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The Liberals War On The Dictionary

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About Chris Vaca

6 comments

  1. No one is interested in banning books, and one of the ways you can tell is that you referenced Gone With the Wind, which, among other things, is a love letter to the KKK. This kid is interested in taking ownership of a word so that it cannot be used to hurt. Why does anyone have to feel threatened by that? It is not as if the word ceases to exist now, and that idiots will stop using that word as a way to make themselves feel superior to others. What this young woman has done is asked that a company not promote that usage.

    • A love letter to the KKK, you need to check yourself in for some help.

      • Chris, this guy Jon is your typical Lib. You can tell with his comment about Gone with the wind that if he could, he would be the first in line to ban it from schools and libraries.
        These Liberals see race in everything.

        • Have you actually read Gone With the Wind, or just seen the movie? Almost all of the male characters who were sympathetic were members of the KKK. Did I say I wanted it banned? No. I don’t want any books banned. You are the one who insisted book banning be part of this scenario.

          • I went to school when we had to read books, yes I read it. I agree with Chris, First you Libs are banning words, now you are banning definitions, it is only logical your next step would be banning books. You say you are not for it now, but if it becomes P.C. guys like you will be first in line with a book of matches.

    • @Jon… you don’t now your American History very well.

      “On April 21, 1954, Dr. Frederic Wertham strode into the U.S. Senate hearing room in a white lab coat, a symbol of the same authority he wielded while writing Seduction of the Innocent, his condemnation of the comics industry, especially the horror genre, as corrupting America’s youth. The Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency, led by Senator Estes Kefauver fresh from his victory over organized crime, put comics on trial, which Trombetta explains became more of a show trial. It was a foregone conclusion that comics would never be the same again. An entire industry of horror comics disappeared literally overnight. Words such as “horror” and “terror” were banned by the new code, and even “crime” faced heavy restrictions. “It was, in true Orwellian fashion,” Trombetta writes, “as if the government thought bad things would vanish if they couldn’t be read or thought about.” Of course, people continued to think about these “bad things,” but in a new “government approved way.”

      Scare Tactics: Banned Horror Comics of the 1950s

      http://bigthink.com/Picture-This/scare-tactics-banned-horror-comics-of-the-1950s