Tag Archives: Martin Luther King

Martin Luther King’s Dream in the 21st Century

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Martin Luther King had the courage to stand up for what he believed in- the idea that regardless of a man’s skin color, he should be treated equally. He should be judged on his character not his skin tone. It is appalling that in 1963 he should have to make such a statement. Just as it is appalling that in 2012 it is justifiable to call a conservative a terrorist merely because they are conservative.

I have a dream that I and those who believe as I do will not be called names, that our beliefs will not be the subject of fear mongering and vicious slander merely because of their position on the political spectrum. I have a dream that one day, I will be judged on the content of my character, the courage of my convictions and the merits of my beliefs, not a party affiliation.

I have a dream that one day reason will overcome prejudice. That some day a person will look at me and say, “I disagree with your opinion, but I respect your right to express it because I have the same right. And I will debate the merits of your ideas, not attack your character.”

That debate will be arbitrated by the pursuit of truth through ideas, not by the double-speak and half-truths of dishonest politicians seeking support.

That one day the desire to do the right thing, purely because it is the right thing, will be the motivator of public policy, not the desire for power. That men whose ideologies are different can overcome their differences when they agree and work together because it is the right thing to do.

That people idolize the merits of men-  a desire to serve truth,  a commitment to honesty, a dedication to equal justice for all, that they have integrity in all their actions. That they can look at someone they disagree with and say “At least he is living by the principles he believes in” and respect that.

That one day those whose actions are driven by a lust for power, and who believe the ends justified the means will be universally despised, because these actions show no respect for the rights of others.

That change for the sake of change becomes suspicious because there is personal motive behind it. That change be based on objective, rational analysis and a genuine desire to improve.

I dream that we can meet on the battlefield of ideas, where the primary objective is to seek out and serve truth. Where the desire to avoid uncomfortable thought does not trump the pursuit of the truth. Where the fallacies of a man’s argument are willingly surrendered to right.

I dream that one day the motto of all men will be to question with boldness because the truth has no agenda.

Most of all, I have a dream that one day the following statement will be the governing principle in the minds of men when their ideas conflict-

When I disagree with a rational man, I let reality be our final arbiter; if I am right, he will learn; if I am wrong, I will. One of us will win but both of us will profit.-Ayn Rand

This is Martin Luther King’s dream in the 21st century. It is now universally appalling to judge a man because of his skin color. Let’s hope that someday very soon, the same thing can be said for ideologies- that men will be judged on the content and character of their ideas, not becaues they can apply an ideological label to themselves.

Remembering Dr. King's Struggle Against Gun Control

Today is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Like every year, there will be discussion of his life and achievements. I wish to tell a different story: the story of his struggle against racist gun control laws.

Dr. King, who was a registered Republican, kept guns at home for self-defense. He applied for a permit to carry a handgun, but was denied by authorities in Alabama. Like most states at the time, Alabama had a “may-issue” carry permit system, which allowed authorities to deny a permit for any articulable reason. These gun control laws, in the South, constituted the first Jim Crow laws. As Justice Clarence Thomas noted in the U.S. Supreme Court’s Heller decision, the original intent of the 14th Amendment, passed during Reconstruction, was to guarantee First and Second Amendment rights- and the natural right of self-defense- to newly-freed black people. I noted the irony of Herman Cain, a black man who lived during Segregation, making a “states’ rights” argument about gun control antithetical to this cause.

There is another gun control issue which must be raised, in relation to Dr. King. In order to understand it, one must understand the extraordinary lengths black people had to go to in order to acquire firearms in that time period. Few dealers were willing to sell firearms to blacks; among those few were pawnbrokers, who also commonly sold firearms in that time period. Since much of their clientele was black (pawning was generally the only source of credit for blacks back then), pawnbrokers were more amenable to selling guns to them.

For black families who didn’t have access to an agreeable pawn shop dealer, the options for buying guns were very limited: Finding a sympathetic white person to act as a strawman to buy guns for them; pooling money with other families to travel to a gun store in a Northern state; or by mail order.

All of these activities were prohibited by the Gun Control Act of 1968. This act instituted an exceptionally restrictive licensing scheme for gun dealers- a scheme which required a special license to act both as a gun dealer and pawnbroker; it banned the interstate transfer of firearms except between licensed dealers; and it banned mail-order, out-of-state, and straw man purchases.

An historical point must be noted here: The assassination of Dr. King fueled the passage of the ’68 GCA. Let me state that again: Dr. King’s assassination was used as political ammunition to pass a gun control law intended to frustrate black people from buying guns for self-defense.

The history of gun control laws is a history of racism and bigotry. I note that in my home state of New York, the Sullivan Law- named for the megalomaniac mob-boss Timothy “Big Tim” Sullivan, the most corrupt of Tammany Hall Democrats- crafted a law in 1911 to prevent Italians, Jews, and Eastern European immigrants from getting a handgun license. The two years following the passage of the Sullivan Act were as bizarre as the law he crafted: He suffered from tertiary syphilis, was committed to an insane asylum, escaped, and died from being severed in half by a train.

Gun control advocates- mainly Democrats- generally ignore both the bigoted origins of gun control laws, and the bizarre personalities of politicians who endorse them. Let’s remember this today, when we celebrate Dr. King: A registered Republican, a gun owner, a champion of human rights, and a good and decent man who was denied the right to defend himself from a murderer.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream Morphs Into A Nightmare

 Revealing Dr. King’s Dream Part 2

 

“I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous, “I Have A Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963.

Nearly 50 years later, his words continue to reverberate through the halls of history. It would not take any stretch of the imagination to see how his words very would could be the most famous words spoken in modern American history.

Sadly, if the layers of current “reality” are peeled back, one could see that Dr. King’s words have been used and manipulated to do the exact opposite of what his dream was back then.

The question must be asked:

Has Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream turned into a nightmare for the very people he stood up for, and in fact, gave his very life for?

If one truly believes the words that Dr. King dreamed of, you have to look beyond the political manipulation that has allowed his dream to become a nightmare.

The funny thing about truth- it is or it is not. There is not middle ground. One must accept that something is or it is not, otherwise, you are left with nothing but hot air. Unfortunately, so much of what is spoken and written today and delivered as “facts”- the truth- is not truth at all.

The Dream has morphed into something that is not recognizable at this current time in history. It is no longer about the dream of a father, who longs for his children to live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but the content of their character.

We now live in a society where the norm is self above all else. This attitude is not contained to one race, creed, religion, gender or any other label, class or group of people we have been “divided” into by bureaucracy and political correctness.

To get to the truth- the real truth- one must get down to the very basics. Start at the very beginning, by asking themselves:

Do I- me, personally, desire to live in a nation where I- me, personally, will not be judged by the color of my skin, but the content of my character?

Once the answer to this question is determined, then, and only then, can one move beyond themselves, and ask the next vital question:

Do I- me, personally, desire to live in a nation where my children, my grandchildren, my parents, my siblings, and my friends, will not be judged by the color of their skin, but the content of their character?

Once the answer to this question is determined, then one can move on to the next step, and ask themselves:

Do I- me, personally, desire to live in a nation where every single individual that breathes air into their lungs, will not be judged by the color of their skin, but the content of their character?

Depending on how each individual person answers these three questions determines whether or not they truly believe in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream. If the answer- truthfully, without allowing the media, politicians, political correctness, agendas or any other outside influence to answer for the individual is yes to all three of the above questions, the final question one can truthfully say that yes, they truly believe in Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s dream.

If the answer to any of the previous three questions is no, then the individual cannot say they believe in the same dream as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Truth is truth. It cannot be spun for a political agenda. It is either truth, or it is not.

Do you personally believe in the same dream as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.?
Or do you allow outside influences to tell you what he “really intended” in his dream?

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Part 2 in an ongoing series

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Source:

DrMartinLutherKingJr.com

Why is There No Mention of ‘God’ in the Quotes at the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther Jr. King Memorial?

WASHINGTON, Oct. 16, 2011 — “God” does not appear in any of the quotes from Dr. King at his memorial in Washington, D.C. (For a list of all the quotes go to Wikipedia: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial.)

Failure to include the mention of God in the memorial is a shocking betrayal of the life, legacy and teachings of Dr. King who was an ordained Christian minister and pastor.

The question must be asked, “How is possible to have a memorial dedicated to Rev. King and not even mention the word ‘God’ once in any of his quotes?”

Failure to include the mention “God” in any of the Dr. King quotes demonstrates a troubling erosion of public expressions of faith and God in the public square.

Rev. Patrick J. Mahoney, Director of the Christian Defense Coalition in Washington, D.C., comments:

“Just a few days ago I walked to the Dr. King Memorial for a moment of inspiration, reflection and prayer. It was the first time I had visited the memorial.

“The setting and vision of the memorial was powerful and moving and served as a prophetic reminder that we must always stand for human rights and justice.

“As I walked around the memorial, I was stunned and shocked to see that the mention of ‘God’ was not included in any of the quotes from Dr. King on the granite wall surrounding his sculpture.

“Dr. King was an ordained Christian minister and pastor who made faith in God and the teachings of Christ the central part of his life and message. The heart of the civil rights movement was rooted in the church and drew its strength from the timeless truths proclaimed by God.

“Not to include any mention of ‘God’ in the quotes at the memorial is a betrayal of the life, legacy and teachings embraced and lived by Dr. King. I think he would have been stunned and disappointed to see this oversight.

“How is it possible to have a memorial dedicated to a Christian minister, who based his entire message on faith in God and the teachings of Christ and whose movement was founded in the church and not include even one mention of God?

“Simply stated, it is very troubling, dishonest, and should be corrected.”

Revealing Dr. King’s Dream

Nearly half a century ago, one of the most famous speeches in American history was delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in our nation’s capital.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a civil rights leader in a time where racial bigotry was a fact.

Many have tried to justify the facts, explain them away, make excuses for the hatred and violence committed against so many innocent lives, but the facts speak for themselves: racial injustice was real- and it was wrong.

Sadly, almost 50 years later, many say and believe that little progress has been made in realizing the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King.

Has The Dream gotten lost along the way, these past 50 years?

Where exactly did The Dream go wrong? Is it having an emotional breakdown? Is it hearing voices not its own? Is The Dream suicidal? Is there any hope left for The Dream?

The Dream has decided it just cannot go on this way any longer, and has decided to seek help. In this series of articles, we will attempt to help The Dream find the answers it is looking for. We will peel back the layers of it, to reveal the deepest, darkest, most breathtakingly beautiful, yet painful and haunting facts and emotions that are so tightly intertwined in history.

We will answer the above questions, and others along the way, as we revisit the years between 1963 and today, to see how much has or has not changed. We will separate cold, hard facts from raw emotions and enabling, destructive attitudes trapped in a virtual time warp of political rhetoric.

You are being given a very rare opportunity- an invitation to sit in on the therapy sessions of The Dream. This series of articles will attempt to break down Dr. King’s famous speech, shining the beautiful light of truth on the very heart and soul of his dream.

If you accept the invitation, be prepared to start the hard work. As is the case with any therapy, it will not be an easy journey. You will witness painful truths. You will have to decide if what you have been told all your life is indeed the facts, or if the facts have been twisted and manipulated to fit the needs of someone else.

There is much wisdom in the age old saying that “the truth will set you free.”

Will you accept the invitation to sit on on these sessions? If you do, you have a little bit of homework to do before our next session.

Please write down anything and everything you personally believe to be truth about race relations in America. Do you believe we, as a nation, have made progress in making Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream a reality?

Thank you for your interest in finding the real truth that is hidden in plain sight of The Dream.

I look forward to our next visit.

I Have A Dream
by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
August 28, 1963

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity.

But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God’s children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

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Part 1 in a series

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Source:

DrMartinLutherKingJr.com

Racism In America

August 28, 1963 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech to a massive crowd of two hundred thousand plus people. The crowd was made up of many different races of people, not just black, not just white. On that day, people gathered and united for a common good. Even though race relations could have exploded into violence and unrest many people of our nation united to solve a long standing problem.

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

These immortal words were a driving force behind actions taken to correct the injustices that were so prevalent in those days.

My question for you is this: have the words and dreams of Dr. King been twisted and perverted?

Rep. Allen West has been in the news a great deal. Rep. West has stated that he has been called such things as “Uncle Tom” and “sellout” for standing up for what he believes. Rep. West received numerous decorations in his military career before he retired in 2004, but it appears that his biggest battle might have just begun. Those on the left seem to have set their sights on Rep. West, especially fellow Floridian Rep. Wasserman-Schultz.

Recently I came across an article by Lloyd Marcus entitled “The Black Code”. Mr. Marcus answered some questions I have had for several years and even gave some new questions and thoughts to ponder. I understand that like people tend to group together whether it is on the basis of religion, culture or even race. What Mr. Marcus opened my eyes to is the existence of the “codes” that exist among many groups- be it blacks, whites, liberal or conservative to name a few. Some people live their lives by such a code while others don’t. Mr. Marcus described some of the repercussions of not adhering to the “Black Code”.

“Consequences for violating The Black Code are severe. I boldly proclaim myself to be an unhyphenated American rather than the politically correct term, “African-American”. It never occurred to me my statement would be seen as a violation of The Black Code.”

Mr. Marcus explained how the code played into the election of Obama when he ran for president.

“The emergence of Obama as America’s first black presidential candidate automatically activated The Black Code in the hearts and minds of most black Americans.

Obama’s socialistic ideas, anti-America associations and friends were irrelevant. Once again, I found myself odd man out with family and black friends.”

This is when I asked myself a couple of questions; isn’t it just as racist to vote for a person because of their skin color as it is to not to vote for them for their skin color? Doesn’t this kind of thinking contradict Dr. King’s teachings?

 “But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.”   – Dr. King

 

“Al Sharpton and the usual suspects along with their sycophant clueless puppy dog white liberal media exploit The Black Code at every opportunity.”-Lloyd Marcus

Over the years, people such as Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson have successfully manipulated many Americans for nothing more than their personal gain while others have used the “race card” to push their liberal agenda.

When Rep. Allen West sent his email to Rep. Wasserman-Schultz in response to her attack on him, the head of The National Black Caucus stated that he was “furious” with Rep. West. Where is this “Black Code”? Does Rep. West not qualify for inclusion in the loyalty the “code” dictates? Am I to understand that the “code” does not apply to black gentlemen (or ladies) that hold conservative values?

“Exploitation of The Black Code is the left’s strategy to defeat the tea party and get out the black vote in 2012. Their think tank went something like this:

“I got it!

Let’s call the tea party racist.

We’ll accuse them of opposing Obama’s race rather than his agenda to fundamentally transform America. Instinctively, blacks will flock to the polls in defense of their brother against those white tea party rednecks.”- Lloyd Marcus

The Tea Party racist? Was it not the Tea Party that was the driving force behind the election of Rep. West?

The left’s tactics push people of all races to look at candidates based on anything but their content of character.  They will play the “race card” at every chance and lie about candidates to distract the American people from what really matters. They do not want the U.S. Constitution to remain. They want to turn this great nation into their personal socialist playground.

I commend and admire people like Rep. West and Lloyd Marcus for standing up to the pressures of the politically correct in defense of our great nation. We should all hold people of their caliber as true patriots. We need more people like them no matter what color their skin is.

I hope that all that read this will read Mr. Marcus’ article also and above all else, do what Dr. King dreamed about, judge (especially your candidates) by the content of their character, not the color of their skin.

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For those of you that own firearms, train hard and well and teach those that do not know how.
Be good stewards of the right to bear arms, for we are the last line of defense against tyranny.
- Benjamin Wallace

 

Sources:

Lloyd Marcus article

Text of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech


Civil Rights Protests/Union Protests: Apples and Oranges!

I read an article today about a black man who marched for civil rights in the days of Martin Luther King. You know, back in the days when American citizens were not only protesting to get real workers’ rights, but also ‘fighting’ for their constitutional civil rights; back in the day when people were being killed simply for demanding that the government recognize their constitutional rights. This man’s name was Herbert. In this article Herbert compared the protesting in Wisconsin with the civil rights protesting of the sixties. In this story Herbert mentioned about how important it was for “the people” to “stick together.” (I ask, “Who are the people he is talking about?”) Then Herbert mentioned that “we need to become strong.” (Again I ask; “Who is the ‘we’ Herbert speaks of?”) Then Herbert mentioned that if “We don’t become strong we will lose our rights.” (Herbert, what do you mean if we don’t become strong? What do you mean if we don’t stick together?)

Well, I need to help Herbert get a little perspective. First of all I am saddened by how black people were treated in America for many years. I did not grow up in a prejudiced home, or a prejudiced society. The people I hung with as a teen-ager and young adult treated everyone the same. It still tears my heart out to know that there was a day when one race of Americans could hate another race of Americans simply because their skin was a different color. Those were issues that once split this nation in half. Well for the most part, those days are over. (Unfortunately prejudices of all types still exist in this world. You can’t fix stupid!) Black Americans today have the opportunity to walk the dream of Martin Luther King. The American dream is open to anyone who willing to work for it. The ultimate example of that is our own American President!

Herbert, the budget battle going on in Wisconsin these days is not between “we the people” and the Governor of Wisconsin. The protestors are not protesting against the ‘evils’ of Big Business. The protestors in Wisconsin are not protesting the right to vote, the right to work wherever they want, or the right to buy a home. They are protesting the ability to keep their union privileges. (Notice I said privileges not rights!) They are protesting to such a point that they would rather have these union privileges than help our state survive economically. Herbert, you were right about one thing in your story. People do need to stick together. In this situation the people of Wisconsin need to stick together in order to help their state. And the people in Wisconsin should also be sticking together as they work to remove the vermin who are striving to destroy this state. The budget crisis in Wisconsin is genuine. The only way “we the people” are going to solve this crisis is if we all stick together and do what is best for all the people of the state, not just public union people. The protesting in Wisconsin is not between abused, over-worked, underpaid minority workers and greedy corporate owners. The protesting in Wisconsin is not between poorly treated workers who want safer working conditions and better benefits and big business. The protesting in Wisconsin is not between the poor, oppressed working man and the filthy rich business owners. The vast majority of workers protesting in Wisconsin involves middle to upper class public union employees; citizens who already enjoy incredible union perks. Most of these ‘poor’ ‘woe-is-me’ protestors are union people with two to three cars in the driveway of their $200,000+ homes. The protesting that is going on in Wisconsin today is by people who want to do what is best for their wallets or for their unions before doing what is best for Wisconsin.

Herbert, I too am a union member; have been for thirty-five years. So even though I am a private union employee I need to let you know that I am not part of your “we the people” who must “stick together” to save our union privileges at any cost! I definitely believe I need to help this state because that will help everyone in the state and not just a few. I am simply a tax-paying Wisconsin union-member who is sick and tired of paying for both my benefits and someone else’s! I am a union member who cares more about helping all the people in this state, and the state itself. Herbert, contrary to what the big AFL-CIO tells you, if the state is not economically healthy, the businesses which provide jobs will not be healthy. And again, contrary to what the big AFL-CIO tells you, raising taxes to pay for higher and higher public union employees’ wages and benefits will not attract more businesses to our state.

It really saddens my heart when I read articles written by black people who foolishly compare the public union protesting (i.e., whining) that is going on in Wisconsin to the seriously denied civil rights protesters of the sixties. It is so disingenuous to see people like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton showing up to help highly-paid, luxuriously benefited public union workers. These men know what worthy, honorable protesting is all about. Jesse and Al are similar to old hippies who show up at protests hoping to re-kindle the days of old when they protested the Vietnam War. (These boys also like seeing their faces on the nightly news.)

Herbert, don’t bring shame on yourself by comparing what real suffering black workers had to endure in the sixties to what is going on amongst the well-paid, lavishly benefited public union employees of today! You lessen what black people did in the sixties if you continue to compare the legitimate protesting that the black people had to endure to get their civil rights enforced, to the whiny protesting of rich, spoiled public union workers.

SIDE NOTE: I constantly hear these public union people whining about being fed up. Fed up with what? Public union bus driver, what are you fed up about? You made over $100,000 last year! And union teacher Joan, what is your beef?  You work a few hours a day, nine months a year and you still make more money than what a vast majority of Americans make. Mr. and Mrs. Public Union Employee, you make more on your check and in benefits than most private union sector workers make. So again, what are you fed up about?

If you public union employees need something to be fed up about, be fed up with something genuine. If you want something to protest, protest something that benefits all Americans. Protest the high taxes that most Americans are paying! Protest how your taxes are being used for useless pork barrel projects. Protest the billions of dollars in ‘aid’ that we send to countries that don’t even like us. We could use that money to help our own people! If you want to unite people to a righteous cause, unite people to protest elected politicians who are ‘owned’ by unions; politicians who no longer do the bidding of the majority but instead are led by union thugs. If public union employees want to protest their ‘difficulties’ they have that constitutional right to do so—just so long as they do it legally. I say, these public union protestors should use all their energy and use their vast numbers to protest the illegal aliens who come into this country and steal jobs from Americans and receive a fortune worth of tax-payer funded ‘freebies’! There, go protest that!

Today there is another group out there who wants to try to control a free people. The very thing that was once wrong—terribly wrong—with this nation. There was a time when many in this nation once believed they were a better race of people. They believed they had the right to treat fellow citizens with contempt. These arrogant people believed they were above the law of the land. They actually believed they were the law. This race of people got too powerful. They saw nothing wrong with abusing the constitutional rights of others. They got so powerful they even tried to control the ability of a free people to think and act for themselves. Many unions and union people today have become that prejudiced, unlawful people. Many of these unions have decided that they should be deciding what is best for all Americans–just as they decide what is best for their members.

So again Mr. Herbert, I encourage you – do not cheapen the difficult, sincere civil rights protests of the sixties by comparing them with the selfish, whiny worker protests that are going on in Wisconsin.