Tag Archives: Lincoln

Spielberg’s Lincoln Isn’t Pro-Obama

As most people, I went and saw Lincoln.  I’m no fan of biopics, but this one was rather good. In fact, it was excellent.  Daniel Day-Lewis will probably win another Academy Award for Best Actor, and it was not a pro-Obama film.  Many conservatives feared that the movie would be allegorical about the 44th president.  Steven Spielberg, Tony Kushner, and Doris Kearns Goodwin are liberal, but the film focused on how the 16th president delicately maneuvered to have slavery abolished in this country.  There is nothing liberal, or conservative, about this point in history.  I hope both sides would agree that slavery is unjust.

When Lincoln is told that the 13th Amendment was two votes shy of the 2/3 majority needed, he reminded the congressman, and some members of his cabinet, that those votes must be ascertained.  When questioned how to do that Lincoln said, “I am the President of the United States, clothed with immense power, and I expect you to procure those votes.”  Some of my conservative friends say that it’s a pro-Obama scene. I disagree.

Lincoln was a war president – and war presidents wield extraordinary power.  This isn’t controversial. It’s fact.  Furthermore, this film was in production for over ten years.  Spielberg bought the rights to Goodwin’s book in 2001, which is long before Barack Obama was on the national stage.

What should be noted is that the film shows how Lincoln was uncompromising on his position about slavery and its abolition.  He employed political operatives who used unscrupulous methods to secure votes for the amendment’s passage in the House.  Furthermore, it showed the political genius of Lincoln.  He carefully maneuvered through the dynamics of the 13th Amendment and the planning of the Hampton Roads Conference – which was a failed attempt to end the war in February of 1865.  The Confederate delegation insisted on their independence, and no deal was made.

However, Lincoln knew that if such news would break, the amendment would be finished.  Why pass such a poisonous amendment that everyone knew would be a deal breaker with the Confederacy?  Nevertheless, Lincoln’s considerable political acumen prevented disaster, and slavery was outlawed.

As I mentioned before, the film shows how compromise isn’t always the best option.  Furthermore, in politics, you’re going to have to get down into the gutter to get things done.  Barack Obama is always talking about compromise, or gives off the veneer that he’s willing to do so, but fails miserably at achieving his goals. He’s a loser.  Whereas, Lincoln saved the country, won the Civil War, and abolished slavery.  If liberal Hollywood wanted to make this film as a comparison to Obama, then they should have picked someone else.

Second, Obama would’ve hated the tactics Lincoln used to pass the amendment.  Third, Goodwin’s book was called Team of Rivals.  Lincoln had one of his political rivals in his cabinet, Edwin Stanton, to serve as Secretary of War, which was, and remains to be, a very powerful position since its reincarnation as Defense Secretary.

Do you think Obama would appoint a Republican to an equally powerful position under similar circumstances?  Lastly, Lincoln, as I’ve said before, accomplished his legislative goal.  The keyword is accomplished.

In the end, Lincoln is our greatest president.  Not only because he abolished slavery – but he also began the process that developed into the national identity we hold today.  After 1865, Americans began viewing themselves as Americans.  Prior to 1865, an intense regionalism was ingrained into our socioeconomic fabric where states were viewed as separate countries.  As such, without the evolution of such a uniting force, Americans wouldn’t have come together as strongly as we did during the Spanish-American War, World War II, or on 9/11.  Barack Obama is never, and will never, set forth a new identity like the one Lincoln managed to construct after winning the Civil War.  He simply can’t since he’s not American.  He is a citizen by birth, but concerning understanding the social dynamics and traditions of America – he’s as hopeless as Jefferson Davis.

Originally posted on The Young Cons.

The Sun Sets on the Lincoln Town Car. What Will the Dawn Bring?

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 29, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — For the luxury transportation industry, the discontinuation of the Lincoln Town Car marks the end of an era. Since the 1990s, the Lincoln Town Car has been the flagship of limousine companies’ fleets. In 2010, however, Lincoln announced they would cease production of the Town Car series, leaving the luxury transportation industry high and dry without a clear successor. Right now, KLS Transportation Services, Inc., a prestigious Los Angeles limousine service, is looking at the same landscape as their competitors and wondering what model will take the Town Car’s place as the market leader.

At the 2011 LCT Show in Vegas and the LimoDigest Show in Atlantic City, no vehicle stood out as an obvious replacement for the Lincoln Town Car. Lincoln was pushing its MKT and MKZ models, but top-tier limousine companies like KLS aren’t sold yet. The future success of these models in the luxury transportation industry will really depend on word-of-mouth from clients. If customers don’t respond favorably to Lincoln’s newest entries, limousine companies will look somewhere else. At the same time, Hyundai has made the Genesis its standard-bearer, and Toyota was presenting the Camry for consideration. Both of these brands, however, will face resistance, because neither is widely considered a “luxury class” automobile.  More likely contenders include the Benz E-Class and S-Class, or the BMW 5-series.

According to the experts at KLS, market forces are probably going to sort this out on their own over the next few years. If the existing field of vehicles doesn’t impress customers, auto manufacturers like Lincoln or Cadillac will likely respond by introducing a new sedan (hopefully by 2013). After all, the transportation industry represents roughly $7 billion in annual revenue worldwide, and that is not a market share that the auto industry can afford to ignore for long.

Turn Away from Ungratefulness Toward Prosperity

An ungrateful heart leads to bitterness and failure. Our Founding Fathers understood this.  They also understood that America and the hope she offers were no accident.  They believed that Divine Providence was responsible for the formation of a country where freedom and individual responsibility were valued and rewarded above all else.  In the very first Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamation, President George Washington declared Americans must give thanks “That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks – for his kind care and protection of the People of this country” and also “that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions”

In his Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1863, the first of a now unbroken string of Presidential Proclamations, Abraham Lincoln said: “And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners, or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged.”

Both of these great men understood the importance of a grateful heart.  It is gratefulness that allows us to acknowledge the blessings around us.  It is gratefulness that encourages us to stop for a moment and take account of the grace and blessings that have been bestowed upon us by our Almighty Creator.  It is gratefulness that prevents our hearts from turning to stone and rendering us incapable of compassion and progress.  Our ancestors felt so strongly about this that they saw fit to declare a national day of thanks, when we as citizens would join in one voice and sentiment to express gratefulness. However, these great men did not believe giving thanks as a nation was enough in and of itself. They felt  along with thanksgiving should come repentance.  Both Lincoln and Washington recognized that thanksgiving without self-examination was useless.  They called for national repentance as well. For those of you who don’t quite understand what repentance is, Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines it as “repent” as “to turn from sin and dedicate oneself to the amendment of one’s life; to feel regret or contrition; to change one’s mind”.  Lincoln and Washington had both just led the nation through revolutionary and civil war.  They understood the importance of being grateful for the fine nation that resulted in both wars, but they also knew that much pain had been wrought upon the American people throughout.  They knew that in order to move forward not only did Americans need to thank, they also needed to forgive.

As we approach another Thanksgiving in this great country I wonder if we have forgotten how to be thankful as a nation.  Our cities are currently being overrun by the most ungrateful of citizens.  Unlike the tea party protests, Occupiers across the nation have not publicly declared one second of gratefulness or appreciation for all America has offered and continues to offer by way of comfort and security.  Their ungratefulness has exposed the hardest of hearts among these protesters. We have seen violent deaths, sexual assaults, batteries, cursing, yelling, vandalism, throwing of bodily fluids and a complete disregard for the welfare of average, working Americans and their property.  We have managed to raise an entire generation of ungrateful children and our nation is paying dearly for that.  Our children are throwing a temper tantrum.  Their ungrateful hearts (and many of ours) have turned to stone and the rest of us are witnessing the results, not only in their protests, but in the economy and general welfare of the country.  Perhaps its time to step back on this most uniquely American holiday and reflect on our hearts.  We have our troubles but we sill have so much to be thankful for when we look at the rest of the world.   We are free, and despite our many problems that is a special gift.  But we cannot end there.  Alongside our thankfulness this season let us remember the divisions that have always plagued us, and let us repent.  Let us recognize that we are all sinners; we have all hurt someone at some point.  We have wandered from our founding principles and God-given mandates.  We have come to believe we deserve all of our blessings.  We must turn away from that sense of entitlement, recognize it for the sin that it is, and move forward with grateful hearts.

I am no fool.  I know that there are many (far too many) Americans who see nothing wrong with wanting more while giving nothing.  There are many reading this right now who scoff at the idea that they need to apologize or ask forgiveness for anything.  But for those of us who see value in the idea of thankful repentance, our Founding Fathers saw fit to establish a national day of Thanksgiving.  They saw fit to give us the choice to be heard as a nation, to stand together, if only for one day.  Lets not waste that day and what it represents.  This Thanksgiving lets make the choice, as a nation, to turn  and say thank you; turn to our neighbors and say forgive me; turn to our God and say we repent – we turn away from ungratefulness of the past and toward the bounty of a thankful America.