Tag Archives: Muslim

Out of the Frying Pan Into the Fire

 

Charter Schools Might Be Just as Scary as Public Schools

Today, I learned the hard way how easy it is to get caught up in something that you would want no part of. Thankfully I learned the full story before it was too late.

I am a mother of 5 with kids ranging from 3 to 9 years old and they attend public school- for now!

We have considered private school, but with four children already in school and another one that will be in school in 2 years, the cost of private school is just not a possible choice for us.

This has been an ongoing struggle of mine and my husband’s since our first child entered the public school system. We have contemplated home-schooling, and at one point we were very close to pulling them out of public school mid-year to make that a reality.

We also have considered charter schools. I became aware of the charter school option last year and began researching them. Unfortunately, I still had a lot of unanswered questions by the time school enrolled for this current year so we chose to keep them at their current school.

As the year has progressed we have had several situations come up that have once again left us knowing that we have to make some changes soon.

My husband and I have been praying desperately about what to do. Up until this point neither of us has received a clear answer to our prayers.

Since we are not involved in a church we want to make sure our children have a social outlet. If we do end up homeschooling I know that I will become a part of a homeschooling group so they can have social interaction with kids their own age.

In the midst of our frustration and continuous prayer- just two weeks ago- an “answer to prayer” presented itself through the mail. We received a mail-out about a charter school opening in our area. We read the literature and checked things out online. It seemed to be a very promising possibility! I filled out the online registration form for each of my school age children. We then left it all in God’s hands.

On Saturday I received a call inviting us to the open house which is for tonight. I accepted the invitation with much excitement and immediately called my husband, who was out running an errand. Things most certainly looked as though God was providing us an answer to our desperate prayers!

Now, let me back up just a bit for a couple of side-notes.

We have friends who enrolled their kids in a charter school right after the start of this school year. They, too, have had nothing but issue after issue with the public school system. If it was not one thing with one child, it was another thing with another child. She finally had enough, pulled her kids out of public school and immediately enrolled them into this charter school. She insisted that I should check this school out for my kids, knowing the ongoing issues and frustrations we are having as well.

The more questions I asked the more reservations I had. The principal of the school is Turkish. The school teaches the Turkish language as a foreign language. The school participates in the yearly Turkish Festival in Houston.

She and her previous husband were stationed in Turkey with the military several years ago, so she was very excited about this. Though I could give no concrete reason why, there was something that just did not set well with me after hearing all this information. No, I am not in any way racist against the Turkish people. It just seemed a bit odd to me that a charter school would be so focused on one specific nationality.  If it is about teaching diversity they are most certainly lacking in accomplishing that goal!

Just last week I happened to see a news article stating that the FBI was investigating US Charter Schools with Turkish links. I read the article and thought to myself, “Yep! I knew there was a reason why I was uncomfortable with that specific Charter School!”

I have not thought much about it since reading the article. I vaguely remember thinking that I wanted to tell my husband about it, because we both had reservations with the school our friends enrolled their kids in. As is normal with life, things got busy and it completely slipped my mind to discuss the article with him.

So, here we are back to today. The kids come home from school and I immediately start the shower line. With this many kids shower time has to be planned out.

All of the kids are showered and dressed and are working on homework. We are just waiting for the hands of the clock to tick away so we can leave for Open House. I’ve glanced at the clock a few times, hoping and praying that my husband can be home in time to go with us.

My telephone rings. It is my husband. Before I answer the phone I have a passing thought, “Don’t tell me he is going to be longer than is expected! I want him to go with us tonight!” I answer the phone, and his first words to me were, “We may have to rethink what we are going to do.” I asked him what he was referring to and he tells me that he’s been doing some deeper research into the Charter School after seeing the news article regarding the FBI Investigation. I slapped my forehead, frustrated because I have forgotten to tell him about it!

We began discussing the article and his further research, and it seems as though the new Charter School where we have an appointment is directly tied in with the organization that is being investigated by the FBI! He said he did not want to completely dismiss the idea, because in his research he saw a lot of conflicting reports. Some parents were not happy with the organization, many were extremely happy with it.

We decided that we would still go to check everything out but we would make no commitments until we processed everything, talked about it, and of course prayed about it, above all.

We ended our conversation so he could finish up what he was doing to head home.

As I began tidying up the counter, I picked up the weekly newspaper. My intention was to sort through the coupons, as is my weekly routine, browse quickly through the actual newspaper, and throw everything away that I don’t need. When I opened the newspaper up my heart literally began to race!

Right there on the front page was an article about the new school opening up! No, it was not an article exposing the school as one of the Turkish connected schools that is being investigated- it was simply an article about the ribbon cutting ceremony which is coming up this Friday and the fact that they are seeking more students. Near the end of the article it named the organization they were funded by- as well as funds from the taxpayers of the state of Texas!

I immediately went to the internet and did a quick search on the name of the organization- the Cosmos Foundation and here is what I found.

As I read the article at the above link discusses how there is a huge mystery surrounding the foundation, and the fact that when interviewing the superintendant of Harmony Schools more questions arose than were actually answered. The administrator being interviewed adamantly denied that neither the schools nor the organization have any ties with Fethullah Gulen or his movement which has long-term goal to create a “universal caliphate”.

It article also stated that there is “evidence that the Turkish administrators of Harmony are operating under the Islamic principle of taqiyya or “holy deception.” The administrators for this school system/organization have no problem LYING about who they are and who they are connected with! And yet we are supposed to believe him when he says there is no connection to the radical Gulen?

I am trying to teach my children to tell the TRUTH NO MATTER WHAT, and the administrators of the school I was considering sending them to have no problem with deception if it is defined by their beliefs as “holy” and fits their purpose! I am sure the “tolerant leftists” would urge me not to jump to conclusions! To these people I ask, “What in the world would make me believe they would actually tell me THE TRUTH!?”

Before I finished the article I called my husband back to tell him our plans for the evening had changed, that after seeing the article in the newspaper and doing further investigating there is no way on God’s green earth that I am going to expose my children to this!

Now, I am sure there are people that will read this and call me a racist, a bigot, a right-wing nut, a conspiracy theorist or any other derogatory term that is so often hurled around by the “tolerant leftists”. That is fine- call me what you will! However, last time I check, The United States of America is still a free country- at least at this time!  I have a choice on where my children go to school, whether it is public school, private school, a charter school or home school. If you choose to send your child to a charter school that is part of an organization that is being investigated by the FBI then that is your choice! I will not try to change your mind. You are free to make your choice, leave my choice for my children up to me!

I already have to counter-teach the secular humanism they are being taught in public school! Given the choice I would much rather have to teach against secular humanism than the strong possibility of having to teach against a religion that teaches that “god” instructs you to kill those who do not believe as you do and that it is ok to lie if it is a “holy lie”!

As a believer in Christ Jesus I know what The Bible teaches.  John 10:10 says, “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.” If Islam/Muslims teach that you should kill those who do not believe as you do this is proof in and of itself that it is a religion straight from the thief- Satan- and the very pits of hell! My Jesus came that all that believe in Him will have life- eternal life- to the fullest! Given the choice I cannot imagine how anyone would actually choose to believe in something that seeks to steal, kill and destroy rather than give life abundant. However, millions of people still choose to believe the lies of this religion.

Now, for those who would choose to attack me by saying that not all Muslims are radical, and in fact, most Muslims are very peace loving people who do not believe in killing infidels, then I say that is fine. This is a free country and they have a choice to believe as they choose. I will not try to change their mind or pressure them or persuade them that my beliefs are right. That is not my job. Yes, I pray for these people, because again, The Bible is very clear that Jesus Christ is the ONLY Way, the ONLY  Truth, and the ONLY Life. No one… NO ONE- comes to The Father- God- except through Him- The Son. (John 14:6) But I know that there is nothing within my power to change someone’s beliefs. That is left to God and the person themselves, whether they choose to have an open mind and heart.

In the very depths of my heart I feel that we averted a crisis tonight. If we had moved our kids from public school to this charter school that is directly connected with the schools that are being investigated by the FBI I believe with every fiber of my being that we would have been jumping out of the frying pan into the fire. Yes, we still have another crisis of sorts to deal with. We know that public school is not the answer for our children. We know that we must make some very difficult decisions very soon. For now, our prayers and our search continue. We have reached a point where we know we have to make a change in our children’s education.

Parents, BEWARE! In your frustration with the state of our public school system I warn you to not allow desperation to take over. I believed that this was possibly an answer to our fervent prayers for a solution in our frustration with the public school system. Sometimes what we perceive as an answer from God very well could be from Satan.

One thing that I learned in my searching is that the taxpayers of Texas pay $41 million a year to this organization to run these charter schools. I also learned that Texas Congressman Randy Neugebauer- a Republican- supports these schools, and former President George W. Bush invited students from the Academy to The White House. And now the FBI is investigating them because these schools appear to be breeding grounds to accomplish Gulen’s goal of a universal caliphate!? Yet another reason why I do not trust a single one of our elected officials!

Obama and Religion

The latest polls say that 1 in 4 believe Obama to be a Muslim. Obama is not a Muslim, but his chosen faith isn’t really Christianity, but a perversion called Black Liberation Theology (BLT). In BLT there is only the oppressors and the oppressed. This is very important to understand as we go through his statements. First lets look at a statement from his book The Audacity of Hope Via Snopes and truthorfiction.com: (emphasis mine)

Page 261 The Audacity of Hope

“Of course, not all my conversations in immigrant communities follow this easy pattern. In the wake of 9/11, my meetings with Arab and Pakistani Americans, for example, have a more urgent quality, for the stories of detentions and FBI questioning and hard stares from neighbors have shaken their sense of security and belonging.  They have been reminded that the history of immigration in this country has a dark underbelly; they need specific assurances that their citizenship really means something, that America has learned the right lessons from the Japanese internments during World War II, and that I will stand with them should the political winds shift in an ugly direction.”

He is not saying I am Muslim, but those he associates with, such as Rashid Khalidi, have convinced him that Muslims, or more specifically in this case American Muslims are  another oppressed minority. Keeping with his distorted Christianity he advocates that he must “stand with them” if the US begins internment camps like during World War II or if “the political winds shift in an ugly direction” in general.

In 2004 Obama sat down for an interview with Cathleen Falsani, a columnist for the Chicago Sun Times. The subject was his religion. The Website Beliefnet.com reposted the interview in it’s entirety in 2008. I have reposted it below in it’s entirety: (Emphasis other than names is mine)

FALSANI:
What do you believe?

OBAMA:
I am a Christian.

So, I have a deep faith. So I draw from the Christian faith.

On the other hand, I was born in Hawaii where obviously there are a lot of Eastern influences.

I lived in Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world, between the ages of six and 10.

My father was from Kenya, and although he was probably most accurately labeled an agnostic, his father was Muslim.

And I’d say, probably, intellectually I’ve drawn as much from Judaism as any other faith.

(A patron stops and says, “Congratulations,” shakes his hand. “Thank you very much. I appreciate that. Thank you.”)

So, I’m rooted in the Christian tradition. I believe that there are many paths to the same place, and that is a belief that there is a higher power, a belief that we are connected as a people. That there are values that transcend race or culture, that move us forward, and there’s an obligation for all of us individually as well as collectively to take responsibility to make those values lived.

And so, part of my project in life was probably to spend the first 40 years of my life figuring out what I did believe – I’m 42 now – and it’s not that I had it all completely worked out, but I’m spending a lot of time now trying to apply what I believe and trying to live up to those values.
FALSANI:
Have you always been a Christian?

OBAMA:
I was raised more by my mother and my mother was Christian.

FALSANI:
Any particular flavor?

OBAMA:
No.

My grandparents who were from small towns in Kansas. My grandmother was Methodist. My grandfather was Baptist. This was at a time when I think the Methodists felt slightly superior to the Baptists. And by the time I was born, they were, I think, my grandparents had joined a Universalist church.

So, my mother, who I think had as much influence on my values as anybody, was not someone who wore her religion on her sleeve. We’d go to church for Easter. She wasn’t a church lady.

As I said, we moved to Indonesia. She remarried an Indonesian who wasn’t particularly, he wasn’t a practicing Muslim. I went to a Catholic school in a Muslim country. So I was studying the Bible and catechisms by day, and at night you’d hear the prayer call.

So I don’t think as a child we were, or I had a structured religious education. But my mother was deeply spiritual person, and would spend a lot of time talking about values and give me books about the world’s religions, and talk to me about them. And I think always, her view always was that underlying these religions were a common set of beliefs about how you treat other people and how you aspire to act, not just for yourself but also for the greater good.

And, so that, I think, was what I carried with me through college. I probably didn’t get started getting active in church activities until I moved to Chicago.

The way I came to Chicago in 1985 was that I was interested in community organizing and I was inspired by the Civil Rights movement. And the idea that ordinary people could do extraordinary things. And there was a group of churches out on the South Side of Chicago that had come together to form an organization to try to deal with the devastation of steel plants that had closed. And didn’t have much money, but felt that if they formed an organization and hired somebody to organize them to work on issues that affected their community, that it would strengthen the church and also strengthen the community.

So they hired me, for $13,000 a year. The princely sum. And I drove out here and I didn’t know anybody and started working with both the ministers and the lay people in these churches on issues like creating job training programs, or afterschool programs for youth, or making sure that city services were fairly allocated to underserved communites.

This would be in Roseland, West Pullman, Altgeld Gardens, far South Side working class and lower income communities.

And it was in those places where I think what had been more of an intellectual view of religion deepened because I’d be spending an enormous amount of time with church ladies, sort of surrogate mothers and fathers and everybody I was working with was 50 or 55 or 60, and here I was a 23-year-old kid running around.

I became much more familiar with the ongoing tradition of the historic black church and it’s importance in the community.

And the power of that culture to give people strength in very difficult circumstances, and the power of that church to give people courage against great odds. And it moved me deeply.

So that, one of the churches I met, or one of the churches that I became involved in was Trinity United Church of Christ. And the pastor there, Jeremiah Wright, became a good friend. So I joined that church and committed myself to Christ inKill Whitey that church.
FALSANI:
Did you actually go up for an altar call?

OBAMA:
Yes. Absolutely.

It was a daytime service, during a daytime service. And it was a powerful moment. Because, it was powerful for me because it not only confirmed my faith, it not only gave shape to my faith, but I think, also, allowed me to connect the work I had been pursuing with my faith.

FALSANI:
How long ago?

OBAMA:
16, 17 years ago. 1987 or 88

FALSANI:
So you got yourself born again?

OBAMA:
Yeah, although I don’t, I retain from my childhood and my experiences growing up a suspicion of dogma. And I’m not somebody who is always comfortable with language that implies I’ve got a monopoly on the truth, or that my faith is automatically transferable to others.

I’m a big believer in tolerance. I think that religion at it’s best comes with a big dose of doubt. I’m suspicious of too much certainty in the pursuit of understanding just because I think people are limited in their understanding.

I think that, particularly as somebody who’s now in the public realm and is a student of what brings people together and what drives them apart, there’s an enormous amount of damage done around the world in the name of religion and certainty.

FALSANI
Do you still attend Trinity?

OBAMA:
Yep. Every week. 11 oclock service.

Ever been there? Good service.

I actually wrote a book called Dreams from My Father, it’s kind of a meditation on race. There’s a whole chapter on the church in that, and my first visits to Trinity.

FALSANI:
Do you pray often?

OBAMA:
Uh, yeah, I guess I do.

Its’ not formal, me getting on my knees. I think I have an ongoing conversation with God. I think throughout the day, I’m constantly asking myself questions about what I’m doing, why am I doing it.

One of the interesting things about being in public life is there are constantly these pressures being placed on you from different sides. To be effective, you have to be able to listen to a variety of points of view, synthesize viewpoints. You also have to know when to be just a strong advocate, and push back against certain people or views that you think aren’t right or don’t serve your constituents.

And so, the biggest challenge, I think, is always maintaining your moral compass. Those are the conversations I’m having internally. I’m measuring my actions against that inner voice that for me at least is audible, is active, it tells me where I think I’m on track and where I think I’m off track.

It’s interesting particularly now after this election, comes with it a lot of celebrity. And I always think of politics as having two sides. There’s a vanity aspect to politics, and then there’s a substantive part of politics. Now you need some sizzle with the steak to be effective, but I think it’s easy to get swept up in the vanity side of it, the desire to be liked and recognized and important. It’s important for me throughout the day to measure and to take stock and to say, now, am I doing this because I think it’s advantageous to me politically, or because I think it’s the right thing to do? Am I doing this to get my name in the papers or am I doing this because it’s necessary to accomplish my motives.

FALSANI:
Checking for altruism?

OBAMA:
Yeah. I mean, something like it.

Looking for, … It’s interesting, the most powerful political moments for me come when I feel like my actions are aligned with a certain truth. I can feel it. When I’m talking to a group and I’m saying something truthful, I can feel a power that comes out of those statements that is different than when I’m just being glib or clever.

FALSANI:
What’s that power? Is it the holy spirit? God?

OBAMA:
Well, I think it’s the power of the recognition of God, or the recognition of a larger truth that is being shared between me and an audience.

Preaching at TrinityThat’s something you learn watching ministers, quite a bit. What they call the Holy Spirit. They want the Holy Spirit to come down before they’re preaching, right? Not to try to intellectualize it but what I see is there are moments that happen within a sermon where the minister gets out of his ego and is speaking from a deeper source. And it’s powerful.

There are also times when you can see the ego getting in the way. Where the minister is performing and clearly straining for applause or an Amen. And those are distinct moments. I think those former moments are sacred.

FALSANI:
Who’s Jesus to you?

(He laughs nervously)

OBAMA:
Right.

Jesus is an historical figure for me, and he’s also a bridge between God and man, in the Christian faith, and one that I think is powerful precisely because he serves as that means of us reaching something higher.

And he’s also a wonderful teacher. I think it’s important for all of us, of whatever faith, to have teachers in the flesh and also teachers in history.

FALSANI:
Is Jesus someone who you feel you have a regular connection with now, a personal connection with in your life?

OBAMA:
Yeah. Yes. I think some of the things I talked about earlier are addressed through, are channeled through my Christian faith and a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.

FALSANI:
Have you read the bible?

OBAMA:
Absolutely.

I read it not as regularly as I would like. These days I don’t have much time for reading or reflection, period.

FALSANI:
Do you try to take some time for whatever, meditation prayer reading?

OBAMA:
I’ll be honest with you, I used to all the time, in a fairly disciplined way. But during the course of this campaign, I don’t. And I probably need to and would like to, but that’s where that internal monologue, or dialogue I think supplants my opportunity to read and reflect in a structured way these days.

It’s much more sort of as I’m going through the day trying to take stock and take a moment here and a moment there to take stock, why am I here, how does this connect with a larger sense of purpose.

FALSANI:
Do you have people in your life that you look to for guidance?

OBAMA:
Well, my pastor [Jeremiah Wright] is certainly someone who I have an enormous amount of respect for.

I have a number of friends who are ministers. Reverend Meeks is a close friend and colleague of mine in the state Senate. Father Michael Pfleger is a dear friend, and somebody I interact with closely.

Meet Rev Wright courtesy of ABC News

Meet Father Michael Pfleger

Meet Reverend Meeks courtesy of CBS

FALSANI:
Those two will keep you on your toes.

OBAMA:
And theyr’e good friends. Because both of them are in the public eye, there are ways we can all reflect on what’s happening to each of us in ways that are useful.

I think they can help me, they can appreciate certain specific challenges that I go through as a public figure.

FALSANI:
Jack Ryan [Obama’s Republican opponent in the U.S. Senate race at the time] said talking about your faith is frought with peril for a public figure.

OBAMA:
Which is why you generally will not see me spending a lot of time talking about it on the stump.

Alongside my own deep personal faith, I am a follower, as well, of our civic religion. I am a big believer in the separation of church and state. I am a big believer in our constitutional structure. I mean, I’m a law professor at the University of Chicago teaching constitutional law. I am a great admirer of our founding charter, and its resolve to prevent theocracies from forming, and its resolve to prevent disruptive strains of fundamentalism from taking root ion this country.

As I said before, in my own public policy, I’m very suspicious of religious certainty expressing itself in politics.

Now, that’s different form a belief that values have to inform our public policy. I think it’s perfectly consistent to say that I want my government to be operating for all faiths and all peoples, including atheists and agnostics, while also insisting that there are values that inform my politics that are appropriate to talk about.

A standard line in my stump speech during this campaign is that my politics are informed by a belief that we’re all connected. That if there’s a child on the South Side of Chicago that can’t read, that makes a difference in my life even if it’s not my own child. If there’s a senior citizen in downstate Illinois that’s struggling to pay for their medicine and having to chose between medicine and the rent, that makes my life poorer even if it’s not my grandparent. And if there’s an Arab American family that’s being rounded up by John Ashcroft without the benefit of due process, that threatens my civil liberties.

Obama discusses Collective Salvation

I can give religious expression to that. I am my brother’s keeper, I am my sister’s keeper, we are all children of God. Or I can express it in secular terms. But the basic premise remains the same. I think sometimes Democrats have made the mistake of shying away from a conversation about values for fear that they sacrifice the important value of tolerance. And I don’t think those two things are mutually exclusive.

FALSANI:
Do you think it’s wrong for people to want to know about a civic leader’s spirituality?

OBAMA:
I don’t’ think it’s wrong. I think that political leaders are subject to all sorts of vetting by the public, and this can be a component of that.

I think that I am disturbed by, let me put it this way: I think there is an enormous danger on the part of public figures to rationalize or justify their actions by claiming God’s mandate.

I think there is this tendency that I don’t think is healthy for public figures to wear religion on their sleeve as a means to insulate themselves from criticism, or dialogue with people who disagree with them.

FALSANI:
The conversation stopper, when you say you’re a Christian and leave it at that.

OBAMA:
Where do you move forward with that?

This is something that I’m sure I’d have serious debates with my fellow Christians about. I think that the difficult thing about any religion, including Christianity, is that at some level there is a call to evangelize and prostelytize. There’s the belief, certainly in some quarters, that people haven’t embraced Jesus Christ as their personal savior that they’re going to hell.

FALSANI:
You don’t believe that?

OBAMA:
I find it hard to believe that my God would consign four-fifths of the world to hell.

I can’t imagine that my God would allow some little Hindu kid in India who never interacts with the Christian faith to somehow burn for all eternity.

That’s just not part of my religious makeup.

Part of the reason I think it’s always difficult for public figures to talk about this is that the nature of politics is that you want to have everybody like you and project the best possible traits onto you. Oftentimes that’s by being as vague as possible, or appealing to the lowest commong denominators. The more specific and detailed you are on issues as personal and fundamental as your faith, the more potentially dangerous it is.

FALSANI:
Do you ever have people who know you’re a Christian question a particular stance you take on an issue, how can you be a Christian and …

OBAMA:
Like the right to choose.

I haven’t been challenged in those direct ways. And to that extent, I give the public a lot of credit. I’m always stuck by how much common sense the American people have. They get confused sometimes, watch FoxNews or listen to talk radio. That’s dangerous sometimes. But generally, Americans are tolerant and I think recognize that faith is a personal thing, and they may feel very strongly about an issue like abortion or gay marriage, but if they discuss it with me as an elected official they will discuss it with me in those terms and not, say, as ‘you call yourself a Christian.’ I cannot recall that ever happening.

FALSANI:
Do you get questions about your faith?

OBAMA:
Obviously as an African American politician rooted in the African American community, I spend a lot of time in the black church. I have no qualms in those settings in participating fully in those services and celebrating my God in that wonderful community that is the black church.

(he pauses)
But I also try to be . . . Rarely in those settings do people come up to me and say, what are your beliefs. They are going to presume, and rightly so. Although they may presume a set of doctrines that I subscribe to that I don’t necessarily subscribe to.

But I don’t think that’s unique to me. I think that each of us when we walk into our church or mosque or synagogue are interpreting that experience in different ways, are reading scriptures in different ways and are arriving at our own understanding at different ways and in different phases.

I don’t know a healthy congregation or an effective minister who doesn’t recognize that.

If all it took was someone proclaiming I believe Jesus Christ and that he died for my sins, and that was all there was to it, people wouldn’t have to keep coming to church, would they.

FALSANI:
Do you believe in heaven?

OBAMA:
Do I believe in the harps and clouds and wings?

FALSANI:
A place spiritually you go to after you die?

OBAMA:
What I believe in is that if I live my life as well as I can, that I will be rewarded. I don’t presume to have knowledge of what happens after I die. But I feel very strongly that whether the reward is in the here and now or in the hereafter, the aligning myself to my faith and my values is a good thing.

When I tuck in my daughters at night and I feel like I’ve been a good father to them, and I see in them that I am transferring values that I got from my mother and that they’re kind people and that they’re honest people, and they’re curious people, that’s a little piece of heaven.

FALSANI:
Do you believe in sin?

OBAMA:
Yes.

FALSANI:
What is sin?

OBAMA:
Being out of alignment with my values.

FALSANI:
What happens if you have sin in your life?

OBAMA:
I think it’s the same thing as the question about heaven. In the same way that if I’m true to myself and my faith that that is its own reward, when I’m not true to it, it’s its own punishment.

FALSANI:
Where do you find spiritual inspiration? Music, nature, literature, people, a conduit you plug into?

OBAMA:
There are so many.

Nothing is more powerful than the black church experience. A good choir and a good sermon in the black church, it’s pretty hard not to be move and be transported.

I can be transported by watching a good performance of Hamlet, or reading Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon, or listening to Miles Davis.

FALSANI:
Is there something that you go back to as a touchstone, a book, a particular piece of music, a place …

OBAMA:
As I said before, in my own sort of mental library, the Civil Rights movement has a powerful hold on me. It’s a point in time where I think heaven and earth meet. Because it’s a moment in which a collective faith transforms everything. So when I read Gandhi or I read King or I read certain passages of Abraham Lincoln and I think about those times where people’s values are tested, I think those inspire me.

FALSANI:
What are you doing when you feel the most centered, the most aligned spiritually?

OBAMA:
I think I already described it. It’s when I’m being true to myself. And that can happen in me making a speech or it can happen in me playing with my kids, or it can happen in a small interaction with a security guard in a building when I’m recognizing them and exchanging a good word.

FALSANI:
Is there someone you would look to as an example of how not to do it?

OBAMA:
Bin Laden.

(grins broadly)

FALSANI:
… An example of a role model, who combined everything you said you want to do in your life, and your faith?

OBAMA:
I think Gandhi is a great example of a profoundly spiritual man who acted and risked everything on behalf of those values but never slipped into intolerance or dogma. He seemed to always maintain an air of doubt about him.

I think Dr. King, and Lincoln. Those three are good examples for me of people who applied their faith to a larger canvas without allowing that faith to metasticize into something that is hurtful.

FALSANI:
Can we go back to that morning service in 1987 or 88 — when you have a moment that you can go back to that as an epiphany…

OBAMA:
It wasn’t an epiphany.

It was much more of a gradual process for me. I know there are some people who fall out. Which is wonderful. God bless them. For me it was probably because there is a certain self-consciousness that I possess as somebody with probably too much book learning, and also a very polyglot background.

FALSANI:
It wasn’t like a moment where you finally got it? It was a symbol of that decision?

OBAMA:
Exactly. I think it was just a moment to certify or publicly affirm a growing faith in me.

Theres quite alot in his statements here that should clue the reader into the fact that his chosen Christianity isn’t very Christian at all, but a perversion known as Black Liberation Theology. This movement is more Marxist than Christian and seperates all people into 2 camps, the oppressor and the oppressed. For a look into it we turn first to Discover the Networks: (Emphasis mine)

Black liberation theology is closely related to the broader phenomenon of liberation theology, which calls for social activism, class struggle, and even violent revolution aimed at overturning the “capitalist oppressors of the poor” and installing, in its place, a socialist utopia that will finally enfranchise the poor and downtrodden. As an extension of this movement, black liberation theology similarly seeks to foment Marxist revolutionary fervor but one founded on racial rather than class solidarity.

A clear definition of black liberation theology was first given formulation in 1969 by the National Committee of Black Church Men:

“Black theology is a theology of black liberation. It seeks to plumb the black condition in the light of God’s revelation in Jesus Christ, so that the black community can see that the gospel is commensurate with the achievements of black humanity. Black theology is a theology of ‘blackness.’  It is the affirmation of black humanity that emancipates black people from White racism, thus providing authentic freedom for both white and black people. It affirms the humanity of white people in that it says ‘No’ to the encroachment of white oppression.”

The chief architect of black liberation theology was James Cone, author of Black Theology and Black Power. One of the tasks of this movement, according to Cone, is to analyze the nature of the gospel of Jesus Christ in light of the experience of blacks who have long been victimized by white oppressors. According to black liberation theology, the inherent racism of white people precludes them from being able to recognize the humanity of nonwhites; moreover, their white supremacist orientation allegedly results in the establishment of a “white theology” that is irrevocably disconnected from the black experience. Consequently, liberation theologians contend that blacks need their own, race-specific theology to affirm their identity and their worth.

“What we need,” says Cone, “is the divine love as expressed in Black Power, which is the power of Black people to destroy their oppressors here and now by any means at their disposal. Unless God is participating in this holy activity, we must reject his love.” Observing that America was founded for white people, Cone calls for “the destruction of whiteness, which is the source of human misery in the world.” He advocates the use of Marxism as a tool of social analysis to help Christians to see “how things really are.”

Another prominent exponent of black liberation theology is the Ivy League professor Cornel West, who calls for “a serious dialogue between Black theologians and Marxist thinkers” — a dialogue that centers on the possibility of “mutually arrived-at political action.”

Black liberation theology entered the public consciousness in 2008 when the media focused on the racist sermons of Barack Obama’s minister Jeremiah Wright, a strong adherent of the movement.

Meet James Cone, the father of Black Liberation Theology and his explanations on his theology

Another look into Cone and Wright

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwEHyHyPZFs&feature=player_embedded#!

Now there are many that would use certain quotes to convince you he’s a Muslim

“Many other Americans have Muslims in their families or have lived in a Muslim majority country, I know because I am one of them.”

Meaning I am an American with Muslims in my family and have lived in a Muslim majority country (Indonesia), not I am a Muslim.

In pre-prepared speeches before the Muslim world he quoted the Quran in an effort of outreach to the Muslim world as part of his apology tour. Remember he believes they are oppressed people and moves to save them in accordance with collective salvation.  He can see eye to eye with Muslims because he has been taught through his chosen theology that it’s White People, Jews, and Capitalism that are evil. The Marxism comes from his mother, father, step-father, grandparents, and mentor Frank Marshall Davis.

Though his father and step father were Muslim he really didn’t have alot of exposure to them, nor the rest of his family in Kenya. He does have Muslim friends such as Rashid Khalidi. One key Muslim friend from the past that must be noted here is Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour who reportedly got Obama into Harvard Law through connections. If you isten to the teachings from Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour you will draw the conclusion that he isn’t preaching Islam, but Black Liberation Theology through Islam. You can hear James Cone’s work in the sermons of both Rev. Wright and the lectures of Dr. Mansour.

In closing Obama is not Muslim, but not Christian. He is a Marxist that has been given a theology to back up Marxism and racism. This theology preaches that Redistribution of Wealth is mandatory for all or you will never go to Heaven. This theory of Collective Salvation is just a way to hide Marxism within a religion and, having been raised on Communism, Obama bought it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akLlxxWaJZM

The Ground Zero Mosque Organization: a Twitter Interview

Today on twitter I asked the Ground Zero Mosque Organization, @Park51,  a simple question. I did not recieve a simple answer.

StopObama2012: Do you condemn Hamas as a Terrorist Organization? Tweet

Park51: We don’t engage foreign politics. We’re working to build moderate Muslim communities BTW how’s stopping Obama going? ^_^ Tweet

As you can see thats a blantant attempt to tap dance away from the issue. Sorry, I don’t play softball on terrorism.

StopObama2012: I call yr answer a No, U wnt condemn Hamas as a terrorist organization. Therefor U have no business calling yourselves Moderate Tweet

StopObama2012: Stopping Obama is going just fine, thank you Tweet

I can be civil :) But my statement is true, if you won’t condemn terrorism or those that embrace it, you are not a moderate Muslim. But then denial gets worse.

Park51: Stop trying to drag us into int’l political debates. Happy to discuss American Muslim issues. Tweet

So asking if you will condemn terrorism and terrorist organizations is dragging people into political debates? Really? And is not Terrorism an American Muslim issue. Are there not American victims of terrorism in all faiths and creeds?

StopObama2012: I asked you a simple question, you refuse to answer. Your showing your true colors, your not moderate at all. Tweet

StopObama2012: As the Imam is currently touring the Middle East on the taxpayer dime, asking you about the MidEast & Hamas is relevant Tweet

Did I lie? Either you condemn terrorism,  you don’t care, or support it. A “Moderate Muslim” would condemn it. And the Imam is indeed on a taxpayer funded tour courtesy of the State Department.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsXTbiINWSU

Roughly 2 hours later I recieved a reply

Park51: The State Dept thinks Imam Feisal is ok to speak on US issues. He’s an ambassador, it’s not his place to play politics. Tweet

I found this laughable and quickly took it apart.

StopObama2012: Does not an Ambassador play politics? Tweet

StopObama2012: And yet he has made political statements, like blaming the USA for 9/11 Tweet

Here’s the story.

“I wouldn’t say that the United States deserved what happened, but the United States policies were an accessory to the crime that happened”

That’s well beyond criticism to me, and factually inaccurate.

The Response

Park51: Well Kissinger did. But I don’t think that’s the role of inter-country outreach. Tweet

StopObama2012: Oh and refusing to condemn Hamas as a terrorist organization, just like you Tweet

Because that also, is a political statement, or non-statement if you will.

StopObama2012: An Ambassador is a political position, your dancing in circles

Park51: I don’t think he blamed the USA, but he may have questioned historical policy decisions tweet

You saw the above video, you tell me. Ahh and then they get testy.

Park51: What is your point? We pick a moderate and he has to pass your grain of sand test? How fair is that? Who would you nominate? tweet

Lets see, he wants to see America more Sharia compliant, won’t condemn terrorist organizations, and hold’s American policies responsible for 9/11. Doesn’t sound very moderate to me.

StopObama2012: Ahh spin. The point is that neither he, nor you are moderate, or you would have sought a different location in the first place tweet

StopObama2012: And you would also condemn all terrorist organizations and acts of terrorism carried out in the name of Islam tweet

Ohh your really going to love the answer

Park51: So in your mind, it our place to issue blanket condemnations of any group you deem unworthy? #thatsfair Tweet

I was under the impression that not just I, but the State Department as well, had condemned them as a Terrorist Organization

Why yes, here they are in a State Department Report:

From December 27, 2008, through January 17, 2009, the IDF conducted a major military operation in Gaza.  Israel and Hamas, a State Department-designated foreign terrorist organization that violently seized power in Gaza in June 2007, declared separate truces to end the fighting.  Occasional small clashes continue to occur along the border.

How about that. Guess I just didn’t pick and choose, huh.

StopObama2012: Are terrorist Organizations worthy?? Hamas, Hezboallah? Are they worthy? Al-Shabab? Need more? tweet

StopObama2012: See, here’s your trap, you say you are a moderate in the religion of peace, yes? Yet you refuse to condemn those that act with violence in it’s name Tweet

There has yet to be a response. If I recieve one I will update this post. Suffice to say The organization behind the Ground Zero Mosque is not “Moderate.”

While not openly “Radical” They clearly will not take a stand against, or condemn radical behavoir. It really is a simple question. If you ask me if I condemn the KKK I would reply, “Hell Yea”, “Of course”, and “Everyday and twice on Sunday.” Yet they refuse to condemn known terrorist organizations.

There are many questions left unanswered by this organization, such as how can a man, that was a waiter in 2002, get 4.8 million dollars cash to pay for it in 2006?


Video Link

More on the background of the Imam from PJTV:

And from Hannity

I call for an investigation into this Mosque’s Imam and the organization, most importantly, follow the money. Something is being hidden and need’s to be brought to light.

Meet Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour, an Obama Backer

In this interview, Percy Sutton ( One time attorney for Malcom X) reveals that, at the request of Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour, he wrote a letter of support to get Obama into Harvard as President of the Law Review.

So now we must ask, who is this Dr. Khalid Mansour that pulled these strings for Obama. Lets take a look. From Discover the Networks:

Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour is a Muslim lawyer and a black nationalist who made news in 2008 when it was revealed that he had been a patron of Barack Obama and had recommended the latter for admission to Harvard Law School in 1988.

Before becoming a Muslim, al-Mansour in the 1960s was named Don Warden. He was deeply involved in San Francisco Bay Area racial politics as founder of a group called the African American Association. A close personal adviser to Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, al-Mansour helped the pair establish the Black Panther Party but later broke with them when they entered coalitions with white radical groups.

In the mid-1970s al-Mansour met Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Tatal, who today is best known for having offered a $10 million donation toward 9/11 relief efforts in 2001 — an offer that was rejected by New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani when the prince suggested that the terrorist attacks were an indication that America “should re-examine its policies in the Middle East and adopt a more balanced stand toward the Palestinian cause.” Al-Mansour’s relationship with the prince eventually led to al-Mansour’s hiring as attorney to King Saud. He has since been an adviser to Saudi billionaires who fund the spread of Wahhabi extremism in America.

Al-Mansour is an outspoken hater of the United States, Israel, and white people generally. In recent years he has accused the U.S. of plotting a “genocide” designed “to remove 15 million black people, considered disposable, of no relevance, value or benefit to the American society.” He has told fellow blacks that “whatever you do to [white people], they deserve it, God wants you to do it and that’s when you cut out the nose, cut out the ears, take flesh out of their body, don’t worry because God wants you to do it.” Alleging further that Palestinians in Israel “are being brutalized like savages,” he accuses the Jews of “stealing the land the same way the Christians stole the land from the Indians in America.”

And from the Discover the Networks Page on Obama:

Harvard Law School and Khalid al-Mansour:

In 1988 Obama applied for admission to Harvard Law School. At the time, a Muslim attorney and black nationalist named Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour asked civil rights activist Percy Sutton to send a letter of recommendation to his (Sutton’s) friends at Harvard on Obama’s behalf.

Al-Mansour formerly had been a close personal adviser to Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, having helped them establish the Black Panther Party in the 1960s. He thereafter became an advisor to a number of Saudi billionaires known for funding the spread of Wahhabi extremism in America. Al-Mansour also showed himself to be a passionate hater of the United States, Israel, and white people generally.

With al-Mansour’s help, Obama in 1988 was accepted by Harvard Law School, where he became president of the Harvard Law Review. He graduated magna cum laude in 1991.

Newsmax conducted an interview with Khalid al-Mansour after the Percy Sutton revelation and here is their article:

Who is Khalid al-Mansour?

By: Kenneth R. Timmerman Who is the “mystery man” former Manhattan Borough Chairman Percy Sutton named as having aided Barack Obama financially at Harvard Law School?

Signs of al-Mansour’s work exists in Malaysia, Brazil, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and spans four decades in the United States, Newsmax discovered while scouring hundreds of sources for the story it reported on the revelations Wednesday.

His life story could have been written as a Horatio Alger-style rise from rags to riches. He sees himself as something of the “return of Antar,” a mythical black poet-warrior of pre-Islamic times. His real-life exploits range from a surprise one-on-one meeting with the prime minister of India as a college student to mentoring Black Panthers’ founders Huey Newton and Bobby Seale in the early 1960s.

Saga Starts With Meeting Saudi King

Al-Mansour’s rise to fame and fortune began with an introduction to the Saudi king in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 1977.

“I was asked by a Saudi friend – he was a student down in Newport (Calif.) –to go home with him to Riyadh,” al-Mansour told Newsmax.

His friend was a member of the royal family and planned to ask the king for money to help with his studies in the United States. But the king was in no mood to be generous.

“He was mad. And then my friend told me that the basis of his anger was that OPEC was being sued,” al-Mansour said. “This was a very nasty conspiracy that involved some of the biggest respected political names in America. The king didn’t know all of that, but he knew he wasn’t happy.”

Al-Mansour’s friend told the kin he was a lawyer. “The King didn’t know if I was a good lawyer or bad lawyer, but said, ‘Will you do it?’ I said, ‘I’d have to study it.’ He said, ‘Just take it, and get out!’”

The king required that only one lawyer represent the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. “So you win or you lose, based on the outcome because no one’s going to listen to any excuses. You’re either a loser for life, or a winner for life,” al-Mansour said.

Al-Mansour was a winner – big time.

Changed Name After Studying Islam

Born the 11th of 12 children as Donald Warden to a polyglot father who often spoke glowingly about Islam, al-Mansour decided to change his name in 1964 after learning Arabic and studying Islam.

“I found that Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour, if you put ’em together, it means that, if I’m eternally the slave of God, and I follow the right path, I will always be victorious. I liked that. So that became my name.”

He met and befriended Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the world’s 19-thealthiest person, when the prince was studying at Menlo College in California in the late 1970s. Al-Mansour’s law partner was representing the prince in a court case in California.

After getting a degree in business administration from Menlo in 1979, Prince Alwaleed went back to Saudi Arabia determined to become extremely successful, al-Mansur recalled.

The two began to work together, and the prince asked him to help him invest in Africa. “He said, let’s make our focus turning Africa around. He has never told me until today where this idea came from, but it became an obsession.”

Al-Mansour says he and the prince flew from country to country as he introduced the prince to heads of state. “It was easy for me, because I knew all the presidents.”

Mum on Relations with Obama

Al-Mansour deflected several attempts to get him to answer direct questions about his relationship with Obama and the Percy Sutton revelations it reported Wednesday.

“In respect to Mr. Obama, I have told him, because so many people are running after him, and when stories get printed they usually get distorted and then he has to spend a lot of time trying to unravel them – and then after the experience of Rev. (Jeremiah) Wright whom I’ve never met, but I’ve followed the media coverage – I was determined that I was never going to be in that situation. I never discuss Barack Obama,” al-Mansour said.

“I wish him the best, and hope he can win the election, and if he wins the election, that he adopts this campaign for education,” he said.

Al-Mansour wants Obama to launch an education and program” for black and Hispanic students, using his rock-star popularity to motivate young people, parents, and teachers to improve achievement standards.

Percy Sutton Revelations

Al-Mansour said is is aware of Percy Sutton’s revelations that identified him as raising money for Obama’s law school education when the presidential candidate was 25.

“But I’ve never confirmed it,” he said. “What you have since I’ve been out of the country is bloggers saying this is the new Rev. Wright — in drag! and he is a nationalist, racist, and worse than Rev. Wright. I’m not getting into that. Any statement that I make would only further the activity which is not in the interest of Barack, not in the interest of Percy, not in the interest of anyone. For the bloggers to not even have the courtesy to call me to ask what’s happening is a clear sign to me. There’s no need. There’s no benefit. So why do it?”

Asked specifically whether he had “spotted” Barack Obama while he was an undergraduate at Columbia as a promising student he wanted to help get into Harvard Law School, al-Mansour pleaded a faulty memory.

“I give a lot of speeches on college campuses, in the US and abroad. So I meet people all the time…. But I can’t say that I remember that.”

Nor would he confirm or deny that he had called Sutton, as Sutton reveals, asking him to help Obama get into Harvard.

“I’m not going to say that,” al-Mansour said. “That lends itself regardless of the answer and regardless of the truth to the type of sensationalism that I don’t consider productive to the goals that I have. I don’t see how this will promote education. I don’t see how this will promote a global respect. I don’t see how it deals with the basic issues we’re faced with in the country. I try to limit my comments to those kinds of issues, to avoid the tendency of the press to sensationalize both positive and negative.”

His attempts to deflect his support of Obama were pretty weak. Here he is practically campaigning for Obama:

Now for more on his radical views:

Here he is in an interview discussing one of his books and “Black Leadership”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HnRC25NXw8&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKmeSSbHMoQ&feature=related

Here is a multi part lecture titled: What Your Traditional Leaders Will Never Tell You

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

Part 7

Part 8

Part 9, Part 10

Part 11, Part 12

Part 13, Part 14

Part 15, Part 16, Part 17

I know theres alot there, Yes I watched all of it. Suffice to say, Dr. Mansour is just a Muslim version of Reverend Wright. While Wright  uses Black Liberation Theology with a Christian-ish face, Dr. Mansour basically does the same with an Islamic face. He has some very radical beliefs on Christianity and on Jewish people.

This lecture is titled: The Birth & Death of Christianity

This could be called the short version of the above

And heres a couple of his book titles taken from BarnesAndNoble.com and Amazon.com

The Lost Books of Africa Rediscovered: We Charge Genocide by Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq Al-Mansour

The Reflections of an African Arabian in American Captivity by Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq Al-Mansour

Dr. Khalid Abdullah Tariq al-Mansour is just another radical skeleton that helped get Obama to where he is today. Without Dr. Mansour, Obama would not have gotten to Harvard Law. You can see the similarities of belief between Dr. Mansour, Obama, & Wright. Not the core religion, but the Black Liberation Theology. Obama was a Muslim in his childhood, and in his book stated politically he would stand with them, but I do not believe he himself is a Muslim now, but a Muslim sympathizer. Obama fully embraces Wright’s distorted version of Christianity and has made speeches confirming this. But hearing much of the rhetoric of Dr. Mansour, I can see how they could become close friends.

Social Media Prevents Drawings, but not Terrorist Recruitment

Numerous videos on youtube recruit new terrorists to the Jihad.  At the same time, Facebook is busy censoring its members from drawing pictures of a Muslim religious figure.  How do they compare?

Youtube.com has numerous videos that aide the Jihadi’s effort to recruit, plan, and attack.

Hakeemullah Mehsud is Alive and Healthy and Delivering news about Attacks on USA

Operation Rah-e-Nijat and the Actual Facts by Hakeemullah Mehsud (Ameer Taliban Pakistan) Part-1 3/3

Sure, that’s fine, but drawing Mohammed?  Yeah, that’s offensive.


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