Tag Archives: Pork

Large American Pork Producer Sold to Chinese

Virginia-based pork producer Smithfield Foods (SFD.N) entered an agreement with China’s Shuanghui International for a $4.7 billion, all-cash buyout.

Smithfield has been under pressure from it’s largest shareholder, Continental Grains, to break into multiple companies and increase its dividend. The meat producer opted to sell out to foreign interests.

The deal will likely lead to an increased flow of American-grown pork to the Asian nation. A change that could impact pork and pork product prices at home.

Smithfield, the largest producer of pork in the world, operates processing facilities in North Carolina and several countries throughout the world.

The deal will require Federal Trade Commission approval.

No Pork at TX College? The Nanny State Continues.

Pork_chops_167541218

Are you sending your son or daughter off to college? If you are, have you given your adult (or close to adult) child instructions on eating a healthy diet? Or, are you anticipating that the school will make these choices for your young adult?

At Paul Quinn College in Dallas (a small private college) the president of the school is making these decisions for you. President Michael Sorrell came to the conclusion that pork is not a nutritious food and therefore banned it from the school cafeterias. All pork. Not just bacon, not just pork rinds.

In an email to students Sorrell wrote: “We know there are many negative health consequences of consuming pork (eating pork can lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cancer, sodium retention and heart problems, not to mention weight gain and obesity)…  Therefore, as a part of our continued effort to improve the lives and health of our students, Paul Quinn College and its food service partner Perkins Management have collaborated to create a pork-free cafeteria.”

A couple of questions immediately come to mind: Can a school ban a food? And is President Sorrell a nutritionist?

The answer to the first question is yes. Colleges can determine what foods will be served in their dining areas. However, in efforts to appeal to the college students more schools are increasing their menu rather than limiting.

To the second question and the implied, is President Sorrell qualified to make a determination that all pork is bad, the answer is no.

From the school website: Sorrell received his J.D. and M.A. in Public Policy from Duke University. He graduated from Oberlin College with a B.A. in Government.

The National Pork Board publishes a Frequently Asked Questions page on their website about the nutritional value and whether there were health risks from eating pork. President Sorrell might be surprised at their findings which appear in contrast to his statement.

From the “Pork: Be Inspired” website: Pork tenderloin is now as lean as skinless chicken breast. The study found a 3-ounce serving of pork tenderloin contains only 2.98 grams of fat, whereas a 3-ounce serving of skinless chicken breast contains 3.03 grams of fat.

The Canadian Pork Council states: The fat in pork is tran-fat free and mostly mono-and poly-unsaturated, so trimmed pork is suitable for even cholesterol-lowering or “heart-healthy” diets.

Many will also ask, what happened to eating in moderation? How can these young adults be expected to make their own healthy menu choices if never given options? 

Is this a continuation of the nanny state mentality? If so, where will it stop?

Remember John Murtha’s Airport? You’re Gonna Love THIS…

Ever wonder why we have to borrow so much money from the Chinese?

From ABC/Yahoo News:

The Murtha Airport in Johnstown, Pa., is a prime example of taxpayer spending that refuses to die. Representative John Murtha steered some 150 million of taxpayer dollars to this eponymous airport over the last decade and despite the fact he died more than a year ago, the money keeps on coming.

Three years ago, we first visited the tiny airport, and found a monument to pork barrel spending: An airport with a $7 million air traffic control tower, $14 million hanger, and $18 million runway big enough to land any airplane in North America. For most of the day, the only thing this airport doesn’t have is airplanes.

We flew there on one of three flights that arrive there daily, all of them from Washington D.C. About half the cost of every ticket, $100, is paid by American taxpayers, a subsidy Congress voted to renew just this past February.

The place had a shiny new luggage carousel, a state of the art tower, and some very bored air traffic controllers — but very few passengers. The place is a tribute to the power of its namesake; everything from the reinforced runway to the radar facility to the new terminal, are all thanks to Democratic Congressman John Murtha, who died more than a year.

But the taxpayer subsidies that made his airport possible continue to flow. Since our visit, the Murtha airport has received from the federal government $559,476 in stimulus funds to rehab a back-up runway, $82,551 for air guidance signs, $226,638 to improve the taxiway,  $19,412 wildlife hazard assessments, $95,950 and $62,325 to install weather reporting.

Which goes to show the power of a mighty Congressman can last long after he’s gone.