The New Enemy, Part II: Marxism

By | August 20, 2011

 

            My last article introduced you to collectivism and its fallacies. In this article, I hope to explain Marxism and how it has intruded into the United States.

 

Background

 

            Karl Marx was born in 1818 and he died in 1883. He was trained as a philosopher, and he studied political and economic theory on his own. He became very interested in “class struggle” while he was in college. When he graduated in 1841, he was hired by the “Rheinische Zeitung,” a German newspaper, to be their editor. It is here that he began his public life. When he wrote an editorial column with his opinions concerning the life of peasants, he was labeled a communist by his opponents. He was terminated from the position due to the claim. This situation caused him to go to Paris where accusations continued, mainly from the French and Prussian governments.

            Beginning in 1843, he began to develop his political philosophy. The process took 40 years. His intentions were to liberate wage earners and workers from the capitalist system of 19th century Europe. His main point was the elimination of private property, which was the means of production, and it would be put into the purview of the “people” aka, the government that would be set up based on his economic and political principles.

            In a close relationship with Fredrich Engels, he further developed his economic and political philosophies. These included a call to a revolution of the workers which he deduced had been the sole producers of wealth due to exploitation.

            Both Marx and Engels were forced to leave Paris due to their writings. They traveled to Brussels, Belgium where they co-wrote The German Ideology. Marx’s next publication, The Poverty of Philosophy, was an analysis of French Socialist thinking. These two publications formed the basis of Marx and Engels’ The Communist Manifesto, which is the most famous of their collaborations.

            The Manifesto was first published on February 21st, 1848 in London and was written in accordance to the wishes of the Communist League, a collection of German émigrés that Marx had won over to his philosophy.

 

An Overview of Marx and Engels’ Philosophy

 

A spider conducts operations that resemble those of a weaver, and a bee puts to shame many an architect in the construction of her cells. But what distinguishes the worst architect from the best of bees is this, that the architect raises his structure in imagination before he erects it in reality (Capital, vol. 1, chap. 7, pt. 1).

 

            Philosophy is an examination of basic concepts such as truth, existence, reality, causality and freedom. Early in his career, Marx developed a political-economic philosophy based in part on the works of Ludwig Feuerbach who had been a student of Hegel. He later abandoned Feuerbach’s line of thought and began to develop his theory of historical materialism.           

            “Marx and Engels’ vision was a purely materialist interpretation of human nature and development within nature that called for revolution. It represented a materialist view of history, based on the dialectic that supported Marx’s theory of political economy and his call for revolution. The interpretation distinguished itself because of its theory of surplus value, which asserted that the wealth of capitalist societies originates solely from the exploitation of laborers. Marx’s analysis of history saw human development as occurring due to a series of class struggles between the ruling class,[and] those who possess the means of production. To Marx, feudal lords, land owners and capitalists were pitted against the ruled working class. This claim is summed up in the opening line of The Communist Manifesto: ‘The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggle.’ Marx predicted the demise of capitalism through a workers’ revolution that would lead to a utopian ‘classless society’ where, according to Marx, ‘people work according to their ability and get according to their needs’ and ‘in which the free development of each is the condition for the free development of all.’” (From: The New World Encyclopedia)

            The Communist Manifesto was a collaboration of Marx and Engels which called for the communists of Europe to unite and publish their ideas, their political and economic aims, because the different organizations were a force of their own. They divided the population into the bourgeoisie; the people who owned the land and factories and other businesses, and the proletariat; those who worked on, or in those facilities.

            As a result of the Industrial Revolution, people left small craftsmen’s shops and flocked to the big factories in the cities for employment. Working conditions were horrendous and wages were low. Fires were common and people lost their lives in factory accidents due to improper training and employees not paying attention to what they were doing as well as unsafe factory environments. Unions used these conditions to form in order to start the workers revolution that Marx and Engels envisioned. Unionization, in fact, led to many changes in the atmosphere of the factories as well as being a link between the worker and upper management or the owner in order to negotiate wages.

            Marx’ historical analysis of the relationship of the classes produces an ever changing landscape; bourgeois and proletariat changing places in the social order throughout the history of mankind. Lenin adopted the Marxist idea however, he made elemental changes to Marx and Engels’ theories and conducted a successful communist revolution.

            The Manifesto contains the seed of Marxism which once planted, grows into a form of altruism that cannot be accomplished without violence, re-education camps and government control of subject’s thoughts, speech, living conditions and reasons for imposing equal misery throughout the population. The only exceptions to the rules of Marxism/Altruism are the ruling class.

            Within the Manifesto are ten conditions designed to destroy the capitalistic system of free markets and replace them with a communist-socialist system that sports an all powerful government. These are called The Ten Planks of Communism.

 

 

The Ten Planks of Communism

 

            The Ten Planks of Communism are essential when setting up a Communist Government in countries that are targeted by organized people. The destruction of Capitalism is the main goal of communism in order to impose their vision of Utopia on the population. Each generation of statists claims that despite the historic failures of socialism and communism, they know how to set the system up better than the previous people who tried it did.

            The Ten Planks are usually introduced incrementally into the legal system of the targeted country by twisting the meaning of words within the governing document.

            One of the first things that collectivists do is change the language of the country they are attempting to take over. By changing the language, leftists can highjack words whose definitions are the exact opposite of their meaning, for example; liberal used to mean someone who is for the free market system, aka capitalism, as well as a limited government, now it is someone who wishes to impose the theft of producer’s money, governmentally and it’s redistribution to those that are “less fortunate;” this requires a big government bureaucracy  Another word that has been abducted is gay for homosexuals. Studies show that the majority of homosexuals are anything but gay.

            Other conditions apply to the gradual take over of a society. Political Correctness and Multi-Culturalism are but two more of the necessary twisted views necessary to overcome freedom loving people.

            Marx designed The Ten Planks of Communism as an assessment of a society as to whether or not it was practicing the communist ideology.

  1. 1.      Abolition of private property and the application of rents from all land usage to public coffers. Zoning is the first step of a government to take over all private lands. The requirements of the EPA are designed to outline not only what land can be used for, but imposition of environmental impact regulations.
  2. 2.      A heavy graduated income tax. The 16th Amendment to the Constitution established in 1913 needs no explanation. Imposing the highest percentage to be paid by the rich is called “paying your fair share.”
  3. 3.      Elimination of all Inheritance Rights. This has been accomplished by Federal and State legislation, arbitrary inheritance taxes.
  4. 4.      Confiscation of property owned by emigrants and terrorists. There are many ways this element of the Ten Planks has infiltrated our legal processes, the most widely used being Asset Forfeit Law. The IRS, DEA, and ATF are the most frequent imposers of forfeit laws.
  5. 5.      Centralization of credit in the hands of the government, by means of a central bank with State capital and an exclusive monopoly. The Federal Reserve is a privately owned bank which controls the credit and debt system of the USA. It issues paper fiat money and practices economically destructive fractional reserve banking. All banks belong to the FDIC which is another privately owned corporation.
  6. 6.      Centralization of communication and transportation. There are numerous Federal agencies to control these areas of our infrastructure. The FCC, FAA, DOT; these are but a few of the controlling interests that the Federal Government has set up.
  7. 7.      Extension of factories and instruments of production under the control of the central government. The cultivation of wastelands and the improvement of the soil generally used in accordance with a common plan. We have the Department of Agriculture and the Desert Entry Act control and subsidize our “wastelands” and privately owned farms. The following agencies also control land usage as well as overseeing the compliance of businesses to regulations: the Department of Commerce and Labor, Department of Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Mines, National Park Service, and the IRS control of business through corporate regulations
  8. 8.      Equal liability of all to labor. The establishment of groups of laborers, especially for farmlands. This plank is adhered to by minimum wage laws and trading with foreign countries that use slave labor, such as China. We see it in practice via the Social Security Administration and the Department of Labor, the national debt and inflation caused by the communal bank has caused the need for a two “income” family. the 19th amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, assorted Socialist Unions, affirmative action, the Federal Public Works Program, Child Labor laws and Executive order 11000.
  9. 9.      The combination of farmlands and industrial producers along with the gradual elimination of the division of city and country through population redistribution. The zoning laws we have contribute to the implementation of this plank. The Planning Reorganization Act of 1949 as well as several Executive Orders provide not only for forced relocation of the population, but also for forced sterilization programs.
  10. 10.  Free education for all children including a combination of education and industrial production. The elimination of all child labor in factories, as well as other businesses including a family owned business. When the founders established this country, schools were privately funded and publically accessible to all children. Now, we have government at all levels intruding into our established educational system. The NEA is responsible for teaching Marxism in the schools, from colleges on down to child care centers. Even our private schools are regulated. Children are taught that the State is more important than the individual. This process has been going on since the mid 1800s when many German and Prussian philosophers were evicted from those countries. They came to America and received posts in our top colleges and universities. Their emphasis on collectivism has filtered down through our educational system reaching all citizens     at this point in time.

 

            As you can see, there are many ways that Marxism has been absorbed into America’s culture and society. I have left the Unions out of this discussion on purpose as I plan another article on how unions were not necessary and how they were the communists’ foot in the door to our capitalistic economy.

            Even though we believe we are free, we have implemented every one of Marx and Engels’ guidelines in the formation of a communist government. Not only do we have to vote the established politicians out of office, we are obligated to insist that the most harmful agencies to our freedoms are dismantled. They may have to be taken apart incrementally but the end game should be the total elimination of all of them.

           

 

None are more hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free….

 

           

 

 

 

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0 thoughts on “The New Enemy, Part II: Marxism

  1. A little Anonymous On top

    Marx predicted the demise of capitalism through a workers’ revolution that would lead to a utopian ‘classless society’. Might that demise look anything like “economic meltdown” ? Show me in history any economy that ever lasted long-term having all the wealth concentrated at the top.