Tag Archives: HPV

Abortions And Gardasil For 12 Year Old Girls

WARNING:  THIS POST MAY BE OFFENSIVE TO SOME AND MAY NOT BE SAFE FOR WORK

WARNING:  THIS POST MAY BE OFFENSIVE TO SOME AND MAY NOT BE SAFE FOR WORK

On Sunday, California Governor Jerry Brown announced that he had signed AB499 into law.  This bill is basically what’s known as the law that let’s young girls (as young as 12) decide to get preventative treatments against HPV (like Gardasil) without consulting their parents.  They can go wherever this service is being offered and get a $500 series of vaccinations without so much as telling their parents they’ve chosen to do so.  An interesting point that crosses my mind is that any parent who has a 12 year old daughter that can “disappear” long enough to get Gardasil administered to her without her parents noticing is probably the same parent that would have a sexually active 12 year old in the first place.  The monster feeds itself on this one.  (please note that this is conjecture on my part, and it’s somewhat tasteless conjecture at that)

While studying this story, I also came to a realization that is so shocking that I had to double check it and then check it five more times before I was willing to believe it.  In California, there is no parental involvement when it comes to getting abortions regardless of how young the girl is.  The same 12 year old girl that can get these HPV vaccinations can presumably get an abortion too.  Chew on that for a second.  Abortions can be performed on minors without the parents’ consent and without notifying the parents either.  That is astounding.

So, basically, a sixth grade girl can decide to get the HPV treatments, have sex with an adult for all we know, get pregnant, and have an abortion all without her parents ever finding out.  If you ever wanted to know why California is in such bad shape, I think this scenario would be a good place to start looking.  AGAIN, THIS PIECE IS STRICTLY MY OPINION AND POSSIBLY OFFENSIVE TO SOME.  But I don’t see how any good can come from the foundation this state has set in place.

Jamie Oliver doesn’t think kids in L.A. are smart enough to pick what flavor milk they can drink.  Why does anyone think they can decide on what is prudent with their health or their sexual organs?  Why are minors allowed to decide to have an abortion?  At this point, I don’t even consider myself a prude; I just don’t think any good can come from children having this much control without any way that parents can intervene.  And that’s the irony, don’t you think?  Who gets in trouble when children break the law?  Who does that onus usually fall on?  The parents, right?  How many shades of grey do there really need to be in California?  I have a child, and I live in California.  What will this state let my offspring do behind my back by the time they are “old enough to make these decisions”?  That is an anxiety that no parent should have to feel, but I feel it.

I know that proponents of these laws say it’s because if these laws weren’t in place, then parents would let dreams of sexual abstinence cloud the reality of teenage intercourse or some crap like that.  And you know what, there is some truth to that.  A little bit…  But this is California.  I think most parents are pretty well aware that their kids might start screwing at younger age than what is desirable.  I also think those parents (myself included) would like to think they have some say-so when or if that happens.  In California, we don’t.

And then there is the truly frightening paradox.  On one hand, my child is so fragile, that they “need” to stay on my insurance until they are 26 years old.  But on the other hand, they can kill a baby when they are 16 (or even younger).  Please explain how this social and legal schizophrenia sounds rational to anyone.  Maybe in 1956, it was common for fathers to scare their daughters so badly that they resorted to a back-alley abortion, but in 2011, I just don’t think it happens that often.

But you know what?  I’m a reasonable man.  How about a compromise?  If a minor decides she wants vaccines or an abortion, why not have an advocate of some sort present in police stations.  Some officers come to the home and explain that the minor is pregnant and/or sexually active and scared.  She’s scared that her parents will hurt her if they find out, so these advocates come and explain it to the parents, while creating a safe atmosphere.  Now maybe my idea for advocates is crap.  I haven’t put enough thought into it to fight you over it, but I think it’s a lot better letting a 12 year old see doctors or kill babies behind my back.  There has to be some sort of middle ground, even in Progressive California.

These are my thoughts, and this is my rant.  This is in no way an objective piece of analysis.  These are just my thoughts. (and there were two warnings at the start of the piece, in case you didn’t notice them)

With that said, I’ll leave you with this video I made which mocks the policies in California.  Like this post, the video may be offensive to some.

Gov. Perry – Welcome to Your Past

During my misspent youth, I was a Democrat. Consequently, when I started my political consulting firm I wanted to be true to my mistaken convictions, so I only worked for Democrat clients.
[Note: Now that I’m a Republican who has seen the error of my ways, I often find myself trying to rationalize my membership in the party of debt, dependency and degeneracy by telling people I was a “conservative Democrat.” This is not all that uncommon among those of us who have seen the light and puts me in some pretty august company.
Recently I was watching a rerun of ‘Booknotes’ with Gertrude Himmelfarb — now a respected historian and neo–conservative, but in her youth a Trotskyite, which — for those of you suffering from recent history instruction in public schools — is a variety of Communist. When asked how she made the ideological journey from Trotsky to Reagan, it warmed my heart when explained that she was always a pretty conservative Trotskyite.]
In 1990 I found myself working as media consultant for Tom McRae who was Bill Clinton’s last gubernatorial primary opponent in Arkansas.
At that time Clinton was eight to ten years into his affair with Gennifer Flowers, had played jack–in–the–box with Paula Jones, reportedly used the state troopers to ferry women and was generally known as someone you wouldn’t leave unsupervised with your college–age daughter.
Yet our TV spots featured none of this lurid material for the simple reason that, regardless of the truth, the rumors were old news to voters and reporters. Clinton had been re–elected previously when Flowers was just starting to bloom. The fact that she had now taken root, along with a complete inventory of other women, was simply not a factor as he sought his fifth term.
Instead, our spots were built around “It’s time for a change” and highlighted the fact Clinton was just going through the motions while preparing to run for president. Our woefully underfunded campaign held Clinton to a meager 54 percent.
Two years later Clinton was in for a rude surprise during the New Hampshire Presidential Primary. Rumors he thought dead and buried arose in the form of tapes secretly recorded by Flowers and played for the news media.
Why was his old squeeze from the Ozarks suddenly relevant? Simple, Clinton changed the scope of his campaigning, from statewide candidate in Arkansas to nationwide candidate and new voters were unaware of his randy streak. These voters were encountering information that he thought was safely behind him and Clinton was caught unprepared. Overcoming the shock required a comprehensive campaign of lies to a gullible news media that just barely saved his campaign.
The same phenomenon is being repeated today — minus the lies and the lingerie.
Texas Governor Rick Perry is encountering past issues he previously overcame. If Perry had been content to stay in Texas and run for governor, US Senator or Congress the forced HPV vaccinations for schoolgirls and in–state college tuition for children of illegal aliens would have been non–issues.
This is because winning an election, similar to baptism, washes one clean of all past political sins. Where Christian baptism differs from elections is Christ doesn’t care about geography. You’re just as clean in Austin as you are in Arlington. But in politics absolution doesn’t travel across the border.
In Florida and elsewhere conservative Republicans are appalled at Perry’s executive decision to require schoolgirls to be vaccinated for a disease that comes through sexual activity and his signature on a law that grants in–state college tuition to the children of illegal aliens.
Perry appears to be appalled that voters have found out.
His debate answers are awkward and off–message for Republicans. He says his decision with regard to HPV vaccinations was wrong and he would not do it again. So far so good, but then he rationalizes by saying it would save lives. So would requiring every citizen of Texas to wear a ballistic vest when leaving the house, but it would not be a conservative policy.
His most recent answer to the tuition controversy only served to drive his poll numbers down. Telling opponents of granting special privileges to children of illegals that they “don’t…have a heart” is simply stupid. Democrats are the land of “follow your feelings,” Republicans prefer to follow the rule of law.
If Perry’s answers don’t improve his campaign will be the second bubble to burst, following that of Rep. Michelle Bachmann. But either way, he serves as an instructive lesson for politicians who are looking to expand their political horizons in the future.
Michael R. Shannon is a public relations and advertising consultant with corporate, government and political experience around the globe. He is a dynamic and entertaining keynote speaker. He can be reached at [email protected]

Erring On The Side Of Life

During the CNN/Tea Party debate in Florida, one topic in particular became the focal point of attack on Texas Governor Rick Perry. Congresswoman Bachmann, in particular, went on the offensive against Governor Perry on this issue.

While Governor Perry said that his decision had been wrong, and he would not make the same decision again, he also added that in matters of life, he will always err on the side of life.

The topic continues to be debated from the political side of things, in regards to the motives of Governor Perry’s decision, the fact still remains that Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is a very real disease with very real consequences. It is also the most common sexually transmitted disease.

While the exact statistics for those infected with HPV varies, the numbers are still astronomical! According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in America. It affects the genitals of both males and females. It can also infect the mouth and throat. Most people who have HPV do not realize they have the virus, and therefore, unknowingly spread the disease to any sexual partners they may have.

There are between 40 and 70 separate strains of HPV, some of which can cause cervical, anal and other genital cancers.

From 2003-2004, a team with the CDC calculated the total number of women in the United States aged 14-59 who were infected with the HPV virus to be nearly 27%. This means more than 1 in 4, which equals nearly 25 million women in the United States are infected with HPV.

More current statistics state that at least 50% of sexually active men and women contact HPV at some point in their lives.

I am one of those 25 million women. I am a statistic.

I was diagnosed with HPV in my early 20’s, which is the most common age group of those infected. I have had numerous procedures to remove cancerous cells from my cervix. Every procedure was very painful. With every procedure the waiting game started over. Will my next PAP Smear come back bad?

It’s now been nearly 10 years since I’ve had a bad PAP Smear. I am very faithful in going to have my yearly Well-Woman exams, in the hopes of preventing any further issues. However, my choices in my late teens and early 20’s resulted not only in a sexually transmitted disease, but a common side effect of HPV is infertility. After many years of trying unsuccessfully to conceive, my husband and I adopted our children. While I love my children with everything in me, and know that God has a purpose and reason in all things, the fact still remains that my actions started a chain reaction. Thankfully, in the end, the chain reaction ended well. However, there were many, many years in between that were very painful- emotionally, mentally, physically and spiritually.

You very well may be one of these statistics, and never realize it.

While I still stand by the fact that I do not believe it is the government’s place to make medical decisions for citizens, it is also quite understandable how the facts are astounding! While I still disagree with Governor Perry’s executive order, which he later rescinded, I understand his sentiment that cancer is a very real disease. I also understand his statement that he will always err on the side of life.

Governor Perry has since discovered there are many risks with the Gardasil vaccine. There are also many risks with no vaccine. There are enormous risks if we do not teach the concept of choices and consequences.

 

What are the signs and symptoms of HPV?

While statistics show that most people who contact HPV never show signs of HPV, and in 90% of people the body’s immune system clears the virus naturally within two years. However, sometimes HPS infections are not cleared up and can cause further issues, which include:

  • Genital warts- can often be seen, but in some cases they cannot be.
  • Rarely, warts in the throat, known as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP)- can block the airway, causing a hoarse voice or troubled breathing
  • Cervical cancer- usually does not have symptoms until it is quite advanced.
  • Other, less common but serious cancers, including cancers of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and oropharynx (back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils)

The strain of HPV that causes genital wars is not the same as the strain of HPV that causes cancers. At this time, there is no way of knowing if a person who gets HPV will develop cancer or other health problems.

HPV is passed by genital contact, most often during vaginal and and anal sex. It can also be passed on during oral sex and genital-to-genital contact.  It can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners, even if the infected partner has no signs or symptoms of the disease.

A person can have HPV even if it has been years since since they’ve had sexual contact with an infected person. It is possible to contact more than one type of HPV.

On rare occasions, a pregnant woman with genital HPV can pass HPV to her baby during delivery. Very rarely, the child can develop juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JORRP).

How common are HPV and related diseases?

HPV (the virus). Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. Another 6 million people become newly infected each year. HPV is so common that at least 50% of sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives.

Genital warts. About 1% of sexually active adults in the U.S. have genital warts at any one time.

Cervical cancer. Each year, about 12,000 women get cervical cancer in the U.S. Almost all of these cancers are HPV-associated.

Other cancers that can be caused by HPV are less common than cervical cancer. Each year in the U.S., there are about:

  • 1,500 women who get HPV-associated vulvar cancer
  • 500 women who get HPV-associated vaginal cancer
  • 400 men who get HPV-associated penile cancer
  • 2,700 women and 1,500 men who get HPV-associated anal cancer
  • 1,500 women and 5,600 men who get HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancers (cancers of the back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils) [Note: Many of these cancers may also be related to tobacco and alcohol use.]

Certain populations are at higher risk for some HPV-related health problems. This includes gay and bisexual men, and people with weak immune systems (including those who have HIV/AIDS).


 

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Sources:

WebMD
CDC.gov 

GOP Debate Moves From Ponzi Scheme To Vaccinations

Tonight was the CNN/Tea Party GOP Presidential Candidate Debate in Florida.

Let’s talk about the positives.

As a viewer at home, this format was one of the best so far. It was very helpful to have the topic being discussed and the question printed so clearly at the bottom of the screen.

While Wolf Blitzer was not nearly as condescending as the hosts in the previous debate (Brian Williams, specifically), he left a lot to be desired. But what else can we expect from a left-leaning network?

Now let’s move on to why we are really here. The actual debate.   Where, oh where, shall we begin?

We’ll start with the easy ones first.

Jon Huntsman. There’s really not much that can be added that hasn’t been said before. Jon Huntsman is delusional and should just accept the fact that he’s running on the wrong ticket.

Mitt Romney. He lost the nomination last time, so therefore, the GOP Establishment obviously feels like it’s “Mitt’s Turn” to be the nominee. Sorry, GOP Establishment, We The People have had enough of you caring more about who’s “turn” it is, rather than who the People want as their nominee! It’s no wonder why people have left the Republican Party in droves, and now identify themselves as Tea Party members, Independents, Conservatives, or some mixture of the the three.

Ron Paul was Ron Paul. There is no doubt what Ron Paul believes. You know who he is. He’s been exactly the same for the last 30 years. In debates, he’s also the same. He has a couple of moments where he shines brightly. In the very next second he crashed and burned. Tonight’s debate was the same as any other debate. Ron Paul shines brightly. He crashes and burns.

Moving on along.

Rick Santorum. As was the case in the last debate, you almost forget he’s a candidate until he’s asked a question. By the time the next question gets to him, you’ve forgotten him already.

Newt Gingrich had another good night. Last week was the now-infamous scolding of the MSNBC Debate moderators.  In tonight’s debate, the former Speaker of The House stood out yet again. Unfortunately, while he has some really great points, is very knowledgable in our history and has a lot of great ideas, his demeanor comes across as very cranky. Speaker Gingrich should most definitely be a member of the elected President’s cabinet.

Herman Cain. Mr. Cain is, in many ways, exactly what this country needs! He is not a politician, he is a business man. He’s never held a political position, but has been very successful in the business world. While there are many positives about Mr. Cain, there are also a some negatives that have started to show through, in the course of these debates. In tonight’s debate, he clarified his stance on the Federal Reserve a bit better than he has previously, but he still did not come across strong enough on this issue.

Michele Bachmann. Before she entered the race for the presidency she was someone to watch. However, she continues to slide further and further from relevancy in this race. While tonight she fared a bit better than the previous debate, it was by a very, very, very slim margin. She’s hanging her hat on the fact that she was the winner of the Iowa Straw Poll, yet fails to realize that poll is not a determining factor in the actual election.

That brings us to the last candidate.

Rick Perry. While last week’s debate was an all-out brawl against the Governor of Texas because he dares to call Social Security what it is- a Ponzi Scheme, this week’s debate became the Gardasil attack. Governor Perry made it very clear that he made a mistake with this piece of legislation.

In 2007, Governor Perry issued a very controversial executive order mandating that girls in Texas receive the HPV vaccine. There was an opt-out option for parents in the original executive order. Later that same year, after much opposition from the citizens of Texas, Governor Perry signed into law a bill that would undo his executive order.

9-14-11 Editing to add a correction to the original article: Governor Perry did not actually sign the law, stating:

 “Rather than allowing this issue to be held captive one more day by legislative politics and the inevitable posturing that will ensure during a veto override debate, I have decided to let it become law without my signature.  It is time to move this issue from the political arena to the court of public opinion where real lives are at st[ake], and it is time to do so without delay.”

continuing with the original article:

In tonight’s debate, Governor Perry was asked directly if he would make a different decision now, if he had it to do all over again. Without hesitation he said that his decision had been wrong, and he would not make the same decision again. He added that in matters of life, he will always err on the side of life.

There are those who use this one wrong decision to completely discount the positive things about his leadership abilities.

There is one other issue that is a chink in Governor Perry’s armor, and that is his stance on immigration. While simply building a fence is not the solution, neither are sanctuary cities or any form of the Dream Act. While Texas’ Dream Act may not be the same as Harry Reid’s Dream Act, the fact is simple: if someone is here illegally, they are violating the law!

It will be interesting to see if all 8 candidates are still around, or if perhaps we will see any new faces in the next debate .

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Sources, as provided by a CDN reader:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,258764,00.html#ixzz1XtVaJA1f

http://www.chron.com/news/article/House-panel-votes-to-block-HPV-order-1819323.php

http://www.bpnews.net/printerfriendly.asp?ID=25492

http://www.msmagazine.com/news/uswirestory.asp?id=10308