Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin

Vital Roles In Production Of The F-35

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Lockheed Martin has started a video series highlighting suppliers to the F-35 and their vital role in production, as well as how the Joint Strike Fighter program has benefited the company and supported jobs.

“…working on the F-35 has helped Heroux-Devtek become a leader in aerospace technology and manufacturing.”

“GasTOPS president and CEO David Muir speaks about the impact of the F-35 program for the future of the company and Canadian industry.”

Lockheed Martin Completes Critical Milestone to upgrade the Navy’s Electronic Warfare Defenses

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lockheed_martin_logoSYRACUSE, N.Y., Jan. 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] recently completed a milestone test on the U.S. Navy’s evolutionary Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 system. This test further validated the system’s ability to protect the Navy’s fleet from evolving anti-ship missile threats.

Under SEWIP Block 2, Lockheed Martin will upgrade the AN/SLQ-32(V)2 system found on all U.S. aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and other warships with key capabilities to determine if adversaries are using electronic sensors to track the ship.

Block 2 obtained a Milestone C decision in January 2013, after which the system began 11 months of land-based testing in preparation for installation on a Navy warship. This test, which successfully completed earlier this month, demonstrated the maturity of the open architecture electronic warfare system by performing full system operation in multiple scenarios.

“We are very proud of the effort the SEWIP team has put into achieving these successes,” said Joseph Ottaviano, director of surface electronic warfare at Lockheed Martin’s Mission Systems and Training division. “Milestone C is a critical step towards delivering these next generation systems to the Fleet, and we are extremely pleased with the progress and results.”

Block 2 is the latest in an evolutionary succession of improvement “blocks” the Navy is pursuing for its shipboard electronic warfare system, which will incrementally add new technologies and functional capabilities. The Navy competitively awarded Lockheed Martin a contract in 2009 to develop SEWIP Block 2 to upgrade the passive detection capabilities of the current SLQ-32 systems. The company recently completed shore-based testing in preparation for ship installation.

Work on the SEWIP program is performed at the company’s Syracuse, N.Y. facility, which houses a new electronic warfare system test facility that simulates the complex environment submarines, surface ships and aircraft could operate in. By performing testing prior to delivery, the company is able to reduce risk and lower costs for the SEWIP program.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs about 116,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products, and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2012 were $47.2 billion.

Iran Actually Hacked America's RQ-170 Spy Drone

This is looking bad, folks.  Reports initially said that Iran had shot down one of  America’s RQ-170 spy drones (the type of drone that was used to provide real-time data during the Osama Bin Laden raid).  And to be honest with you, that’s what we wish would have happened.  Instead, it looks like Iran actually hacked the drone and commanded it to land on one of their air strips.  Here’s video of the drone (that is clearly NOT shot down and damaged).

Below is an excerpt from BBC.co.uk

US officials have acknowledged the loss of the unmanned plane, saying it had malfunctioned.

However, Iranian officials say its forces electronically hijacked the drone and steered it to the ground.

BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner says the intact condition of the Sentinel tends to support their claim.

Iran’s Press TV said that the Iranian army’s “electronic warfare unit” brought down the drone on 4 December as it was flying over the city of Kashmar, about 140 miles (225km) from the Afghan border.

So, this is bad no matter how you slice it.  One has to wonder, however, did Iran gain the capability to bring down one of the most sophisticated pieces of technology in the world.  You would almost think they had help…..