Tag Archives: poll

Americans Think Hurricane Katrina Worse Crisis Than Syria

Americans think Hurricane Katrina, Indian Ocean Tsunami and Haiti earthquake affected more people than the conflict in Syria
More than one-fifth of Americans are not at all familiar with the Syria conflict
Of those familiar with the conflict, three-fourths think U.S. should help people affected in some way 

SEATTLE, March 12, 2014 /Christian Newswire/ — Almost three years into the conflict in Syria, many Americans do not know the full scale of the crisis, according to a new poll conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of World Vision among more than 2,000 U.S. adults. The poll found that when presented with a list of prominent humanitarian crises, more Americans select Hurricane Katrina (16%) as having affected the greatest number of people than select the conflict in Syria (10%). So far the conflict in Syria has impacted an estimated 9.3 million people — more than Hurricane Katrina, the earthquake in Haiti and the Indian Ocean Tsunami and nearly as many as the three crises combined.

The study also found one in five Americans (21%) admit to being not at all familiar with the conflict. Those who are familiar are overwhelmingly likely to say the United States should do something to help, either through increased humanitarian aid, increased diplomatic pressure or other measures (76%, vs. 24% who say the U.S. should not help in any way).

As the three-year anniversary of the conflict in Syria approaches this weekend, more than 100,000 people have died and an estimated 9 million people have been forced from their homes — either within Syria or in neighboring countries such as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

A total of 9.3 million Syrians are currently in need of humanitarian aid, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. More than half of those impacted are children.

“Each day, millions of children are caught in the middle of the Syrian crisis, struggling for the basics of survival like food, somewhere to live and a safe place to call home. They face the threat of bombs, gunfire, early marriage, and being forced to work to provide for their families,” said Conny Lenneberg, World Vision’s Regional Leader for Middle East and Eastern Europe. “Yet many of us turn away, sometimes purposely turning a blind eye to all that is happening. Although it’s painful to see the reality, it’s vital that we do so. An entire generation is depending on us.”

Other findings from the poll include:

  • Of those familiar with the conflict, nearly half (47%) think the U.S. should increase humanitarian aid.
  • Of those familiar with the conflict, there are no significant differences between those with different education levels or household incomes who agree the U.S. should help those affected by the conflict.
  • Adults age 18-34 are significantly less likely to be familiar with the conflict than those age 35 or older (29% saying they are ‘not at all familiar’ vs. 18% of those age 35+ who said the same).
  • When it comes to why money may be hard to raise for humanitarian aid in response to the conflict in Syria, more than half of Americans (53%) think it’s because money should go towards addressing problems in the U.S.

The poll comes as World Vision is releasing a new report completely written and researched by refugee children of the Syrian crisis, titled “Our Uncertain Future.” In the report, children found that 86 percent of their peers have been exposed to violence. Several questioned why the world is not paying attention:

“If I had the opportunity to address people in power around the world, I would say: ‘Haven’t you had enough of the destruction in Syria? Haven’t you seen enough blood in Syria? Haven’t you seen enough deaths in Syria? What else do you still need, to save us and bring us back to our country? If I had a magic wand, I would erase all the destruction that happened in Syria or in any other country and draw instead the best and most beautiful thing for everyone,” said Hanadi, 17, a Syrian refugee.

World Vision has been responding to the crisis by helping people in Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, supporting more than 300,000 with water, sanitation services, household supplies and healthcare, with a focus on the protection and well-being of children.

Less than 1 in 5 Americans Say Their Congressperson Deserves to be Re-Elected

NY06256LOGONEW YORK, Nov. 25, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Another month and another round of headaches for the White House. They finally get through the government shutdown and now have to answer many questions about why the Affordable Care Act’s website was not ready for millions to sign up for health insurance. And, perhaps because of this, President Obama’s job ratings continue their downward movement. This month just one-third of Americans (32%) give the President positive ratings for the job he is doing, while 68% give him negative ratings. This is down from last month, when 35% gave the President positive marks and 65% gave him negative ones.

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,250 adults surveyed online between November 13 and 18, 2013 byHarris Interactive. (Full results, including data tables, can be found here)

While it’s not surprising that just 4% of Republicans but 59% of Democrats give the President positive ratings on the overall job he is doing, what should have White House worried about legacies and Democrats worried about fallout for Congressional elections is that just 26% of Independents give President Obama positive ratings while three-quarters (74%) give him negative marks.

There are two things that could make the President a little happier. First, there is an uptick in perceived direction of the country as three in ten Americans (30%) believe it is going in the right direction, up from 20% last month; seven in ten (70%) believe things in the country have seriously gotten off on the wrong track.  The second is that when it comes to who deserves the most blame for shutting down the federal government, almost half (45%) of Americans blame Republicans in Congress compared to “just” one-third (32%) blaming President Obama; 7% blame Democrats in Congress, while 16% are not at all sure.

It’s one year until the Congressional elections

Congress still sees their approval in the single digits, with just 7% of Americans rating the job they are doing positively while 93% give them negative ratings. This is slightly better than last month when just 4% of Americans gave Congress positive ratings. But it’s not just the institution of Congress that is suffering. Just one in five Americans (19%) give their Member of the House of Representative positive ratings, while 71% give him or her negative ratings. And this is across political parties, as 70% of Republicans, 68% of Democrats and 75% of Independents give their Member negative marks for the overall job he or she is doing.

Even more ominous for sitting Members is that half of Americans (52%) say, when it comes to their Member of the House of Representatives, it’s time to give someone else a chance, compared to just 17% of Americans who believe their Congressperson deserves to be re-elected. What should give sitting Members some hope is that 31% are still not at all sure. Looking at this by party, 52% of Republicans, 47% of Democrats and 60% of Independents say it’s time to give someone else a chance.

To see other recent Harris Polls, please visit the Harris Poll News Room.

Want Harris Polls delivered direct to your inbox? Click here!

Methodology
This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between November 13 and 18, 2013 among 2,250 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words “margin of error” as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

Gargoyle Joe Is Your Debate Firewall?

Biden’s new debate coach is not an improvement over John Kerry.

What does it say about a campaign when its hope for putting a stop to a precipitous decline in the polls is Joe Biden? Last night fireman Joe was at his pompous, bloviating best in the Vice President Debate with Cong. Paul Ryan. The most memorable line in his paper thin, fact–free rebuttals came when Biden looked directly at the camera and asked viewers, “Who are you going to believe? Me, or your lying eyes?”

Earlier in the week Obama staffers were trying to pin the blame for the current President’s poor showing on John Kerry’s debate preparation, but I don’t think replacing Kerry with the Cheshire Cat was much of an improvement. In the split–screen shots Biden looked like a dirty old man staring at an elementary school swing set as he leered and grinned during Ryan’s answers.

When he wasn’t interrupting and talking over Ryan, Biden was muttering and chuckling to himself like Gollum in the underground lake. I suggest that whoever posts these clips on YouTube use Aqualung as the background music.

The only time I had any sympathy for “Good Old Joe” was when the camera showed a view of the back of his head and you could see where even his hair implants were thinning.

Believe it or not Biden took a full six days off the campaign trail just to prepare for the debate. To put this in perspective, Jesus didn’t require six days to prepare for the crucifixion.

Presumably the first three days of preparation were devoted to words Joe wasn’t supposed to say including but not limited to: gay, marriage, chains, crushed, taxes, jobs, 7/11, Slurpee, f–ing, deal, articulate, bright and clean. And the last three days to words he should say. In fact, according to a report in the Daily Mail, Joe was programmed with hand–me–down one–liners that Obama refused to use on Romney.

Fortunately, since the debate was held before a mixed audience, Biden did not have to adopt with the black dialect Obama affects when he’s speaking exclusively to minorities. Biden got to keep all his ‘g’s and was not be required to use “folks.”

The process wasn’t brainwashing per se, but it required at least a light rinse.

And somewhere during all this preparation Joe found time to rent a floor polisher so he could buff his teeth.

This focus on Biden brings back memories doesn’t it? Joe was added to the team for his “extensive foreign policy experience” and his “long term Washington expertise.” Yes, 69–year–old Joe was cashing a government paycheck and sticking his foot in his mouth at time when the 42–year­–old Ryan had to be content with his thumb.

This is why conservative columnists hav alwayse been grateful Biden is the white guy.

Last night while showing off his expertise, Biden claimed the US is Israel’s best friend and that Obama and Netanyahu have personally met 12 times. Both are lies: Obama pledged to create some distance from Israel and the two have met nine times.

“Foreign Policy” Joe stated emphatically that the consulate in Libya had not asked for additional security, intelligence experts did not warn of an attack and that he knows from security briefings that Iran is a long way from getting an atomic bomb.

Unfortunately Ryan failed to point out that Thursday’s Washington Post had printed the emails asking for additional security at the consulate and he failed to ask Biden if the “intelligence experts” who assured him Iran is a long way from the bomb are the same ones who promised him the Libyan consulate was in no danger.

After Romney won the first debate so decisively, one would have thought MSM coverage of the VP event would be reality–based. But that’s not so, the media remains an Obama co–conspirator. CNN reported its own poll of debate watchers “a draw.”

Yet the graph clearly shows Ryan won 48 percent to 44 percent. What’s more, 28 percent of viewers said the debate made them more likely to vote for Romney compared to the 21 percent who said they were more likely to vote for Obama. And Ryan was judged more likeable than both “Public Trough” Joe & Big Bird by 53 percent to 43 percent, both of the latter being outside the margin of error.

And a pathetic AP reporter by the name of Jocelyn Noveck claimed, “the vice president also came up with the two catchiest phrases of the night – “bunch of malarkey” and “bunch of stuff.” Both of which are trite and ancient.

Fortunately, participants in a Luntz debate focus group that — was not on the MSM or Obama campaign payroll — felt Biden was “arrogant.” Personally, I thought that if Joe had a few feathers he could play Foghorn Leghorn.

The best part about the debate was viewers now realize to their horror that a lying boastful buffoon is a heartbeat away from a President that is helpless without a teleprompter.

Or as Barbara Schribner wrote: Now we can put a set of teeth on the empty chair.

 

 

Businesses: Government a Barrier, Not a Help, to Economic Growth

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) today announced the results of a nationwide survey of small businesses and manufacturers. The results cast a harsh light on the state of the U.S. economy six weeks before Election Day.

The poll, conducted by Public Opinion Strategies (POS), surveyed 800 small business owners, manufacturers and decision-makers at small and medium-sized companies, with a majority (55 percent) saying the national economy is in a worse position compared to three years ago. Among the chief factors survey respondents cited were federal regulations, taxes, government spending and the cost of health insurance and energy.

Key survey findings include the following:

  • 67 percent say there is too much uncertainty in the market today to expand, grow or hire new workers.
  • 69 percent of small business owners and manufacturers say President Obama’s Executive Branch and regulatory policies have hurt American small businesses and manufacturers.
  • 55 percent say they would not start a business today given what they know now and in the current environment.
  • 54 percent say other countries like China and India are more supportive of their small businesses and manufacturers than the United States.

“Manufacturers have told policymakers in Washington time and again that uncertainty and a negative business environment is turning the American Dream into a nightmare,” said NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons. “The findings of this survey show that manufacturers and other small businesses have a starkly negative outlook for their future—with good reason. There is far too much uncertainty, too many burdensome regulations and too few policymakers willing to put aside their egos and fulfill their responsibilities to the American people. To fix this problem, we need immediate action on pro-growth tax and regulatory policies that put manufacturers in the United States in a position to compete and succeed in an ever-more competitive global economy.”

NFIB President and CEO Dan Danner said, “The small businesses who are the engine of our economy are clamoring for their elected representatives to stand up and lead so they can focus on the business of getting America back on its feet. Yet, instead of smoothing the way, our government continues to erect more barriers to growth through burdensome regulations that increase costs for small businesses and all Americans. It’s time Washington started listening to America’s job creators and offered real solutions to help us back to prosperity.”

Bill McInturff of POS said, “The data in this survey offer a striking picture of how American businesses view the current state of the U.S. economy. It’s clear that small business owners and manufacturers are becoming increasingly more frustrated by the federal government’s inability to solve America’s economic problems. Manufacturers place most of the blame squarely on policies coming out of Washington.”

NBC/WSJ Poll Proves They Don’t Talk to Many Black People

new poll from NBC and the Wall Street Journal shows Romney as 0% support from Black voters. 0%!!! You don’t have to be a polling expert to know that 0% in any poll is next to impossible.  Kyle Becker from the Independent Journal Review (and our own CDNews) states:

Statistically, the polling of “zero” for Mitt Romney doesn’t even make any sense. Even if only one black person, say, Thomas Sowell, planned on voting for Mitt Romney, the statistic should be represented as <1%.

Apparently the poll “was conducted of 1,000 registered voters (300 reached by cell phone) from Aug. 16-20, and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.1 percentage points.” Did the “professionals” at NBC/WSJ even leave their own office buildings to conduct this poll? Who on earth were they polling? The White House Press Corps? The results of this poll say a lot more about NBC and WSJ then they do about Black voters. It’s one thing to take the poll, it’s quite another to publish it. NBC should have scrapped that garbage the second they got the results. As much time as the talking heads at MSNBC spend degrading Black conservatives, they OUGHT TO KNOW BETTER! Even just one view of my viral video response to their own Touré would be enough to prove that poll is complete bunk.

Sonnie JohnsonAlfonzo RachelStar ParkerThomas SowellWalter Williams…these are just a few Black Americans who support Romney. They are the more well-known names but there are thousands of us, too many to mention here. Most aren’t even political pundits. Many are folks who voted for Obama in ’08 and have been disappointed with his leadership or turned off by his public statements on issues that are important to the Black community, like illegal immigration and gay marriage; and one need not even look very hard to find these people!

Is there any more question as to the reliability/integrity of the mainstream media?

New Poll Sends Clear Message That Holder Should Go

Wikipedia Image

BELLEVUE, Wash., June 15, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — A new Rasmussen poll showing only 27 percent support for Attorney General Eric Holder keeping his job, while 73 percent are either in favor of his resignation or undecided, is a clear message that Holder should step down, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms said today.

There is one important caveat, noted CCRKBA Chairman Alan Gottlieb. Before Holder leaves, he needs to surrender all documents relating to the Fast and Furious scandal to Congressman Darrell Issa and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

“If Eric Holder steps down, that doesn’t mean he gets to walk away from this fiasco,” Gottlieb observed. “He doesn’t get to go home and write his memoirs, and he doesn’t get to just put all of this in his rear view mirror. He needs to comply fully with the subpoena, even if it means trouble for his subordinates, or his boss’ re-election campaign.

“The American public deserves answers,” he added, “and particularly, the family of slain Border Patrol agent Brian Terry deserves those answers. We cannot get those answers until the documents are turned over.”

The survey was conducted on Wednesday and Thursday of this week, and released Friday morning. It has a +/- 3 percentage point sampling error. It comes as Holder is trying to head off a looming Oversight Committee vote on whether to hold him in contempt of Congress for withholding thousands of subpoenaed documents relating to the Fast and Furious investigation. The Rasmussen survey revealed that 40 percent of those contacted are in favor of Holder stepping down. Another 33 percent are undecided, but that leaves barely a quarter of the public in favor of Holder’s continued service as attorney general.

“Holder needs to go,” Gottlieb said, “but not before Congress and the American people are allowed to learn the truth about this disturbing operation.”

With more than 650,000 members and supporters nationwide, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms (www.ccrkba.org) is one of the nation’s premier gun rights organizations. As a non-profit organization, the Citizens Committee is dedicated to preserving firearms freedoms through active lobbying of elected officials and facilitating grass-roots organization of gun rights activists in local communities throughout the United States.

Confidence in Congress Stays at Lowest Point in Almost Fifty Years

NEW YORK, May 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — The Harris Poll has been measuring the confidence of the American public in the leaders of major institutions since 1966. After seeing drops in confidence in almost all institutions last year, there is some stability this year as well as some small upward levels of confidence. However, some institutions are still at all time lows. Again this year, only 6% of all adults have a great deal of confidence in the leaders of Congress.  Only one in ten Americans (11%) again this year say they have a great deal of confidence in the press.

Based on all the responses to this poll we calculate the Harris Confidence Index. This year, the Index has gone up to 49 after falling to 48 last year, but still down from 53 in 2010 and 54 in 2009.

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,060 adults surveyed by telephone and online between April 9 and 17, 2012 by Harris Interactive.

Some of the main findings of this Harris Poll are:

  • At the top of the list, i.e. the largest numbers of people have a great deal of confidence in them, are the leaders of the military (55%) and small business (50%), far ahead of any of the other leaders on the list. These numbers have not changed significantly over the last three years;
  • Also high on the list, but substantially lower, are the leaders of medicine (34%), and colleges and universities (30%);
  • Not quite at the bottom of the list, but below the top institutions are the U.S. Supreme Court (27%, which is up from 24% last year), organized religion (23%), the White House (22% which is up from 19% last year), and public schools (21%); and,
  • At the bottom of the list, leaders in whom the public has the least confidence are Congress (6%), Wall Street (7%), the press (11%), law firms (11%), major companies (15%), organized labor (16%) television news (17%) and the courts and the justice system (19%).

So what?

While the confidence index rose one point and a couple of institutions saw small gains, very little has changed from last year. “The American public continues to be disgusted with the shenanigans of Congress and Wall Street,” says Robert Fronk, EVP Reputation Management at Harris Interactive. “Forgiveness and respect will not return easily for these two entities.” The stabilization in confidence is clearly a better outcome than the slide seen in the previous 3 years, but many of the institutions that form the backbone of our nation continue to be perceived as lacking in leadership, which does not bode well in the short term for our nation.

 

TABLE 1
CURRENT CONFIDENCE IN LEADERS OF INSTITUTIONS (2011)
“As far as people in charge of running (READ EACH ITEM) are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
A Great Deal

of
Confidence

Only some

Confidence

Hardly Any

Confidence

At All

Not

Sure/Decline
to Answer

% % % %
The military 55 33 8 4
Small business 50 38 7 5
Medicine 34 43 18 5
Major educational institutions, such as colleges and universities 30 47 19 4
The U.S. Supreme Court 27 50 18 5
Organized religion 23 38 30 8
The White House 22 40 34 4
Public schools 21 48 27 4
The courts and the justice system 19 54 23 4
Television news 17 48 31 4
Organized labor 16 42 35 7
Major companies 15 55 25 5
Law firms 12 51 30 8
The press 11 46 39 4
Wall Street 7 39 48 6
Congress 6 42 48 4

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

 

TABLE 2A
CONFIDENCE IN LEADERS OF INSTITUTIONS (2001-2012)
“As far as people in charge of running (READ EACH ITEM) are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”
Those saying “A great deal of confidence”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Change

2011-

2012

% % % % % % % % % % % % %
The military 44 71 62 62 47 47 46 51 58 59 57 55 -2
Small business X X X X 47 45 54 47 48 50 50 50 0
Medicine 32 29 31 32 29 31 37 28 34 34 33 34 +1
Major educational institutions such as colleges and universities 35 33 31 37 39 38 37 32 40 35 30 30 0
The U.S. Supreme Court 35 41 34 29 29 33 27 25 28 31 24 27 +3
Organized religion 25 23 19 27 27 30 27 25 30 26 24 23 -1
The White House 21 50 40 31 31 25 22 15 36 27 19 22 +3
Public schools X X X X 26 22 22 20 25 22 20 21 +1
The courts and the justice

system

X X X X 22 21 21 16 19 24 19 19 0
Television news 24 24 21 17 16 19 20 16 22 17 16 17 +1
Organized labor 15 11 14 15 17 12 15 11 16 14 15 16 +1
Major companies 20 16 13 12 17 13 16 14 11 15 13 15 +2
Law firms 10 13 12 10 11 10 13 10 11 13 11 12 +1
The press 13 16 15 15 12 14 12 10 12 13 11 11 0
Wall Street 23 19 12 17 15 15 17 11 4 8 7 7 0
Congress 18 22 20 13 16 10 10 8 9 8 6 6 0
The executive branch of the federal government 20 33 26 23 X X X X X X X X X
HARRIS INTERACTIVE CONFIDENCE INDEX* 55 65 57 55 53 52 53 44 54 53 48 49 +1

X = Not asked; * see methodology

Note: Prior to 2011 this survey was conducted by telephone only; the 2011 survey was conducted prior to Osama bin Laden’s death.


TABLE 2B
CONFIDENCE IN LEADERS OF INSTITUTIONS (1991-2000)
“As far as people in charge of running (READ EACH ITEM) are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”
Those saying “a great deal of confidence”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
% % % % % % % % % %
The military X 50 57 39 43 47 37 44 54 48
Small business 47 X X X X X X X X X
Medicine 23 22 22 23 26 29 29 38 39 44
Major educational institutions such as colleges and universities X 29 23 25 27 30 27 37 37 36
The U.S. Supreme Court 15 30 26 31 32 31 28 37 42 34
Organized religion 21 11 X X 24 X 20 25 27 26
The White House X 25 23 18 13 15 15 20 22 21
Public schools X X X X X X X X X X
The courts and the justice system X X X X X X X X X X
Television news 9 12 23 20 16 21 18 26 23 20
Organized labor 21 11 X X 8 X 9 13 15 15
Major companies 20 10 16 19 21 21 18 21 23 28
Law firms X 13 11 8 9 11 7 11 10 12
The press X X 15 13 11 14 11 14 15 13
Wall Street 14 13 13 15 13 17 17 18 30 30
Congress 9 16 12 8 10 10 11 12 12 15
The executive branch of the federal government X X 15 12 9 12 12 17 17 18
HARRIS INTERACTIVE CONFIDENCE INDEX* 45 45 47 43 43 47 42 54 60 59

X = Not asked; * see methodology

 

TABLE 2C
CONFIDENCE IN LEADERS OF INSTITUTIONS (1981-1990)
“As far as people in charge of running (READ EACH ITEM) are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”
Those saying “a great deal of confidence”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990
% % % % % % % % % %
Small business X X X X X X X X X X
The military 28 31 35 45 32 36 35 33 32 43
Medicine 37 32 35 43 39 33 36 40 30 35
Major educational institutions such as colleges & universities 34 30 36 40 35 34 36 34 32 35
The U.S. Supreme Court 29 25 33 35 28 32 30 32 28 32
Organized religion 22 20 22 24 21 22 16 17 16 20
The White House 28 20 23 42 30 19 23 17 20 14
Public Schools X X X X X X X X X X
The courts and justice system X X X X X X X X X X
Television news 24 24 24 28 23 27 29 28 25 27
Organized labor 12 8 10 12 13 11 11 13 10 18
Major companies 16 18 18 19 17 16 21 19 16 9
Law firms X X 12 17 12 14 15 13 X X
The press 16 14 19 18 16 19 19 18 18 12
Wall Street X X X X X X X X 8 21
Congress 16 13 20 28 16 21 20 15 16 14
The executive branch of the federal government 24 X X X 19 18 19 16 17 14
HARRIS INTERACTIVE CONFIDENCE INDEX* 51 46 53 63 51 51 53 50 46 50

X = Not asked; * see methodology


TABLE 2D
CONFIDENCE IN LEADERS OF INSTITUTIONS (1966-1980)
“As far as people in charge of running (READ EACH ITEM) are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”
Those saying “a great deal of confidence”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
1966 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980
% % % % % % % % % % %
The military 61 27 35 40 33 24 23 27 29 29 28
Small business X X X X X X X X X X X
Medicine 73 61 48 57 50 43 42 43 42 30 34
Major educational institutions such as colleges & universities 61 37 33 44 40 36 31 37 41 33 36
The U.S. Supreme Court 50 23 28 33 40 28 22 29 29 28 27
Organized religion 41 27 30 36 32 32 24 29 24 20 22
The White House X X X 18 28 X 11 31 14 15 18
Public schools X X X X X X X X X X X
The courts and justice system X X X X X X X X X X X
Television news X X X 41 31 35 28 28 35 37 29
Organized labor 22 14 15 20 18 14 10 14 15 10 14
Major companies 55 27 27 29 21 19 16 20 22 18 16
Law firms X X X 24 18 16 12 14 18 16 13
The press 29 18 18 30 25 26 20 18 23 28 19
Wall Street X X X X X X X X X X 12
Congress 42 19 21 X 18 13 9 17 10 18 18
The executive branch of the federal government 41 23 27 19 28 13 11 23 14 17 17
HARRIS INTERACTIVE CONFIDENCE INDEX* 100 58 59 69 64 55 44 55 55 50 49

X = Not asked; * see methodology

TABLE 3
CONFIDENCE IN INSTITUTIONS; AVERAGE FOR INDEX IN EACH DECADE

Click to view table full screen
1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s
1980 49 1990 50 2000 59 2010 53
1971 58 1981 51 1991 45 2001 55 2011 48
1972 59 1982 46 1992 45 2002 65 2012 49
1973 69 1983 53 1993 47 2003* 57
1974 64 1984 63 1994 43 2004 55
1975 55 1985 51 1995 43 2005 53
1966 100 1976 44 1986 51 1996 47 2006 52
1977 55 1987 53 1997 42 2007 53
1978 55 1988 50 1998 54 2008 44
1979 50 1989 46 1999 60 2009 54
AVERAGE FOR
DECADE
100 57 51 48 55 50

*Completed in December 2002


TABLE 4
CONFIDENCE LEVELS – BY PARTY
“As far as people in charge of running … are concerned, would you say you have a great deal of confidence, only some confidence, or hardly any confidence at all in them?”
Those saying “a great deal of confidence”

Base: All Adults

Click to view table full screen
Total Party ID
Republican Democrat Independent
% % % %
The military 55 65 52 55
Small business 50 58 43 55
Medicine 34 33 39 33
Major educational institutions, such as colleges and universities 30 25 37 26
The U.S. Supreme Court 27 29 25 28
Organized religion 23 33 22 18
The White House 22 6 39 16
Public schools 21 16 29 21
The courts and the justice system 19 20 23 17
Television news 17 10 25 14
Organized labor 16 7 26 14
Major companies 15 19 12 15
Law firms 12 10 17 9
The press 11 5 17 10
Wall Street 7 6 7 7
Congress 6 5 8 5

Methodology

The Harris Poll® was conducted by telephone and online, within the United States between April 9 and 17, 2012 among a nationwide cross section of 2,060 adults (aged 18 and over). The interviews conducted by telephone (1016) included a nationwide cross section of adults with landlines in their households.  The interviews conducted online (1044) included a nationwide sample who have agreed to take part in Harris Interactive surveys, and who indicated not having a landline (i.e., cell phone only), or using their cell phone for almost all of their calls (cell phone mostly), and thus were included to ensure representation of these groups that are lacking among a traditional RDD telephone sample.  Telephone data only were adjusted to ensure appropriate representation on number of telephone/voice lines and number of adults in the household, and online data only were are adjusted by propensity to be online to correct for attitudinal/behavioral differences between our panel and those who respond via phone.  Finally, for the combined telephone and online data, figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region, household income, and phone status (cell phone only, cell phone mostly, dual users, landline mostly, landline only) were adjusted as necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population.  Population proportions for demographic variables were acquired from the 2010 Current Population Survey, while phone status proportions were acquired from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words “margin of error” as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

The Harris Interactive Confidence in Leadership Index measures changes in the public’s confidence in various institutions. It is derived in the following manner:

  1. The index is based on the mean value of the items asked.
  2. All items have equal weight.
  3. The year 1966, the first year the items were asked, was set as a reference year for the index and assigned a score of 100.
  4. In order to yield a score of 100 in 1966, the mean value of the original 10 items was multiplied by a factor of 2.11. This same factor was then applied to the mean score in subsequent years, as long as the same items were asked.
  5. Whenever a new item is added, the multiplication factor is changed so that the new item has no effect on that year’s score. The new factor is derived by calculating the index with and without the new item(s), taking the ratio of the two scores, and multiplying this ratio by the old factor. (The current factor is 2.14).
  6. In years when an item included in a previous year is not asked, it is assumed for calculation purposes that no change has occurred in that item since the last time it was asked.

Romney Re-Takes Lead in Michigan

Mitt Romney how holds a 6 point lead in Michigan despite trailing Rick Santorum in that state for the last few weeks.

Up until Tuesday night’s debate, Rick Santorum had held the lead in Michigan polls. A lackluster debate performance that included booing from the audience seems to have changed the minds of Michigan voters according to a Rasmussen Reports telephone survey.

The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Likely Republican Primary Voters in Michigan shows Romney with 40% of the vote and former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum with 34%. The poll was conducted on Thursday night, following the last scheduled debate among the GOP candidates.

Digging into the survey results deeper shows an interesting conflict. When asked “If the 2012 Republican Primary for president were held today, would you vote for Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich or Ron Paul?”, 40% chose Romney while 34% chose Santorum – a reversal from a February 20th poll where Santorum held the edge on that question 38% to 34%. If the question is reduced to asking “Suppose the 2012 Republican Primary for president were held today and you only had a choice between Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum.  For whom would you vote?” Santorum takes the lead 46% to 44% so which of the other candidates is having an effect on Michigan election?

Ron Paul was selected 10% of the time and Newt Gingrich 9% of the time so both of the lower-tier candidates appear to be taking more of Santorum’s base than those that might vote for Romney.

” Electability” appears to also be driving poll results. When asked who survey respondents thought could beat Obama in the general election, 74% felt that Romney was very or somewhat likely to beat the president while only 59% said the same about Santorum. 44% of those responding to the survey thought that Newt could beat Obama while only 19% believed that Ron Paul stood a chance against the incumbent.

With the vote in Michigan being held next Tuesday, the trend and sentiment seem to be going Romney’s way.

Harris Poll: Republicans could lose the House

photo credit: R. Mitchell, CDN

The media has a “laser-like” focus on the GOP presidential nomination race, analysts are starting to talk about the Senate races, but the House has been all but ignored – and that could lead to another Nancy Pelosi speakership.

According to a new Harris Interactive Poll, a House election held today would have voters selecting a generic Republican 38% of the time and a generic Democrat just as often.

The data break-outs are where the interesting numbers lay. While almost 90% of GOP would vote for their party’s candidate, just 80% of Democrats would. That disparity alone should yield a right-leaning House.. shouldn’t it?

For the right, the key is independents. They would vote for a Democrat 28% of the time compared to 26% of the vote going to the GOP. 15% of independents would vote 3rd party and 30% of them haven’t even figured out how they would vote.

Congressional approval ratings are also at an historical low which could lead to an anti-incumbent campaign to turn the whole House over. Considering that Democrats have a 13% approval and Republican members only enjoy a 10% rating, a blood bath may ensue for the GOP.

The poor rating for Republicans may by in part by dissatisfaction from the TEA parties. The freshman conservative group that was elected in 2010 was sent to D.C. to cut spending, lower taxes and reduce the size of government. Little of that having been achieved and the back-room tactics being used by the GOP leadership to co-opt the movement may be more  reason for the backlash.

NBC Republican Debate January 23rd 9pm [full video and poll]

It wouldn’t be the 2012 Presidential campaign season without another GOP debate and NBC has come to the rescue.

Tonight at 9pm Eastern, NBC will hold the next in a series of Republican candidate debates which will include Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum.

Expect the debate to be the Mitt and Newt show – trading barbs on what has or hasn’t been released and who’s the better Conservative.

Taking into consideration Mitt Romney’s announcement to reporters shortly after conceding the landslide loss in South  Carolina, he is widely expected to lash out at Newt in the debate tonight. Mitt will likely demand Newt’s contract from Freddie Mac and other artifacts in an attempt to damage Gingrich’s rising favor with the electorate.

Rick Santorum was crowned the winner of the Iowa Caucuses, but hasn’t shown strongly in the two primaries that followed. His standings in the most recent national poll give little reason for any of the candidates or the moderators to aim questions and/or comments at him.

Ron Paul will likely stick to talking about financial bubbles and his non-interventionism foreign policy. Rep. Paul is the only remaining candidate not to have won in a primary or caucus. That, along with his disappointing results in South Carolina faltering national poll numbers may see another debate where Paul is less-involved than his fans would like.

Video:

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Who Won Poll:

[poll id=”39″]

Latest national poll shows dim prospects for Ron Paul

In a national survey of 1,000 likely GOP primary voters taken yesterday, Ron Paul and Jon Huntsman received the highest two “unfavorable” ratings among the remaining GOP hopefuls.

Rep. Paul had the highest unfavorable rating as 30% of respondents ranked him very unfavorable and another 29% said that he was somewhat unfavorable. A total unfavorable rating of 59%  was by far the worst of the group. Front-runners Romney and Santorum had unfavorables of only 26%.

Where things get really bleak for the Representative from Texas is when Rasmussen asked the respondents “Which Republican presidential candidate would be the weakest opponent against Barack Obama in the general election…. Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Ron Paul, Jon Huntsman, Newt Gingrich or Rick Perry?” – the results:

    •   5% Romney
    •   5% Santorum
    • 11% Perry
    • 12% Gingrich
    • 19% Huntsman
    •  36% Paul

Paul actually polled as a weaker candidate than Jon Huntsman when stood up against the current President and in an election where the mantra is “anybody but Obama” it will be difficult to get the nomination if no one believes you can beat the current resident of the White House.

First Poll after Iowa shows Santorum as serious candidate

Rasmussen Reports released the first national poll after the Iowa caucuses in which Rick Santorum managed to basically tie front-runner Mitt Romney while  on a seriously limited budget.

Mitt Romney held on to the top spot in the poll with 29% while Santorum jumped significantly to 21% of survey respondents. Newt Gingrich pulled in third with just 16% and Ron Paul rounded out the top four with only 12% . Perry and Huntsman both came in with just 4%.

Santorum could have gotten some of his lift from Michele Bachmann supporters needing a new candidate to back. Some support may also be coming from those starting to think that Perry won’t last much longer – but neither of those explain the incredible lift by themselves. Perhaps  Santorum has become the candidate for the “anyone but Romney” crowd. Among “very conservative” voters, Santorum out-polled Romney 33% to 18% and he topped Romney by 5% among those who self-identify as TEA Party members.

Romney’s strong support seems to be coming from somewhat-to-less conservative voters of all ages with incomes of over $100k.

As candidates start their attack runs on the leader, Romney, a national poll showing him failing to get much more than 1-in-4 voters into his camp is a cautionary note.

One important piece of information that came out of this poll is that almost one-third of respondents that chose Romney said they could still change their mind – the highest percentage of any candidate in the poll.

 

Over One-Quarter of Republicans Would Vote for Newt Gingrich, 17% for Mitt Romney in Primary, but One-Third are Still Not Sure

NEW YORK, Dec. 16, 2011  — Late last year, the race for who would challenge President Obama began and the story evolved a great deal. First, it was would Sarah Palin run or wouldn’t she. Then it was about the rise and fall of Michelle Bachman, then the fall of Newt Gingrich, then the rise and fall ofRick Perry and the rise and fall of Herman Cain. Now less than 20 days until the Iowa caucus, the story is about the rise of Newt Gingrich and how this has turned into a two man race between the former Speaker and Mitt Romney.

Among Republicans, over one-quarter (27%) would vote for Newt Gingrich in the primary while 17% would vote for Mitt Romney and 11% for Ron Paul. Other candidates are all under 10% including Michele Bachman (6%), Rick Perry (3%), Rick Santorum (3%) and Jon Huntsman (1%). One-third of Republicans (32%), however, are still not at all sure who they would vote for in the Republican primary.

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,237 adults surveyed online between December 5 and 12, 2011 by Harris Interactive .

Among Independents, 14% would each vote for Mitt Romney and Ron Paul, and 11% would vote for Newt Gingrich. Over two-in-five Independents (43%) are not at all sure who they would vote for in the primary. Among Conservatives, one quarter (24%) would vote for Newt Gingrich, 16% for Mitt Romney, and 11% forRon Paul. Just over one-quarter of Tea Party supporters (27%) would vote for New Gingrich in the Republican primary, 15% would vote for Mitt Romney, and 12% for Ron Paul, while 30% are not at all sure.

If the primary was just a two person race, two-in-five Republicans (40%) would vote for Newt Gingrich and three-in-ten would vote for Mitt Romney with 30% not at all sure. Among Tea Party supporters, 44% would vote for the former Speaker and one-quarter (25%) for the former Massachusetts Governor while three-in-ten (31%) say they are not at all sure. Looking at Conservatives, two-in-five (41%) would vote for Newt Gingrich, one-quarter (26%) for Mitt Romney, and one-third (33%) are not at all sure.

Head to head match-ups

While Newt Gingrich may be ahead in the primary race, Mitt Romney makes it a closer race against President Obama. If the presidential election were held today, 43% of Americans would vote for President Obama, 40% would vote for Mitt Romney and 17% are not at all sure. Last month it was a tie, with 41% of U.S. adults saying they would vote for the President and 41% saying they would vote for Mitt Romney.

Looking at the probable swing states for 2012 (Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire,North Carolina, Ohio, and Virginia), 42% of people from those states would vote for Mitt Romney and 39% would vote for President Obama; 19% are not at all sure.  Among Independents, 41% would vote for Romney and 39% for the President.

Newt Gingrich may now be on top among the Republican nominees, but in a head to head match-up he is further behind the President as 45% of Americans would vote for President Obama and 38% would vote forNewt Gingrich, with 17% saying they are not at all sure.  Looking at Independents, 43% would vote for President Obama, 38% would vote for Newt Gingrich, and 19% are not at all sure.  Among the 2012 swing states, however, it becomes a much closer race with 42% voting for the President and 41% voting forNewt Gingrich.

So What?

One month from now the race for the Republican nomination will probably have a very different look. Iowaand New Hampshire will be in the past and the candidates that remain in the race, having made a decent enough showing in those first states to continue, will  be moving on to South Carolina and Florida. Will it be a two person race between Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich? Or, will a third person, maybe Ron Paul, who is the only other candidate in double digits now, move ahead?  How this races moves from there is anyone’s guess, but the current thinking is that this nomination fight will continue into March at least.

 

TABLE 1
REPUBLICAN PRIMARY ELECTION
“If you were voting in the Republican primary election and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?”

Base: All adults

         
  Total

 Dec

2011

Political Party Political Philosophy Tea

Party

Support

Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib.
% % % % % % % %
Mitt Romney 14 17 15 14 16 14 10 15
Newt Gingrich 12 27 4 11 24 8 2 27
Ron Paul 11 11 7 14 11 10 14 12
Jon Huntsman, Jr. 6 1 9 7 * 7 11 2
Michele Bachmann 4 6 1 5 8 3 2 7
Rick Perry 3 3 1 5 4 3 1 4
Rick Santorum 2 3 2 1 3 1 2 3
Not at all sure 49 32 61 43 33 54 58 30

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; * indicates less than 0.5%

 

 

 

TABLE 2
ROMNEY VS GINGRICH
“If you were voting in the Republican primary and these were the candidates, who would you vote for?”

Base: All adults

  Total Tea

Party

Support

Party ID Philosophy
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib.
% % % % % % % %
Mitt Romney 31 25 30 34 35 26 33 34
Newt Gingrich 20 44 40 7 19 41 13 6
Not at all sure 49 31 30 60 46 33 54 60

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding


 

TABLE 3A
ROMNEY VS. OBAMA
“If the presidential election were held today and these were the two candidates, for whom would you most likely vote?”

Base: All adults

  Total Oct Total

Nov

Total

Dec

Party ID Philosophy
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib.
% % % % % % % % %
Mitt Romney 40 41 40 82 8 41 72 34 6
Barack Obama 41 41 43 5 81 39 14 46 79
Not at all sure 18 18 17 13 11 20 13 20 15

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

 

 

 

TABLE 3B
ROMNEY VS. OBAMA
“If the presidential election were held today and these were the two candidates, for whom would you most likely vote?”

Base: All adults

  Total Partisan Swing States
Mod./

Ind.

Cons./

Tea Party

2012 5% in

2008

% % % % %
Mitt Romney 40 38 96 42 43
Barack Obama 43 39 * 39 38
Not at all sure 17 23 4 19 19

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio; – indicates no response

 

 

 

TABLE 4A
GINGRICH VS OBAMA
“If the presidential election were held today and these were the two candidates, for whom would you most likely vote?”

Base: All adults

  Total

Dec

Party ID Philosophy
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib.
% % % % % % %
Newt Gingrich 38 80 7 38 72 31 6
Barack Obama 45 7 82 43 15 49 80
Not at all sure 17 12 11 19 13 19 14

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

 


TABLE 5B
GINGRICH VS. OBAMA
“If the presidential election were held today and these were the two candidates, for whom would you most likely vote?”

Base: All adults

  Total Partisan Swing States
Mod./

Ind.

Cons./

Tea Party

2012 5% in

2008

% % % % %
Newt Gingrich 38 33 96 41 42
Barack Obama 45 45 * 42 40
Not at all sure 17 22 4 17 18

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio; – indicates no response

One in Five Conservatives Believe Mitt Romney Is Too Liberal

NEW YORK, Dec. 14, 2011 — It’s just a few weeks until the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary and the Republican nomination fight is, once again, going through some changes. But, one thing that has remained constant through the past few months is that Mitt Romney has been at or near the top. One reason, however, the former Governor of Massachusetts may not have quite sealed the deal with voters yet is that, even after running for Republican nomination in 2008, people may not yet be sure who he is.

Among all Americans, two in five like Mitt Romney as a person (40%), over one-third (36%) say they like his track record as governor and one-third (33%) like his political opinions. But over one-third of U.S. adults also say they are not sure about Mitt Romney as a person (34%), not sure about his track record as governor (38%) and not sure about his political opinions (34%).

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,499 adults surveyed online between November 7 and 14, 2011 by Harris Interactive .

Among Republicans almost three in five (58%) like Mitt Romney as a person, half (49%) like his track record as governor and 57% like his political opinions. Among Conservatives, these numbers drop a little. Just half of Conservatives like Mitt Romney as a person (49%) and like his political opinions (48%) while just two in five Conservatives like his track record as governor (39%).

When given some statements about Mitt Romney, again there is a little bit of the unknown. Just over half of Americans (54%) say Mitt Romney is an intelligent person with one-third (32%) saying they are not sure and while half (49%) believe his business experience would be an asset, again one-third (32%) are not sure.  Romney has also been charged with “flip-flopping” and 44% of Americans agree that his stance on issues depends on who he is talking to, not his core convictions, with over one-third (36%) not sure about this.

However, just 20% of Americans say Mitt Romney lacks experience and is not qualified to be president with half (48%) disagreeing with that statement but, again, one-third (32%) are not sure. The issue of religion has also been raised and while 52% of Americans say Mitt Romney being Mormon is not an issue, one-quarter say it is (23%) and the same number are not sure (25%). The one thing that evenly divides Americans is if he inspires confidence personally. One third of Americans think Mitt Romney does (35%), one third says he does not (33%), and one-third are not sure (32%).

Among Republicans, two-thirds believe Mitt Romney is intelligent (69%) and that his business experience would be an asset (67%), while over half (53%) say he inspires confidence personally. Just over one-quarter (27%) say his being Mormon is an issue but two in five Republicans (41%) say his stance on issues depends on who he is talking to and not his core convictions. His numbers are a little weaker among Conservatives as just three in five say he is an intelligent person (61%) and that his business experience is an asset (61%) with less than half (46%) agreeing he inspires confidence personally. Slightly over two in five (43%) agree his stance on issues depends on who he is talking to and not his core convictions while one-quarter (26%) say his being Mormon is an issue.

Looking at Mitt Romney’s political ideology, one in ten Americans (8%) say he is too liberal, compared to 15% of Republicans and one in five Conservatives (20%). On the flip side, 16% of U.S. adults say Mitt Romney is too conservative. One-third of Americans (32%) say he is neither too liberal nor too conservative but almost half (45%) are not sure, including one-third of Republicans (34%) and two in five Conservatives (39%).

If Mitt Romney was the Republican nominee, one-third of Americans (33%) would vote for him, 38% would not and 25% are not sure. Two-thirds of Republicans (65%) would vote for him, but just over half of Conservatives (57%) say the same. Two in five Independents (40%) would vote for Mitt Romney while one-third would not (34%) but among Moderates two in five would not vote for him (39%) while 27% would.

So What?
With the Republican primary this year, much can change in a week, let alone three weeks, so it’s still anyone’s guess what will actually happen in Iowa and New Hampshire. But, one thing is certain. For someone who in his second run for the Republican nomination, Mitt Romney has not done a great job of defining who he is and what he stands for. Others have defined him and that may be one of the main reasons he has not been able to run away with the nomination, even though he’s been the “front-runner” for almost the whole of 2011.

 

TABLE 1
PERCEPTION OF MITT ROMNEY
“Thinking about presidential politics, looking at the list of attributes, please indicate how you feel about each.”
Base: All adults
Total Like (NET) Strongly like Somewhat like Total
Dislike (NET)
Somewhat dislike Strongly dislike Not sure
% % % % % % %
Mitt Romney as a person 40 12 28 26 14 12 34
Mitt Romney’s track record as a governor 36 7 29 26 16 10 38
Mitt Romney’s political opinions 33 8 26 33 16 16 34

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding


TABLE 1A
PERCEPTION OF MITT ROMNEY – SUMMARY OF LIKE
“Thinking about presidential politics, looking at the list of attributes, please indicate how you feel about each.”
Those saying “Strongly/Somewhat like”
Base: All adults
Total Party ID Party Philosophy Swing States
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib. 2012 2008
% % % % % % % % %
Mitt Romney as a person 40 58 30 44 49 37 32 41 41
Mitt Romney’s track record as a governor 36 49 29 41 39 36 31 35 35
Mitt Romney’s political opinions 33 57 18 39 48 31 14 33 34

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio

 

 

TABLE 2
ATTITUDES TOWARDS MITT ROMNEY
“Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements about Mitt Romney.”
Base: All adults
Total Agree (NET) Strongly agree Somewhat agree Total Disagree (NET) Somewhat disagree Strongly disagree Not sure
% % % % % % %
He is a very intelligent person 54 17 37 14 8 6 32
His business experience would be an asset 49 15 34 19 11 8 32
His stance on issues depends on who he’s speaking to, not his core convictions 44 18 25 21 14 7 36
He inspires confidence personally 35 8 28 33 18 15 32
His being a Mormon is an issue 23 10 13 52 12 39 25
He lacks experience and is unqualified to be president 20 8 12 48 26 22 32

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding


TABLE 2A
ATTITUDES TOWARDS MITT ROMNEY – SUMMARY OF AGREE
“Please indicate whether you agree or disagree with the following statements about Mitt Romney.”
Those saying “Strongly/Somewhat agree”
Base: All adults
Total Party ID Party Philosophy Swing States
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib. 2012 2008
% % % % % % % % %
He is a very intelligent person 54 69 47 60 61 51 50 54 53
His business experience would be an asset 49 67 36 57 61 47 35 49 47
His stance on issues depends on who he’s speaking to, not his core convictions 44 41 51 46 43 41 51 43 41
He inspires confidence personally 35 53 23 40 46 32 25 38 37
His being a Mormon is an issue 23 27 26 20 26 21 24 18 20
He lacks experience and is unqualified to be president 20 13 28 19 17 19 26 19 20

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio

 

TABLE 3
MITT ROMNEY’S POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
“Do you think Mitt Romney…?”
Base: All adults
Total Party ID Party Philosophy Swing States
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons. Mod. Lib. 2012 2008
% % % % % % % % %
Is too liberal 8 15 3 8 19 3 * 8 7
Is neither too liberal nor too conservative 32 48 20 37 42 30 19 30 29
Is too conservative 16 3 32 12 1 14 45 18 19
Not sure 45 34 45 43 39 53 36 44 45

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio; * indicates less than 1%


TABLE 4
VOTING FOR MITT ROMNEY
“If Mitt Romney was the Republican nominee for President, which is closest to the way you think?”
Base: All adults
Total Party ID Party Philosophy Swing States
Rep. Dem. Ind. Cons Mod. Lib. 2012 2008
% % % % % % % % %
Would vote for him (NET) 33 65 8 40 57 27 8 36 33
  I definitely would vote for him 16 35 2 17 33 10 2 18 18
  I probably would vote for him 17 30 6 22 24 17 6 18 15
Would not vote for him (NET) 38 12 67 34 15 39 71 36 36
  I probably would not vote for him 13 5 18 14 7 15 17 12 11
  I definitely would not vote for him 25 7 49 20 8 24 55 24 26
I wouldn’t vote at all 5 1 5 4 5 5 4 5 5
Not sure 25 22 20 22 23 29 17 24 26

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding; 2012 Swing States are Colorado, Florida,Indiana, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia; 5% states in 2008 are Florida,Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina and Ohio

« Older Entries