Author Archives: Lauri Bohanan

An American Anthem

I recently assigned Ayn Rand’s novella Anthem to my freshman English students as a reading assignment. I’ve read this piece numerous times over the years, but this was the first time I had read it through someone else’s eyes – my students’. It also resonated with me differently this time because of the current entitlement crisis as represented by the Occupy movement.

Those who have not read Anthem, or are unfamiliar with Ayn Rand, might not know that the prevailing goal in her writing is to show the superiority of individualism to collectivism. In Anthem, she paints the picture of a society in which government provides everything for all and no individuals or traits of individuality are allowed to exist. Vocations and breeding partners are chosen by the government. Humans are not even permitted to have names. Instead, they are classified into groups and then given a number. The protagonist, for example, is referred to as Equality 7-2521. The words used to reference characters in the story are all collective in nature (“we,” “us” and “our”), even when it is clear to the reader that a speaker is simply referring to him or herself.

This notion is strangely reminiscent of the ways in which Americans have begun to categorize themselves. Take the popular practice of hyphenating cultural identities as an example. We are not individuals or even Americans in this country anymore. We are “African-Americans” or “Mexican-Americans.” Beyond our collective cultural labels, we are grouped according to our socio-economic status: “middle America,” “millionaires and billionaires,” or “the less fortunate.” One can quickly begin to see that the distinction between the fictional, government-imposed label “Equality 7-2521” and the self-imposed OWS label “We are the 99%!” is minor. In fact, it’s much more offensive that Americans would impose such collective ideals upon themselves.

The Occupy crowd argues that the government should provide health insurance, free college tuition, homes, and a job for everyone. This is precisely how it happens in Rand’s Anthem. Equality 7-2521 is relegated to the vocation of street sweeper. Though he is quite brilliant in math, he accepts this lesser position and views it as an unintentional consequence for his near-obsession with the illegal activity of knowledge acquisition. You see, he reads. Voraciously. Through the course of his reading activity, he eventually comes across the forbidden word “I,” and this is where Rand’s plot takes a hopeful turn. Upon recognition that he is an individual, his eyes open to possibilities, his mind to new perspectives. At one point, he finally “sees himself” when he looks into a pond and notices his reflection. As a result of these discoveries, he begins to rebel.

Those who are active in the Occupy movement already seem to have rebellious tendencies, so perhaps we can assume that they are just an ignorant bunch. Like Equality 7-2521 – who eventually assigns himself the name of Prometheus – perhaps each individual of the entitlement mindset should undertake the challenge of reading his or her way to self-discovery. Maybe each should also take a look in the mirror and decide whether or not he likes the reflection he sees. He should read Rand’s prediction of what life would be like if the government was the end all, be all. Considering she escaped the Bolshevik Revolution in Soviet Russia, Rand’s words bear the weight of experience and should not be discounted. She wrote Anthem – and subsequent novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged – because she saw signs decades ago that America was headed down the same Socialist path.

Perhaps the best lesson in reading this 100-page fictional story can be found in its nod to ancient myth. The mythological character on which Rand’s Prometheus is based is best known for stealing fire from Zeus and offering it to humankind so that humans could rely on themselves instead of the powerful overseer. It would be great to see these same principles applied to those who classify themselves as “less fortunate” or who think they are “entitled” to have someone else provide for them. These Occupiers need to see themselves as empowered and not entitled. Rand paints the dismal picture of what the world would look like if we relinquished all individual power and allowed ourselves to be grouped into categories, to be controlled by our government. She shows us what thinking of ourselves as part of the 99% really looks like, and it ain’t pretty.

Is Higher Ed to Blame for the Plight of the Occupiers?

While speaking at a recent EDUCAUSE Conference, higher ed journalist, Anya Kamenetz, commented that “Occupy Wall Street is a referendum on the value of higher education.” Even though the rest of her presentation was rather interesting, this statement went on to occupy my thoughts.

The OWS crowd is angry. The 20-somethings in that movement resent the fact that they have college degrees, a tremendous amount of student loan debt, and no job. They want someone to blame for their frustration. Politicians push them to blame the banks and corporations or to blame the government, but there is also a tangible amount of frustration being directed at higher ed. After all, these institutions have promised that acquisition of a college degree will earn them a “better job” or “brighter future.” The academic experience should instead be marketed as what it really is: an enlightened path to the life you are ready to earn.

Beyond this fallacy in marketing, academic institutions are being improperly blamed. When looking at the recent college graduate who is struggling to jump-start his life, one must consider more than the possession of a college degree. Employers also look at level of workplace skill, industry knowledge, work ethic, reliability, diversity of experience, professional and personal references, and general likeability. All of these characteristics can be developed during college, but many students choose not to do the necessary work.

Mediocrity is rampant in classes I teach: students who repeatedly miss classes and deadlines, who refuse to purchase required textbooks, and many who disengage but never even bother to withdraw from the class (thereby forfeiting scholarship – i.e., someone else’s – money). They spend more time defending or making excuses than it would have taken to do the work. If these students are lucky enough to meet the bare minimum requirements, they finish the class with a C. They move on to the next class, where they will repeat the same behaviors, ultimately making mediocrity a habit.

Eventually, this C student graduates and then competes for a job against a student who worked harder and applied herself more and, as a result, graduated with a better chance of employment. The former student lacks motivation, work ethic, and sufficient knowledge, while the latter is more responsible, more motivated, and probably has numerous faculty recommendations to vouch for these traits.

What it comes down to is how hard the individual is willing to work. Yes, the cost of a college degree is a challenge and can seem inhibiting for many. But the existence of post-graduation debt and financial instability isn’t based solely on the high cost of a college degree. Plenty of students graduate with manageable debt or no debt at all. They are the ones who worked their way through college, did the work to identify scholarship resources while still in high school, or participated in work study programs. Their financially-frustrated counterparts wanted the full “college experience” but wanted to pay for it later, thereby accumulating immense student loan debt.

Having a college degree doesn’t guarantee we will be debt-free and gainfully employed any more than having a gym membership guarantees we will be thin and healthy. There is real work and sound decision-making that goes on behind the scenes to ensure that one leads to another.

I would encourage the Occupiers who want a career and financial security to get to the business of making that happen. They can start re-appropriating the time, energy, and voice being wasted in trash piles of city parks all over this country to begin to earn their place in the world of work. More directly, to the 15% of OWS protesters who are unemployed, I would say this…

Study the organizations you want to work for, and market yourself to them. Earn some solid recommendations from people whose opinions a potential employer will value. Take on an internship or volunteer in the industry in which you intend to work (the research shows internships almost always lead to full-time employment). Begin making connections with the movers and shakers in the business world instead of scorning them with chicken scratch on 99 cent poster boards. Earn their respect, and you will earn your future position.

As an added bonus to this hard work and sound decision-making, you will likely find yourself in a better position to pay down your debt and better equipped to manage your personal finances going forward. It’s about choices. Make the choice to better your situation instead of waiting around for someone else to fix it for you. And rather than dismiss your college experience as a waste of time, reflect on the intellectual return on investment you’re experiencing. Oh wait, that’s a free-market metaphor, and you probably skipped that class.