win is that too many people would rather take a chance on soft tyranny than stand up for total liberty; they would rather float downstream. We cannot preserve our freedom by floating downstream. Our founding fathers didn’t float downstream, the “Greatest Generation” didn’t float downstream and accept dictatorship from Hirohito and Hitler, and I won’t float downstream and accept dictatorship from Obama, Romney, or Gingrich. I will not accept tyranny from Democrats or Republicans.

I submit this in the name of the Most Holy Trinity, in faith, with the responsibility given to me by Almighty God to honor His work and not let it die from neglect.

Bob Russell
Claremore, Oklahoma
February 2, 2012

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