Tag Archives: public sector unions

Stockton, California as an Example of a Flourishing City

shoqbusiness

Stockton, CA – This city may be the first in California to declare bankruptcy. The city, in spite of cutting police, fire, and anything else it could think of, is still running in the red, and cannot make its bills. Why? Pensions and benefits for retirees have literally taken over the budget to the point where the city has been cutting back on services to residents to meet those bills. And the first ones to scream if Stockton does declare bankruptcy will be the unions. The following clip explains at least in part which city bills will take priority in the case of bankruptcy.

While many businesses have gone down the drain because of pensions and retiree benefits draining their assets, it is not as common as it once was. That probably has something to do with the fact that there aren’t as many unions in the private sector anymore. What we are seeing in Stockton is the future for many cities across the country, primarily because of contracts negotiated by public sector unions. While this is a very basic statement about the impending problem, it isn’t extremely difficult to understand. It is yet another economic issue that is at least an indirect result of the Baby Boomer generation reaching retirement age. But, unlike Social Security, this problem is theoretically negotiable, especially when cities make the decision to declare bankruptcy.

At that point, all contracts with the unions are nullified, and cities are in a position to re-negotiate terms with public sector unions. But, would we have been in this situation in the first place if city leaders had started thinking like business owners years ago? Probably not. Conservatives have been saying for years that spending money without serious plans to repay debts in the future is a mistake. In Stockton, even the leaders have admitted that they spent too much when times were good, and failed to “save for a rainy day.” But, they’re politicians, not business people.

Matt Edelstein, otherwise known as Shoq on Twitter, decided to weigh in on this. Well, he decided it was a good idea to pose what he obviously thought was a difficult question for me. I didn’t respond via Twitter, so maybe he’s deluded into thinking that he stumped me.

If municipalities were run more like big businesses, it is less likely that they would end up like Stockton. As for businesses making the laws of the land, gieven our current economic woes, that is exactly what we need. It has been made abundantly obvious that every level of government in this country is either ill-equipped, or unwilling to do what needs to be done to kick start our economy. More often than not, the fact is that government doesn’t need to do a damn thing – it needs to stop what it’s doing, and get the hell out of the way.

Momentum Goes to Republicans

nunst081

For the first time in US history, a sitting governor survived a recall attempt. The Wisconsin recall magnified a microcosm of American society and highlighted the contentious mood of the national debate over jobs, budgets, and how to best trigger America’s economic recovery.

The results in Wisconsin are especially revealing when examining the mood of American voters. That mood will play a critical role in determining November’s presidential election results. Wisconsin is one of several crucial swing states that could decide which economic direction American voters choose for their country.

In a traditionally liberal State, Governor Scott Walker ran as and has been governing as a fiscal Conservative. He stood his ground, staking the Governor’s mansion on defense of Conservative economic principles

The nation was watching closely. Neighboring states were too. Voters in a state obama won by double digits in 2008 had chosen to follow a different path in 2010. That decision to change course was re-confirmed by the outcome of the 2012 re-call attempt.

The looming national fight is real and based on substance. The upcoming presidential election will not be just about personalities. For obama, who’s personal polling numbers remain high, this is not particularly good news.

Unions formed as a way for workers to unite and push back against abusive employment practices. If public employees see the government they’re working for as abusive, there is a real problem. Either that government should be removed from office or the unions should curtail their expectations. Perhaps both. In Wisconsin, voters sided with the government. A Conservative government

A growing number of voters nationwide now believe public sector unions have gone too far and are milking a corrupt system. This is to the detriment of the ordinary folks who fund union demands with their taxes. The depth of animosity toward public employees is palpable. They keep demanding more until the taxpayers can no longer support them.

obama is closely tied to unions. For years he has openly supported them and worked to expand their role and increase their power. For a growing number of voters, that fact will come into play this November.

By visibly staying away from Wisconsin and mailing his support for Milwaukee Mayor Barrett in at the eleventh hour, obama may have made a crucial mistake. Rank and file union members might now see him as someone who was unwilling to stand up for them in their hour of need. Will they decide to stand up for him when he needs their votes come November’s election?

Make no mistake about it; the result of the Wisconsin recall election is a boost in moral for Republicans nationwide. On the other hand, it is a blow to Democrats, their union supporters and the rest of the institutionalized “progressive” left. Conservatives and the left went three rounds in Wisconsin and the left lost all three.

Whether the “progressive” Democratic Party and their press secretaries in the “progressive” Party Pravda/”mainstream media” want to accept, acknowledge or even report it, the momentum goes to Republicans.

http://mjfellright.wordpress.com/2012/06/06/momentum-goes-to-republicans/

Wisconsin and California: Big labor on the decline

Most of America is aware of what happened in Wisconsin. Governor Walker’s recall win was about balancing budgets and keeping care of the public treasury. Wisconsin is not the only place that happened last night.

California voters also screamed out to unions “this far and no further”. In San Diego, voters approved by wide margin (69-31%) cuts to city pensions and San Jose voters accepted (71-30%) a measure that would force city workers to either pay more into their pensions or accept more moderate benefits.

In both cases, perhaps the voters are fed up with overly-rich benefits eating up taxpayer money. Retiring at 50 or 55 then double-dipping at the cost of the taxpayer is no longer acceptable.

What could be more disconcerting for the Obama camp is whether the unions have overspent in these losses giving them less money to spend on the presidential re-election. Big labor may also be less willing to organize considering the lack of enthusiasm the White House exuded in dealing with the Wisconsin race. Obama’s only act was to tweet Mayor Barrett the night before the election.

So while the talking heads are telling America that the major reason the recall failed was the Wisconsin was tired of the politics and just wanted it to be over .. think about that. Wouldn’t the recall be just as over if the union-enslaved Democrats had won? Where was the recall exhaustion when San Jose and San Diego voted for reforms similar to Governor Walkers?

This election was about fiscal sanity and realistic choices.  It would seem that more Americans have decided that Utopia, unicorns and progressive success are very similar. They just don’t exist – except in fairy tales.

Election Results from Tuesday November 8th

Check back regularly as the CDNews staff will be updating this page as results come in from Washington, Mississippi, Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio. (or just hit the reload/refresh button occasionally)

Kentucky

Steve Beshear (D) wins re-election bid as Governor – has more than 58% of the vote

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has been re-elected, becoming the second Democrat to win a U.S. gubernatorial race this year amid lingering economic uncertainty that’s already proving worrisome to President Barack Obama’s 2012 effort.

Beshear easily overcame challenges from Republican David Williams and independent Gatewood Galbraith, in a conservative state where voters routinely elect Republicans in national races. With 50 percent of precincts reporting, Beshear had 241,211 votes or 58 percent, to 131,319 votes for Williams or 31 percent. Galbraith had 44,893 votes or 11 percent. [from HuffingtonPost]

Ohio

Issue 2: FAILED: SB5 – the limitation of collective bargaining for public-sector unions – Initiative fails, SB5 defeated, unions can hold Ohio citizens hostage again thanks to Millions of Dollars of Big-labor special interest money.

Issue 3: PASSED: Vote to exempt Ohio from Obamacare insurance mandate – measure passes – Ohio citizens have voted to be exempt from Obama’s health care reform individual mandate. Supreme Court case incoming “10th amendment v. Obama”

Maine

Maine voters decided that it should be ok to vote the same day you register overturning the law that would have required voters to register a whole 2 days before the election.

Mississippi

Initiative 26: FAILED: Definition of a Person (personhood) – does life start at conception? Mississippi says no: 42% yes, 58% no with 921 of 1876 precincts reporting

Gubernatorial race: BRYANT WINS: Phil Bryant (R) vs. Johnny DuPree (D): 802 of 1876 precincts reporting 59% to 41% for Bryant

Washington

The Washington Liquor State Licensing Initiative (1183) was PASSED by a 60-40 margin.  The referendum called for the closing of state liquor stores as a part of budget cutting and the privatization of liquor sales.

Virginia

Preliminary indications are that the Virginia Senate will be split 20-20 giving the tie break to the GOP Lt. Governor and control of committees to the Republicans.  However Senate seat 17 has been decided by less than 100 votes.  A recount is expected.