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Author Archives: Katherine Revello

Ted Cruz Proves Presidential Mettle in Clash With Code Pink

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For conservatives, intellectualism can often be a stumbling block. A politician may be a gifted orator with a logical, detailed message, but reason cannot be forced on those with an agenda, especially when that agenda is wrapped up in bromidic insults instead of facts. Once distracted from the flow of their thought processes, and unwilling to engage in emotional demagoguery, ...

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Does Modern Populism Have an Answer to Modern Political Problems?

For many efficaciously disillusioned Americans, populism is the sole redeeming hope on which hangs a return to political virtue. Yet, modern populists, both left and right, have a spotty record of success. True, the Tea Party and anti-Wall Street, class warfare leftists have seen electoral success in the last couple of elections. However, after assuming power, they have done little. ...

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Electoral Models: Why Past Successes Shouldn’t Dictate the Future

RCP average 2016 presidential polls

The linear tyranny of time is a major problem with which political scientists must grapple. Public opinion both influences and is influenced by the metrics scientists use to capture attitudes towards hot button topics and assess the competitiveness of local, state and federal races. But, all the tools used to measure current races are based on successful algorithms from past ...

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Jim Webb’s Unassuming Populism

While most of last weekend’s media coverage was focused on the bombast that was Donald Trump’s FreedomFest speech, former Senator Jim Webb (D-VA) was giving an interview on Fox News Sunday. Over the course of the segment, Webb agreed with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in his criticism of the Iran nuclear deal. He suggested he would be open ...

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William Jennings Bryan Lives Again in Donald Trump

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The presidential election of 1896 was by no means a placid one. Civil War issues still lingered in a continuing sense of economic and civil unease. These tensions were not allayed by rapid westward expansion, made possible by the Industrial Revolution. Not only was small town America seemingly destined for extinction under this revolutionary connection, but it ramped up economic ...

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Silence of the Lambs

To both religious and secular prophesiers, men are sheep. There is a striking duality in this image. They are innocent and docile, and conversely biddable. In Jeremiah, the Lord declares how he will lead the wicked Babylonians “like lambs to the slaughter,” and make that storied city a horror to the world. Modern America stands on the precipice of such ...

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The Washington Redskins and the Death of Federalism

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Federalism in America has seemingly reached the point of being nothing but a romantic daydream for quixotic political idealists. Neither states nor individuals, whose retention of rights beyond those enumerated in the Constitution are safeguarded by the Ninth and Tenth Amendments, seem to have any interests that the federal government considers beyond its purview if there’s some altruistic crusade that ...

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Disrespect for Property at Heart of Global Debt Crisis

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In the aftermath of Greek voters’ overwhelming rejection of a deal with the European Central Bank, many options are being discussed to prevent the much discussed Grexit. Demonstrating that nothing is absolute in politics, especially when money is concerned, approximately a month will transpire before the actual repercussions of the vote are known, as European leaders must meet and discuss ...

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The Modern Zenger Trial: Can Truth Be Discriminatory?

The origins of freedom of the press in America can really be traced back to 1735 and the trial of John Peter Zenger. Zenger, the editor of a small newspaper in colonial New York, regularly printing material derogatorily portraying royal governor William Crosby. For the crime of printing negative comments grounded in fact, Zenger was put on trial for treason. ...

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John Roberts Falls Victim to the Slippery Slope

When public officials want to gift themselves new powers, they usually justify their expansive actions with their favorite platitude, “for the greater good.” Conservatives, in their turn, respond with the proverbial warning of the slippery slope. The problem, of course, is the dynamism of American politics means the powers one party invests themselves with are then available for the next ...

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Majority Decision in King v. Burwell Eviscerates Separation of Powers

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According to the Fabian socialist-based government in George Orwell’s 1984, war is peace and freedom is slavery. And according to the democratically-conscious Chief Justice John Roberts Supreme Court, a fee is a tax and state means federal. The Court’s 6-3 ruling in King v. Burwell upholding the legality of subsidies in states that refused to set up a federal exchange ...

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Populism, Racism and the Left

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Somehow, as seems to be the case with every tragedy that occurs in America, the tragic murder of nine people in South Carolina by a racist murderer has been hijacked for political gain. Any Republican who doesn’t publicly repudiate the Confederate flag as a symbol of segregation and oppression and call for its immediate removal from South Carolina government grounds ...

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Political Correctness, Statism and the Rule of Law

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Modern government embodies nothing so much as Don Quixote. It assumes a mantle of morality- protecting the rights of the minorities who cry discrimination and disenfranchisement- and rides off to the rescue without bothering to look at whether the societal giants it tilts at are monsters or just windmills. Unfortunately, it is real people, many of them business people just ...

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Donald Trump and Media’s Treatment of Presidential Candidates

When Donald Trump announced his candidacy for president earlier this week, America let loose a collective snort of derision. For years, as Trump has flirted with running for the nation’s highest office, it has seemed as though the media mogul has been stumping with the sole purpose of generating publicity for his brand. While some charge, with some merit, this ...

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The Continuing Importance of Magna Carta to American Civil Liberties

Magna Carta

June 15th marked the 800 year anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta. Signed by King John in a meadow at Runnymede in an attempt to quell a rebellion amongst his barons, the charter was violated almost immediately. Not a single of the articles within it is in effect today. Nevertheless, this is perhaps the single most important historical ...

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