Tag Archives: Jon Huntsman

Jon Huntsman Drops Out; Ain't A Dang Thing Changed

In case you haven’t heard, former governor of Utah, Jon Huntsman Jr. has officially dropped out of the Republican primary.  That’s not surprising, really, considering that he spent most of the past year in the single digits.  What is surprising is that he didn’t bow out on the night of the New Hampshire primary; the guy practically lived there, and he still came in behind Ron Paul.

The other thing that is surprising (and particularly #HeadDesk worthy) is that Huntsman thinks his dropping out will consolidate the vote.  That couldn’t be any further from the truth.

Huntsman dropping out does very little, if anything, to affect the dynamics of this race.  Right now you have three factions: Romney, Paul, and then this gaggle involving Perry, Gingrich, and Santorum.  And the truth is that as long as Paul is in the race, there will probably never be anyone with enough momentum to overcome Romney.  Even if you have Santorum and Perry drop out, there is a very real chance that Paul staying in can help Romney get the plurality every time.

So it’s cute that Huntsman wants his endorsement to carry weight, just like it’s cute that McCain wanted his to do so, but Jon dropping out did nothing to change this cluster-truck that we’re dealing with.  The only thing it did was to make the Huntsman girls seem a little less relevant.  But with today’s news culture, they can probably go to CNN and be three times more compelling as pundits than Meghan McCain has ever been. (click here and here to see some of what the Huntsman girls have become famous for)

Family Research Council Endorses Rick Santorum

Tony Perkins

CDNews had the privilege of being invited to the Family Research Council’s conference call on Saturday, where Tony Perkins, President of the FRC, announced that a group of 150 conservative leaders had chosen Rick Santorum as their Presidential candidate.

Among the highlights of the conference:

Mr. Perkins gave a synopsis of the meeting at Judge Paul Pressler’s ranch outside Houston, Texas. Surrogates of every candidate except Jon Huntsman spoke before the group. Mr. Perkins said the group’s three primary issues were, foremostly, the repeal of Obamacare; the debt ceiling issue; and the pro-life movement. Mr. Perkins said the group focused on determining the candidate who best reflected the conservative mindset and was most likely to succeed in defeating Barack Obama. He said economic issues were extremely important to the group.

Mr. Perkins said the event was not an anti-Romney event, and very little time was spent discussing Romney’s record. He said there was no discussion of Romney’s religion, and that if it was discussed it was a sidenote.

Mr. Perkins said that the group of conservative leaders would manifest their support for Santorum through their PACs and other means. Mr. Perkins said the organization would not call on Rick Perry or any other candidate to drop out of the election. Mr. Perkins couldn’t name the leaders involved in the group’s ballot process, but he said some may soon emerge with endorsements for Santorum and he estimated that other activites supporting Santorum would emerge within about 24 hours.

Mr. Perkins said there was no discussion of eventually supporting Mitt Romney, and that the participants were not resigned to the belief that Romney would be the eventual nominee. He said there was some discussion about Romney’s abortion record, but that very little time was spent on the topic.

Mr. Perkins said Santorum’s record of stability and consistent articulation of economic and social issues appealed to the group, and that the group hoped to overcome Santorum’s fundraising deficit through public support.

Mr. Perkins said there had been some concerns about Rick Perry’s “stumbles” during the race. He said that he expected passionate support whether the nominee were Perry, Gingrich, or Santorum, but that the most passionate support was for defeating Obama.

He said there was not a fear that the group’s support for Santorum was coming “too late”, following Iowa and Hew Hampshire. He believed that the support was coming at a “good time” in the primary process.

Mr. Perkins said FRC would be releasing a wirtten statement soon regarding the event.

 

 

 

Out of luck in Virginia: Judge rules against Perry, Gingrich and Huntsman

A federal judge has dismissed Gov. Rick Perry’s legal action by which he had hoped to regain access to the Virginia primary ballot.

Former Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Gov. Huntsman had also joined on to Perry’s suit as they also had failed to gather enough signatures to make the ballot. Now it appears that only Mitt Romney and Ron Paul will be eligible for Virginia’s 49 delegate votes during that state’s open primary on “super Tuesday” March 6th.

Federal district judge John A. Gibney Jr. explained his ruling by saying that “In essence, they played the game, lost and then complained that the rules were unfair.”

The legal basis for the suit was not the reason Judge Gibney threw it out, instead the judge went on to say that “Had the plaintiffs filed a timely suit, the Court would likely have granted preliminary relief. They are likely to prevail on the constitutionality of the residency requirement, and, had they filed earlier, they would have been able to obtain the requisite 10,000 signatures”

The suit was originally filed as a challenge to Virginia’s strict registration requirements. Specifically, the legal action contends that the requirement that even those that gather the signatures be eligible voters in Virginia is overly restrictive and a violation of the first amendment protection of free speech.

New Hampshire results didn't change anything

Mitt Romney’s long-expected triumph in New Hampshire came to be and yet .. nothing changed.

New Hampshire is home to all of 12 total delegates in the GOP nomination fight where 1,144 are required to secure the republican spot which means having won the state doesn’t put Romney much closer to the end goal.

With no one changing anything in their election plans after New Hampshire, did it matter?

Conservatives are still searching for an alternative to Romney that will more closely line up with their principles which the Granite State was unable to define – being a mainly moderate-to-liberal area it should be no surprise.

South Carolina is the first primary in a Conservative state and will likely present Conservatives with the candidate that will be the anti-Romney – or if Romney runs away in the southern state, perhaps no alternative exists.

Look for Huntsman’s New Hampshire showing to fizzle in S.C., Paul and Perry will fight a place in the bottom half and Santorum/Gringrich will have another neck-and-neck battle, but this time for second. Romney will likely take South Carolina, but the question remains how decisive a win he manages.

 

Mitt takes New Hampshire; Paul, Huntsman trail

As soon as the polls closed, major outlets such as Fox News wasted no time in calling the election for former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney.

Holding 35%+ of the vote throughout the first hour of vote counting, Romney has undoubtedly taken the top spot while Ron Paul has shown well at just under 25% of the vote and Jon Huntsman holding steady around 16%.

The real race is for fourth place between Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum where the two have stayed within .2% of each other for most of the evening.

Having spent no resources or time in New Hampshire, Rick Perry has spent the entire evening with less than 1% of the total granite state vote in dead last.

January 7th 9pm ABC/Yahoo! News Republican Debate

Saturday at 9pm Easterm, ABC, Yahoo! News and WMUR teamed up to produce the first of two New Hampshire GOP debates this weekend.

Poll after the debate:

[poll id=”35″]

Participants: Jon Huntsman, Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Rick Perry, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum

Moderators: Diane Sawyer, George Stephanopoulos and local TV anchor Josh McElveen

Replay:

<as soon as available, but here’s some of it>
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ABC News 2 minute highlight:

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Can Rick Perry Still Win?

Tuesday night, Governor Rick Perry announced, after a disappointing showing in the Iowa caucuses, that he was returning to Texas to reevaluate his campaign. Wednesday morning, he tweeted that he was on his way to South Carolina.

The question of the moment for Perry supporters is this: Can Perry still win?

If the behavior of the Romney and Gingrich campaigns is any indication, he certainly can.

Pro-Romney PACs ran a littany of attack ads against Gingrich in Iowa, and it’s likely these ads are partially responsible for Newt’s poor performance there. Gingrich will likely retaliate in kind in New Hampshire and South Carolina.

This gives us the prospect of a mutually-assured-destruction scenario: Romney’s been successful at assailing Gingrich, and Gingrich’s ego demands he respond with an even harsher assault. Gingrich’s legendary ability to draw proverbial blood with his comments will force Romney to escalate in turn (remember, this is the same Romney who tried to physically intimidate Rick Perry [PIC], and often tells other candidates “It’s my turn now” in debates). I predict this escalation will go back-and-forth between Mitt and Newt for quite some time.

Attack ads from both camps could have two effects: 1) Souring primary voters with the negativity of both campaigns; 2) Souring voters on both of their records.

This leaves the door open for a candidate who can distance himself from the schoolyard fighting and, by comparison, ‘look Presidential’. Who could be that candidate?

I think it’s safe to say Jon Huntsman won’t be the nominee at this point. Michele Bachmann has dropped out. Rick Santorum, despite his win in Iowa, doesn’t appear to have the organization or fundraising to last beyond Iowa. And once the closed-primary states start voting, Ron Paul is finished.

By default, it would be Rick Perry.

In order to succeed, Perry needs to rework his campaign. As Erick Erickson pointed out in this post at RedState, Rick’s reboot must include removing the under-performing people in his staff who are handicapping him.

This also means Perry’s people need to be better at disseminating information to pro-Perry bloggers, who make up the backbone of his messaging. This ties in to fundraising, too: the more the Perry message is spread, the more money comes into the campaign. It’s a simple numbers game.

If Rick Perry is the candidate we believe him to be, we’ll soon see a big turnaround in his campaign.

Romney Takes Iowa by 8 Votes

Iowa GOP Caucus Vote Totals: (from CNN politics)

Romney – 30,015 Santorum – 30,007 R.Paul – 26,219 Gingrich – 16,251

Perry – 12,604 Bachmann – 6,073 Huntsman – 745

In the closest primary election in modern America history, Mitt Romney edged Rick Santorum by just 8 votes in Tuesday night’s Iowa GOP caucus vote. Santorum’s surprising surge to a second place finish is a testament to the tireless campaigning that took him to every corner of the state, especially considering that Santorum had only raised $700,000 for his campaign from July – September, a period that saw Mitt Romney raise over $17 million. Ron Paul’s third place showing has to be largely disappointing, considering the amount of money he spent in Iowa. (reported to be $344,00 in Iowa alone) The same could be said of Rick Perry, who plunked down $452,000 for a fifth place finish in Iowa and was last seen heading back to Texas to reassess his campaign.

All told, the GOP candidates spent $1.24 million on Iowa ads leading up to Christmas. Up next is the Jan. 10th New Hampshire primary where Romney is expected to have an easy win due to the fact that he is the former Governor of Massachusetts, which is right next door. Then the candidates will square off in South Carolina on Jan. 21st where the top slot is largely up for grabs in the latest polls, and will be sure to be a hotly contested battle. After South Carolina, the candidates will do battle in the very important swing state of Florida on Jan 31st.

Candidates statements following the Iowa caucus results announcement:

Michelle Bachmann vowed to fight on despite a poor 6th place showing in Iowa, stating, “I believe that I am that true conservative who can and who will defeat Barack Obama in 2012,” she told supporters at her Iowa campaign headquarters. “And over the next few days, just be prepared, the pundits and the press will again try to pick the nominee based on tonight’s results. But there are many more chapters to be written on the path to our party’s nomination and I prefer to let the people of the country decide who will represent us.” She is scheduled to be in South Carolina next without any reported plans of trying to do any serious campaigning in New Hampshire.

Rick Santorum thanked all of his Iowa supporters and finished with the statement, “By standing up and not compromising, by standing up and being bold and leading, leading with that burden and responsibility you have to be first, you have taken the first step to taking back this country,” Santorum’s fund-raising has surged right along with his Iowa support, which has given his campaign a new life, albeit a probably temporary one, as he isn’t expected to do well in N.H.

Rick Perry thanked his supporters and then stated that he was heading back to Texas to reassess his campaign, possibly signaling the end of the Perry campaign for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination.

Newt Gingrich congratulated Rick Santorum on running a great campaign while telling his supporters, “We survived the biggest onslaught in the history of the Iowa primary,” Gingrich said. “I admire how positive [Santorum] was,” the former Speaker added. “I wish I could say that about all the candidates.”
But despite the disappointing finish, Gingrich vowed to stay in the race told supporters and said a “new battle begins” after Iowa. The reported $4 to 5 million dollars in attack ads run by Ron Paul and Mitt Romney against Newt Gingrich in Iowa certainly took it’s toll on the former Speaker of the House.

Mitt Romney, who hadn’t done much campaigning in Iowa until the last few weeks, seemed unfazed by nearly being upset by Santorum in Iowa, stating that he had only had 5 staffers in Iowa this year, as compared to the 52 staffers he had there in his 2008 campaign. That statement would seem to portray that Iowa just isn’t really all that important as far as actually winning the GOP presidential nomination is concerned.( In Romney’s camp)

Ron Paul thanked his supporters for the “fantastic showing” they had at the caucus. (3rd place) He also highlighted some of his campaign platforms for the cheering crowd. “You’re doing this because you believe in something,” Paul said.

Jon Huntsman has also vowed to fight on, and seemed to make a subtle play for some of Rick Perry’s supporters as he stated upon hearing the Perry was reassessing his campaign, “Mary Kaye and I have a tremendous amount of respect and admiration for our friends Rick and Anita Perry. As he returns to Texas, where he implemented the kind of pro-growth policies that our country desperately needs and President Obama failed to deliver, we wish Rick and his family all the best.”

On to New Hampshire, which is located in the Northeastern United States, and consists of a very different type of voters than Iowa.

Come On, GOP!

Let’s pause for a moment and assess the GOP frontrunners:

It’s come to light this week that Ron Paul’s newsletter didn’t publish just one possibly racist article, it printed several definitely racist articles. From Mark Mayberry at The Truth About Bills:

The comments below seem to be the most notable:

• “Given the inefficiencies of what DC laughingly calls the criminal justice system, I think we can safely assume that 95 percent of the black males in that city are semi-criminal or entirely criminal.”
• “We are constantly told that it is evil to be afraid of black men, it is hardly irrational.”
• After the Los Angeles riots, one article in a newsletter claimed, “Order was only restored in L.A. when it came time for the blacks to pick up their welfare checks.”
• One referred to Martin Luther King Jr. as “the world-class philanderer who beat up his paramours” and who “seduced underage girls and boys.”

Ron Paul’s response to this revelation is, well, irrelevant. The statements were published, and they’re clearly racially-charged. That should be the last nail in the coffin of Paul’s campaign, but it probably won’t be.

Then there’s Newt Gingrich, whose history of government medicine, gun control, poor leadership, and unabashed admiration for FDR should disqualify him from consideration. Unfortunately, they haven’t.

 

Thomas Sowell’s “endorsement” of Gingrich this week is pretty standard fodder as far as Newt endorsements go. It can be summarized thus: ‘Newt isn’t a very good guy, but Obama is much worse… and yadda yadda Mitt Romney’. To me, common sense dictates that any candidate who must be endorsed with a disclaimer- such as “I know he’s not a nice guy…” shouldn’t be endorsed at all.

And the endorsements- just like Sowell’s- follow the same unspoken inevitability assumption: There is no candidate other than Newt (well, OK, there’s Mitt), Newt is the inevitable choice, suck it up and vote for him in the primary, and he’ll look good debating Obama. I see no enthusiasm amongst Gingrich supporters, merely acquiescence.

Speaking of Mitt: I think it’s safe to say few of us on the right really want to vote for him. The thrust of the Presidential race so far as been to find the un-Romney, after all. I don’t think I need to say much more than that about him.

Jon Huntsman, Michele Bachmann, and Rick Santorum are barely worth mentioning. Their poll numbers are so consistently low, they’re guaranteed to never earn the nomination.

And then there’s Rick Perry. It is maddening to me that more people aren’t getting behind him! Unlike Gingrich, he’s extremely personable, has no plans to socialize medicine, and has a clean gun rights record. He’s also the ideal ‘not-Romney’. He has an impeccable record of governance in Texas and a sensible immigration plan.

In fact, I don’t think anyone even disputes any of these points.

So what exactly is the barrier to getting behind Perry? If it’s the one dumb video referencing ‘gays in the military, let’s point something out: Although it wasn’t well-stated, the basic point of the ad was to illustrate that not all groups are gaining equality in the law. While one group- the gay community- are gaining legal equality, another group- Christians- are rapidly losing it. Compare this to Gingrich flatly telling the gay community to vote for Obama, and tell me who is less LGBT-friendly.

So again I ask: What is it about Perry- a solid small-government conservative with an impressive record as Governor of Texas (as well-illustrated by “Ace Of Spades” here)-  that makes him less appealling than Mitt Romney or Newt Gingrich or Ron Paul? Anyone?

Come on, GOP! Do we really want a poor candidate like Gingrich or Romney? Or do we want a great candidate with a proven track record of success?

The Basis Of Big Government?

Let me ask you, the reader, this question: What motivates a person to believe that a government which controls every aspect of your life, your business, your personal habits, and your body, is a good idea?
To answer the question, let me emphasize the word your. Your life, your business, your habits, your body. We all know that big-government proponents seek to exempt themselves from the same measures intended to restrict you and I.

The evidence of this is legion: Far-left celebrities who preserve their own wealth rather than redistribute it as they would yours; far-left politicians who evade taxes while insisting that you pay more; leftists who keep guns in their homes while seeking to ban you from having them.

This isn’t an attitude exclusive to the left, though. There are some on the right who also maintain this belief. Organizations like FreedomWorks are doing a good job ferreting them out.

So again I ask, why would someone adopt the belief that government should rule you? The answer is obvious: They believe themselves more qualified to make decisions for you than you are. To them, we’re simpletons, unable to make good decisions for ourselves. They see it as their divine obligation to protect us from ourselves.

When choosing a Presidential candidate, ask yourself this: Which of them is most likely to leave you alone? Which one will make government as inconsequential in your life as possible?

Or, which of them believes he’s “the smartest man in the room“?

Only One Candidate Can Name Their Favorite Supreme Court Justice (Sorta)

At last night’s debate, Megyn Kelly made what seemed like a simple request.  Name your favorite Supreme Court justice.  For some reason, only candidate (barely) was able to pull it off.

I mean, wouldn’t it have been awesome if each candidate just rattled off their favorite justice?  But, no.  They all had to get long-winded and then not even have the courage to just pick ONE justice.  Most of them hedged their bets with as many as THREE.

What do you think of candidates being so long-winded with what should be a “one word answer”?  And also, if you were on that stage what justice would you have chosen?  (and no, faithful readers, you are not limited to one word with your response)

Jon Huntsman's Daughters Spoof "Sexy Back" In An Attempt To Promote Their Dad


Yeah… I don’t even know what to say about this one.  After spoofing Mark Block (Herman Cain’s adviser) for his “smoking ad”, Jon Huntsman’s daughters have made another interesting song/video.

Informal poll…. Let us know if you’re even familiar with the song these girls are spoofing in the comments below.

[poll id=”34″]

November 22nd Republican Debate on National Defense [Full Video]

On Tuesday, November 22nd at 8pm EST, the Heritage Foundation, the American Enterprise Institute and CNN will present a GOP presidential candidate debate on national security and foreign policy. The twitter hashtag for the debate will be #CNNDebate

Moderators/Panel

To be announced.

Debate Prep

AEI scholars discussions

Who Will Be There

Complete Debate Video:

Jon Huntsman Still Thinks He Can Do Well In New Hampshire. What Do You Think?

Jon Huntsman has stated that he’s made over 100 appearances in New Hampshire, yet he’s still near the bottom of the polls. Piers Morgan pressed him on this earlier in the week, and this is how Huntsman replied.

I know Jon Huntsman is not a very popular figure on this website, but I think he handled this question really well. What do you think? Is he a good candidate that has been over looked by the Republican electorate? Or is he an idiot who should have never quit his day job (as ambassador to China)? What do you have to say?

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