Tag Archives: Black History Month

Is Black History Month Outdated with Obama’s Re-election as President

Is Black History Month still necessary with Barack Obama Election

Is Black History Month still necessary with Barack Obama Election

Has Black History Month met its end with the re-election of Barack Obama? One could make a solid case for calling a halt to the month of February as an official celebration of the achievements of Black Americans, since many of the injustices of the past have died away along with the perpetrators. In the 21st Century should not the focus be on a unified America that celebrates and acknowledges the achievements of all Americans throughout the year?

The advent of Black History month began in 1926 as the second week in February, and was known as Negro History Week. Its creator, black historian Carter G. Woodson was clear about its purpose and eventual end. He insisted at the time that the holiday be eliminated, when “black history became fundamental to American history.”

Last year, noted international author Maya Angelou appeared to agree when she explained in an interview, “We want to reach a time when there won’t be Black History Month, when black history will be so integrated into American history that we study it along with every other history,” according to Fox News.

Well, it appears apparent that the jury is in and the verdict is clear, the need for Black History Month has met it original purpose. Woodson’s edict was that the need for the month to continue into perpetuity was not its purpose. Black history has been mainstreamed into what it always has been, and that is; part of America’s history. Even Academy Award winning actor Morgan Freeman strongly asserted in a Sixty Minutes interview, “Black History Month is ridiculous… Black History is American History!”

Well it seems that Barack Obama’s election has sealed the deal on that, considering that February was chosen as the official month to honor Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. Lincoln freed the black slaves and, is it not fitting that the end of this holiday has indeed run its natural course with the election and re-election of the first black president of the United States?

Americans have an opportunity to move on and stop reliving the practices and outrages of racism which once permeated every aspect of the nation’s culture. Blacks have been elected governors, and congress has growing numbers of black elected leaders. Now with a president who is black, where again is the need for Black History Month?

It is unnecessary to keep track of black achievement in areas of professionalism and other fields of achievement. These achievements are American achievements, and should not continue to be segregated or celebrated by racial designation.

The nation should be focused on celebrating the future of a united nation where racial designations have no purpose or place. If America is to truly become one nation, indivisible with justice for all, then it must do away with the categories and the special designations which continue to keep Americans separate and apart. Is this not now the spirit and practice of reverse racism?

If one were to scan the landscape of America, can anyone honestly say that the vestiges of slavery are still in existence in America? Certainly one can still find crushing poverty, spiraling joblessness, as well as growing gun violence and gang activity in large cities.

But those problems which plague large urban centers where blacks live in great majorities are not problems related to racism. In these cities blacks are in control of the reins of power, and unless one believes that blacks are discriminating against their own, racism is indeed dead.

So how long can Americans continue to be held hostage to a notion that a black person who has reached the summit of political power in this nation means Whites are perpetrating large scale racism?

How long can children in America’s classrooms be subjected to speeches and plays and political diatribes from teachers about “White Racism.” And should those children be exposed to lessons that focus on those ‘bad white people’ who used whips, hoses and dogs to attacks blacks, as if those practices still occur? Many black leaders and liberals would love to continue this pointless indoctrination in order to justify continuing affirmative action.

There is no need to promote a month that gives black children a reason to point fingers at white children and act as if they are being victimized. There is no reason for white children to duck their heads and feel unearned guilt for practices they were not responsible for and that no longer exist.

This month which fosters a false premise of continued racial suffering and separatism by a non-white society is untrue and unnecessary. Racial preferences based upon these continued falsehoods must cease. No child in America should be saddled with the notion that they have to give up their place in line for a job, a career or for justice based on race. This month has reached its saturation point and even its original creator Carter G. Woodson would say, “Enough is enough!”

America is a nation where justice must be color blind. The lessons of the past have given us a wonderful road map to the future. This is a future where special designated months for African Americans, Hispanics or any other racial preference group is not necessary or needed. We are all Americans, no subtitles are necessary.

How about next February 2014, at the beginning of the month each day becomes a reflection of what is good, great and outstanding in the core of each of us as Americans. This is something an undivided color-blind nation can truly celebrate.

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The Importance of Strengthening the Modern Day Black Family

As we celebrate and acknowledge the significance of Black History Month, we remember those who paved the way for success and progress among the black community. We remember the dream of Martin Luther King, Jr. to promote racial equality and to eradicate poverty and injustice. We remember the bravery and courage of Rosa Parks that ignited the Civil Rights Movement. We remember the education visionaries such as Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois.

The task that this generation faces to preserve these legacies and accomplishments is to strengthen the modern day black family. The structure of the family is crucial in meeting social and economical needs.

It is essential and highly imperative that the role of the father be exemplified in black families. Many of the young black men that find themselves shackled to the chains of jails and prisons have lacked a strong father figure in their lives. Fathers provide wisdom, insight, discipline and encouragement. Nobody can serve as a greater role model than a father that is present in their children’s lives. Being a father is much more than being a semen donor. It requires having a consistent and active presence. It’s a father’s unconditional love that not only helps his children as they are growing up, but also allows them to treat other people in society with dignity and respect. A father’s love encourages his children to always dream and pursue their goals, and enthusiastically encourages them to be whatever they set their minds to be.

It’s a father’s discipline and maturity that will teach his children financial structure and how to provide the basic essential needs for their future families.
It is also a father’s spiritual hand of guidance that will instruct his children to depend on Almighty God for strength and refuge in times of adversity and great challenges.
I do want to applaud the strong efforts of the young, single black mother who may have to work multiple jobs to provide for her family. She is strong, relentless and faithful to her family. She possesses the courage to sacrifice her needs to make sure her family has the basic essentials of life. However, this does not excuse the absence of a father figure. A mother’s love and warmth should be complimented by the leadership of the father playing his role as head of his household.

A “perfect” family simply does not exist, whether it’s a black or white household. Every family endures struggles, hardships, emotional turmoil and various differences within the household. However, a strong and cohesive bond between the two-parent catalyst will provide wisdom and enrichment that will last a lifetime.

It is highly encouraging when I see many black students enrolled in college and pursuing good careers. It is indeed a reflection of the American dream to see many black individuals start their own businesses and become successful entrepreneurs. However, my heart does ache for the black families who may live in poverty and do not have access to many financial resources as some do. I believe this is due to a weakened family structure. If the black family structured is broken down, we risk the chance of preserving our history and gains in culture in society. Black history must not be a subject that is examined in history books in February alone, but it is what makes America the strong, diverse and thriving nation that it is. The strengthening of the modern day black family will be a thriving force in America’s greatness.